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Showing content with the highest reputation on 21/11/20 in all areas

  1. 23 points
  2. Out with the dog in the peaks. Have a good weekend all!
    23 points
  3. Greetings watch fans, have a great Saturday. My vintage Zenith automatic cal 2552 PC circa 1969
    18 points
  4. Heading out so rolled out the Baltic Aquascaphe
    17 points
  5. Mido Multifort Powerwind
    17 points
  6. 16 points
  7. Morning, Today this French-made Kered (Louis Braham, threads passim) and is another “Resurrection Special” from my watchmaker - called Derek, as it happens. Housed in what is probably anodised aluminium, this one is powered by a 15j Cupillard 233 and I’ve included a “before” image in case anyone’s interested. Regards.
    16 points
  8. Bit of a 'Trigger's broom' for me today. A Casio DW 6630B like the one below was bought back in 1998 for use at work. I wore it for a year, then for some reason, the module packed up. About a month after this happened, I was on holiday on Jersey and a chance stroll down a backstreet in one of the towns (I really can't remember which) found me in front of a little watch shop and I saw the identical watch in the window. However, the backlight didn't work, but as I never used it anyway, I negotiated and bought the watch for a reduced price. It then served me well for 14-15 years at work as a landscaper, until I retired it, battered and bruised for another watch. After I retired, I set about 'rewarding' it for it's impeccable service and only two battery changes in all that time. I scoured t'internet for a new case shroud, but was unlucky. Then our dear friend @Davey P came to the rescue with an identical watch that had been painted black and gave it to me in the hope that I could get the paint off. Sadly, I couldn't, but the watch had a perfect module with a working backlight! So the old module was replaced with Davey's and I eventually found a new case, though I still need a strap. It may not be the original watch any more, but still makes me smile when I wear it. After 14 years hard graft... And now with a fully working module and new shroud. Backlight, too!
    16 points
  9. built this about 18 months back.movement is a hand winding Asian 6947.the dial i had to trim down to fit the case..
    16 points
  10. 1960's Automatic Seiko 6106-8000 Have a great weekend guys!
    16 points
  11. Morning all. Yet another! wet day...Roll on Spring time! On with this Carrera today....Put it on this rally strap, as opposed to the bracelet.
    14 points
  12. Just delivered by the Royal Mail Certina DS Super PH500M Probably going to lose the dive strap it’s a little long for my small wrist.
    14 points
  13. New in yesterday, would like to say direct from Canada but really like friend Jeremy , secondhand. Momentum titanium quartz alarm with independent settable gmt hand. Very pleased
    12 points
  14. Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
    12 points
  15. Movado Tempo-Matic Calibre 138 (Zenith 2552PC) 1969-72
    11 points
  16. I've been looking for a new strap for the Grand Regatta and decided to try a leather nato. In blue to match my eyes. It's rather thick and bulky to look at, but comfortable to wear.
    11 points
  17. I need some warming colour on this grey day.... STEINHART OCEAN ONE BRONZE 103-0575, (ETA 2824, elabore, 25 Jewels) & CORGEUT "Bronze" (PVD, MIYOTA cal.8215,21 Jewels.)
    10 points
  18. Good morning chap's Another one Dug out for an airing. I am not buying any more watches. [emoji17] Well maybe the odd one or two. [emoji16]
    10 points
  19. Another lovely chrono, although I will have to take another picture and blow it up to figure out my time, after I have undertaken my exertions. I have a few autos scattered about in winders now, including my bullhead Citizen chrono, but while that watch may be fine for timing sprints in one's Ferrari, actual running impairs its precision. So this is my grab and go for pounding the pavements.
    10 points
  20. Excuse the water smudge at 11
    9 points
  21. The Sun has come out so I`ve put this on.... Navitron Sundial (solar powered) Plus this, just in case the clouds come back.... Geckota K3 V04 Miyota cal. 8215 21 Jewels
    9 points
  22. Clearing up the leaves in the garden........Bob.
    9 points
  23. Gshock solar for a dull, windy dog walk and for the tip visit later.
    9 points
  24. Excellent stuff, I'd forgotten about that - Looks awesome mate It's the iTime Phantom for me today:
    9 points
  25. Taking it back to the old school (from my collection's perspective). Michael Kors Lexington 5556
    9 points
  26. An old Sandoz on a leather Ralley type strap HAGWE John
    8 points
  27. I can't be doing with strictly so I'm getting out for a walk, my headphones and the latest episode of TGN. 2nd change of the day called for: Vostok Amphibian Classic 170862 Movement in this thing is magic. Just pick it up and it starts ticking.
