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fredwastell

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About fredwastell

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  1. Have just acquired one of these and it would appear that they are no longer supported by Seiko. Have searched fairly extensively for a seller of parts without luck. Have not yet looked into what are the problems this one has but I thought I would the avenues for buying spares should it arise. So, can anyone point me in the right direction thanks fred
  2. Have just acquired one of these and it would appear that they are nolonger supported by Seiko. Have searched fairly extensively for a seller of parts without luck. Have not yet looked into what are the problems this one has but I thought I would the avenues for buying spares should it arise. So, can anyone point me in the right direction thanks fred
  3. And yet I have seen another thread which links Kered to Seiko. This looks nothing like a Seiko, though.
  4. Most watches do not have a model no. They go by the movement type. Only by someone (who knows what they are doing) removing the back can you know definitively what is inside.
  5. If you have only just started I would either: 1) talk to Simon on the forum or 2) put it on hold until a later date. I suspect that the tool required would be reasonably costly and seldom used by a hobbyist. My preference would be talk to Simon first off.
  6. I have come across a new brand to me which a Carronade. The back has Tressa on it. Is there a tie up or have I got a mismatched article.
  7. I have been taking apart and putting back together for some time. This is a cheap watch and you could "enjoy" becoming proficient by practising on this one rather than buying more expensive watches to develop expertise. I takes a long time and I find it very rewarding to eventually fix a broken one. Do not under-estimate the frustration that begins when screws, springs and etc. ping off in all directions. It is as well to find a dedicated spot for yourself with a white sheet on which, hopefully, the parts will fall. I found that a magnet was also handy to have for those bits falling on a carpe
  8. Oddly I have the same thing with a watch marked as a Guildhall. The calibre(markings) on mine shows a five pointed star and "KE" underneath. Has anyone any thoughts, please.
  9. Often, when this happens it needs to come out the front. Look for an indent in the bezel.
  10. Thanks, Simon. Any news on the Kienzle case back. Also Tracy asked me about the Seiko. All the best and a Happy Christmas - fred
  11. Just acquired a 50/60's watch. Not been serviced(I believe). Took the back off and everything looks OK. The balance moves freely but with little aggression. When the winder is turned and pressure held on it beats much as it should. The mainspring is wound pretty tight and I am thinking that the mainspring is probably gummed up...or is there another reason for the lack of performance. The watch is a House of Jobin (or Tobin). Any help much appreciated.
  12. This is the title of the youtube video. Not sure how to do links. "A $30k Rolex GMT Master ii - Cal. 3186 Full Teardown and Service". The springs are on the date/hand setting side.
  13. Just passing the time and decided to watch the tear down and reassembly of a Rolex Cal 3186. It is a GMT costing about £30k according to the blurb as he was working on it. I was horrified to see some of the components in the watch with the very thin springs which are used to set the hands and change the date. I thought I was looking at one of the cheap Sekonda's I often work on. Real sense of disappointment when comparing this to a Seiko date change spring system. Does anybody know more than I do at first glance or is the Rolex superior quality not all it's cracked up to be. I would love to kn
  14. longines are great and super value for money.
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