    6 points
  28. 5 points
  29. I am curious to see the clasp on this 'lunar frost' Zelos I have incoming - it says it is adjustable 'on the fly', so hoping it will have at least 10mm in it (same clasp as the diver below): but with an extra party trick ...
    4 points
  30. Fave part of the rotation
    3 points
  31. BOBO BIRD, WOODEN WATCHES (made in China,Seagull automatic movement, [calibre unknown])
    3 points
  32. 3 points
  33. While browsing eBay for some Art Deco china I stumbled on a rather stylish Ferranti synchronous electric clock......... Sellers original pictures:-.... Well it got me interested and I did some online research and decided that if I could get it cheap it would be an interesting project... The bottom line is that it apparently did not appeal to many others and I got it for £14 It arrived yesterday in the post and on unpacking it I was pleasantly surprised that other than the original mains lead cut off and the fact that it had 80+ years of grime on it, it was in far better condition than the seller's pictures implied! I set about stripping it and when I removed the brass movement cover found that it was really clean inside and that the movement was still well lubricated in all the right places and every thing move silky smooth. When I did my original online research I had found out that the coil resistance should be somewhere between 4 and 5K ohms and on checking it it read right in the middle at 4.5K ohms. I checked with the meter on the Meg ohms range and there was no leakage on the coil windings back to the movement chassis and more importantly the coil didn't smell 'cooked' , this gave me confidence that the clock would almost certainly run if 240V AC was applied to it.. (which was the case ) I cleaned up all of the stripped parts, though I was VERY careful on removing the glass as I half expected that the brown crackle painted metal case would be stuck to the back of the mirror and would pull the silvering off. Fortunately my concerns were unjustified and there were no problems and I was able to clean the back of the glass and remove 80 plus years of film and detritus from it. I do intend to replace the two core mains cable with some suitable 3 core and have got a couple of metres on order, but for the time being I have hooked it up for testing with two core. Results seen below.... Wouldn't look out of place on the mantelpiece of Hercule Poirot's London apartment..... Bugger I can see me getting hooked on these and getting a few more.....
    2 points
  34. There has been mixed reviews, some people have had issues with them, I haven't and it keeps time well. @Raymond Spanks thanks, will have a look. The Yema one I have is nice, just way too long for me! I wouldn't hesitate to recommend the Navygraf. The first lug makes the strap stick out a bit over a small wrist, but as I've said, that is a bonus to me as it means it just fits. And its versatile - see below... @sabailand the Yema has been the most expensive purchase behind my Astrographic. It's cheap in the scheme of what people pay I know. If I had to do a one watch trip, this would be it with a couple of different strap options. Its had lots or wrist time recently as I've been on 2x antibiotics and strong painkillers. Been using the bezel to track my intake intervals as I was gradually tapering the doses so I don't get too hooked on them!
    2 points
  35. I can't really speak for "Dave", but I'm certainly glad you like it
    2 points
  36. This was on my Christmas list, but I have noticed there are a couple of new 200m versions out, so I have been umming and aaaaahing. Looks terrific! p.s. the strap will be fine over your wetsuit. p.p.s while I was trying to choose a Certina dive watch I accidentally bought a completely different microbrand field watch!
    2 points
  37. New York Times portrait of Donald "Don" Blakeslee (pic from static01.nyt.com): Avi-8 is a British-based watch company that specializes in watches that appeal strongly to aviation enthusiasts, with designs that are peppered with allusions to famous and historical planes. The example we are looking at here is the newly launched Avi-8 P-51 Mustang Blakeslee Chronograph, and this model pays tribute not only to the Mustang itself but also to one of the great fighter aces of World War Two - the American pilot Donald Blakeslee. Given that the watch is inspired by, and named after, Donald Blakeslee, it behoves me to give a short biography of this celebrated pilot before moving on to Avi-8’s celebratory chronograph watch. Donald James Matthew Blakeslee (b. Fairport, Ohio, 11 September 1917; d. Miami, Florida, 3 December 2008) began his aviation career in the Royal Canadian Air Force flying Spitfires during World War 2. He then moved to the Royal Air Force Eagle Squadrons before transferring to the United States Army Air Forces in 1942. By the end of the war he was a flying ace, with 15 and a half aerial victories, and had flown more combat missions against the Luftwaffe than any other American pilot. The final Mustang aircraft assigned to Donald Blakeslee in standard 4th Fighter Group livery with red spinner and post-December 1944 wide red nose band. The "WD" on the fuselage denotes 335 Squadron while the letter "C" was used for all Blakeslee's assigned aircraft; he said the C stood for "chief cook and bottle washer". On Blakeslee being rotated home in November 1944, this aircraft was reassigned after repair to Lt Kiser (Pic from americanairmuseum.com): The same P-51D Mustang as above to show the livery in colour. Note that this illustration shows the narrow red noseband that would have been present when Blakeslee flew the aircraft himself. Blakeslee always refused to name his aittcraft (pic from bravobravoaviation.com): Don Blakeslee became interested in flying as a young boy and later, in the mid-1930s, he and a friend purchased a Piper J-3 which his friend unfortunately crashed in 1940, leading Blakeslee to pursue his flying interests elswhere; he decided to join the Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF). At the end of his training in Canada, Blakeslee came to England in May 1941, where he was assigned to 401 Squadron RCAF. This squadron was assigned to the Biggin Hill Wing, and it was while flying sweeps across France that Blakeslee made his first kill, on 22 November 1941, with a Bf 109 destroyed over Desvres. His next actual kills as opposed to damaging an enemy aircraft were not claimed until 28 April 1942 with two Fw 190 fighters probably destroyed. In fact, while Blakeslee was receptive to the principles behind air fighting tactics, he was not himself a particularly good shot; his strength lay in his leadership skills both on the ground and in the air. In recognition of his many sorties flown, his aerial victories, and his leadership qualities, Don Blakeslee (who had now become an acting flight lieutenant) was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross on 14 August 1942. Partly in order to avoid being designated as an instructor pilot, away from combat, Blakeslee volunteered to serve with No. 133 (Eagle) Squadron RAF as its commander. It was with this squadron that he achieved ‘ace’ status during the raid on Dieppe, France, on 18th August 1942, shooting down an Fw 190 and probably destroying another. Together with Nos. 71 and 121 Squadrons, No. 133 Squadron now became part of the US Army Air Force (USAAF) 4th Fighter Group (4th FG) based at a former RAF airfield at Debden. After a few months flying Spitfires, this FG was re-equipped with the new Republic P-47 Thunderbolt in which type Blakeslee had the first “P-47” kill for the Group on 15 April 1943, plus a further claimed kill of another Fw 190 - both kills being near Knocke. On 28 July 1943, Blakeslee led the Group for the first time into Germany, and towards the end of the year, he was increasingly called upon to lead the Group, developing a tactic of circling above any air battle and directing his fighters as necessary. Stirring image of Don Blakeslee in his allotted Mustang P-51D leading the 4th FG on a bomber escort mission on 24 August 1944 (pic from starduststudios.com): Don Blakeslee flew the P-51 Mustang for the first time in December 1943 and subsequently pushed hard to have the 4th FG re-equipped with the new plane, more effectively when he became commanding officer on 4 January 1944. The 8th Air Force Command eventually agreed to the request but stipulated that the pilots must be operational on the P-51 within 24 hours of receiving the aircraft. Blakeslee agreed to the terms and instructed his pilots to “learn how to fly them on the way to the target”. On 6 March 1944, Blakeslee flew the first Mustang over Berlin while defending Boeing B-17s and Consolidated B-24s. In the role of escorting the massed daylight raids of the 8th Air Force over occupied territory under the leadership of Don Blakeslee, the 4th FG became one of the highest scoring groups of VIII Fighter Command, utilizing an effective aggressive style. At the end of April 1944, the 4th FG passed the 500-kill mark and when the War ended, the Group had amassed a tally of 1020 German planes destroyed (550 in flight and 470 on the ground). Blakeslee himself also led the first “shuttle” mission to Russia on 21 June 1944, flying 1,470 miles in a mission lasting over 7 hours. Don Blakeslee was finally grounded in September 1944, having himself amassed a total of 15.5 kills in the air and 2 more on the ground. According to Barrett Tillman of the American Fighter Aces Association, Blakeslee had more missions and hours “than any other American fighter pilot of World War II” and he was held in high standing among Allied pilots. Blakeslee finally retired from the United States Air Force in 1965 with the rank of colonel, and he has been credited with being the most decorated USAAF pilot of World War 2. He not only received medals and awards for his service during World War 2, but also for his years serving during the Korean War. For those who would like a more extensive biography of Donald Blakeslee, a good start is the article about him from the American Air Museum In Britain which can be found online at: americanairmuseum.com/person/44924 Clearly, Don Blakeslee is a worthy contendor for a watch named after him, and Avi-8 has duly complied with its new P-51 Mustang Blakeslee Chronograph. The typography of the Blakeslee Chronograph is inspired by the writing on the body of Blakeslee’s P-51 Mustang; the crown-guard details reference the Mustang’s engine exhausts while the registers resemble the pressure gauge, and the hands apparently look like those on the Mustang’s altimeter. The most arrestingly novel element in the watch is the shape and form of the chronograph pushers which, according to Avi-8, “are custom built and shaped within the line of wings and fuselage”; I am not sure how foolproof these low-level pushers are in practice. Also as a means of reinforcing the relationship with flight instrument displays, the dial of the watch is multilayered. The new Avi-8 Mustang Blakeslee Chronograph is powered by a Seiko caliber VK68-TMI, one of Seiko’s Meca Quartz chronograph movements measuring down to a fifth of a second and including a 24 hour register as well as a date window; the idea behind these movements is to provide quartz accuracy with the feel of a mechanical chronograph when the chronograph is actuated. YouTube review of the Avi-8 P-51 Mustang Blakeslee Chronograph by MAVERICK WATCH REVIEWS at youtu.be/MsprXQFIJWM The Bronze Oak colourway of the Blakeslee Chronograph (pics from i0.wp.com/watchreview.com and i2.wp.com/watchreview.com): The Mustang Blakeslee Chronograph has a 43 mm stainless steel case and is 13 mm thick; the steel bezel has a tachymeter scale. The crystal is anti-reflective mineral glass and water resistance is a stated 5 ATM. The hands and indices are lumed with Superluminova and the H-link stainless steel bracelet has a folding clasp with push buttons. In addition to the steel bracelet, the watch can be bought The Mustang Blakeslee Chronograph comes in five different colourways each of which has been named after one of Blakeslee’s awards, including the Silver Oak and Bronze Oak. The current price of the watch is somewhat in flux, due no doubt to the market problems caused by the Covid 19 pandemic, but I would suggest that the watch - with either the leather strap or steel bracelet - can be had in the various colourways for between £200 and £250. As to whether I would recommend the watch, this is difficult because I am generally somewhat dubious about watches designed to commemorate historical people or events where there is no real connection between the watch/watch company and the person/event being celebrated, especially if an excessive premium has to be paid for the watch. Nevertheless, Avi-8 has cottoned on to a trend that should keep it going into the future, and the company seems pretty competent within that field, with (I am sure) many devoted fans. The five different colourways of the Avi-8 Blakeslee Chronograph (pic from cdn.watchcharts.com):
    2 points
  38. I promise I will leave this thread alone after making just a couple of observations; I am beginning to regret writing the topic at the head of this thread, which was meant to focus as much on the Donald Blakeslee story as on the Blakeslee Chronograph. With regard to your last post, dear Caller, I do feel that it is unrealistic and somewhat unfair to compare Schofield with Avi-8 in the matter of "full disclosure" of where every watch component comers from. Schofield watches are luxury items costing thousands of pounds, and the market structure is very different to that served by Avi-8, whose watches are generally priced between about two and four hundred pounds. Both companies have to survive in their different market sectors and in fact, when you look through the Schofield website, there is just as much hyperbole and marketing flannel as there is with Avi-8. I am all for basic honesty in the watch industry and have agreed that Avi-8 could have been amore open with regard to its origins, but I refuse to take a "holier than thou" approach to watch marketing. Finally, I must just correct you, Polyfun, with regard to the question of Avi-8 using the British English spelling of "colour." Both British English and American English are used in China (both in terms of written English and the spoken language), with the majority of official textbooks still apparently being written in British English; Respect for and use of British English is particularly strong in Hong Kong. It cannot therefore be concluded that the British English spelling on the Avi-8 website is an affectation designed to deceive the unwary into thinking that Avi-8 is a British brand.
    2 points
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