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JDMdenon

Hardlex crystal vs Sapphire Crystal

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So, at the moment I own two Seikos and two Tissot's! The Tissot's both have a Sapphire Crystal and the Seiko's both have a Hardlex crystal! 

When reading about the Hardlex it is often seen as being a Con for a watch! But I dont understand why? My SKX's hardlex is as good as the day I got it. So whats all the negativity about??

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I'm not being rude (honest) but I don't care. :)

Most of my watches have "plastic" crystals, apparently as used by "auld nick" himself. Both manufacturers of your watches are good, don't give the crystals a second thought and enjoy wearing them.:yes:

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At least if you scratch Hardlex you can polish it out.   Both have different properties.  Sapphire is scratch resistant and Hardlex is shatter resistant.   Both have their place and are manufactured so suggest as others , get on with enjoying the watch.  

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So, at the moment I own two Seikos and two Tissot's! The Tissot's both have a Sapphire Crystal and the Seiko's both have a Hardlex crystal! 
When reading about the Hardlex it is often seen as being a Con for a watch! But I dont understand why? My SKX's hardlex is as good as the day I got it. So whats all the negativity about??

I have Seiko watches with Hardlex and other watches with mineral and some with sapphire. My honest opinion on this subject is that there are watch people out there that think Hardlex is somehow beneath them, a snob thing.

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I have scratched Hardlex, quite easily as it happened, but I have never damaged any sapphire.

32 minutes ago, ong said:

At least if you scratch Hardlex you can polish it out.   

Really? Have you ever actually tried polishing Hardlex? It's one heck of a job, unlike Hessalite or any of the other acrylics. :)

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Never scratched either, but I suppose put to the test Sapphire would come out on top.  All my Seikos bar one have Hardlex, the most expensive one has Sapphire, so Seiko recognise the difference. :yes:

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To quote Seiko themselves (seiko.com.au/glossary/glass):

 

... There are five types of glass used in SEIKO, PULSAR, and LORUS. They are: Acrylic glass this is a plastic glass also known as a plexi. It is easier to scratch than Hardlex crystal and reflects more light. Shallow scratches can be buffed out easily. Hardlex Glass This is a toughened mineral crystal glass developed by the SEIKO Watch Corporation, which is highly resistant to knocks and scratching. Hardlex glass is now standard in most SEIKO, PULSAR and LORUS models. Mineral Glass A synthetic mineral crystal glass which is highly resistant to knocks and scratches. Sapphire Glass A synthetic sapphire glass which is extremely hard to scratch or mark. This glass is second in hardness only to a diamond and is used mostly in the Premier collection. Sapphlex Glass A new type of glass also developed by and unique to SEIKO. Sapphlex glass is a combination  of Seiko's superior Sapphire and Hardlex glass. The base of the glass is Hardlex and the top is Sapphlex. It is used only in SEIKO sports watches.

 

 

 

 

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40 minutes ago, Damo516 said:

Is @JayDeep sleeping??? :whistle:

Probably sleeps hanging upside down like a bat :thumbsup:

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all said above really - sapphire is clearer and bloody hard to scratch - you would have to trying hard to shatter it though too in my opinion.

i have managed to scratch every seiko hardex i have ever owned (bar one which came pre loved and i haven't had it long enough yet) - no easy job to polish.  have never managed to put a mark on any sapphire crystal ever ...

end of the day i have a seiko inbound as i type ... and i forgot to check the crystal type so perhaps i am not that bothered after all.

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Never scratched either, but I suppose put to the test Sapphire would come out on top.  All my Seikos bar one have Hardlex, the most expensive one has Sapphire, so Seiko recognise the difference. :yes:

This exactly.

Sapphire is better, but to what degree, it's upon the individual user to make that determination, because it's your money buying the item.

 

That said many popular Seiko have aftermarket support and you can often get Sapphire crystal replacements for them. Look at yobokies.

 

People also seem to forget that the thickness of a crystal plays a large role in it's ability to resist shatter. A sapphire 3mm or more thick will very likely stand up to any knock a Hardlex can. So that argument is really very thin. However a Hardlex will never be able to stand up to the scratch resistance of a sapphire.

 

All things are not equal. Not even close.

 

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Thickness of a sapphire does not imply more or less shatter resistance in many instances. The reason is one of simply chemistry/physics. The shatter, if it occurs is due to the crystal covalent bonding nature and its inherent inflexibility. If anything a thinner sapphire would be less prone to Shatter in some situations. One of the reasons Seiko have stuck with Hardlex in many of their watches is because of stress test superiority in some scenarios. So in some professional situations, Sapphire is not better than Hardened Mineral Crystal ( Hardlex etc etc ) , Seiko MarineMaster pro diving watches are over £1000 and utilise Hardlex.... 

I couldn't disagree more, no evidence in any of that, but neither have I ever tested my theory, and don't plan to. Lol not with my watches.

But yes I know what Seiko has claimed, I'll never listen to a word. It's an excuse not a reason. I'd guess well over 90 percent of their clientele don't do anything more stressing to their watches than any other average Joe does. It would be interesting to see this testing process and see how they determined what they did and be able to intellectualize it all and see if I came up with the same conclusion.

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no evidence.... apart from scientific facts...... you only have to do a bit of basic research into how they are made. I am not championing either one.... Neither are Seiko for instance, they have Pro Diving watches with Hardlex and Sapphire. But the science of Covalent bonding characteristic is High School stuff, its not complicated.

 

High school was ages ago. Lol

 

I only remember short shorts and low cut tops. And I'm not interested in looking into your point. I have my theory, and yours doesn't negate it from what I can tell. Lol so there! Hahahà

 

Edit: okay I looked into it, yes very basic and has zero bearing on the point from what I can see. Sapphire is harder. It's more brittle. But the thinner the worse resistance to impact. Come on how can you not see this?

 

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I think I need to buy some random Sapphire crystals in different thicknesses and do some testing.

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or Speak to a scientist ...... :


Nah, I believe what I can see. Words are worthless.

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8 minutes ago, JayDeep said:

 


Nah, I believe what I can see. Words are worthless.

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So data collected in a lab is pointless info?

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So data collected in a lab is pointless info?

Seeing is believing. That's all. I did however utilize the "ask a scientist" section of NASA website. Seemed cool so I figured I'd give it a shot for fun.

 

I'd rather be the one testing so I had control over the variables. I don't trust others to do it properly. Yes that includes so called professionals. I'm a control freak and trust no one.

 

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You don't know Tom Cruise and John Travolta by any chance do you ?:huh:

 

Hahaha

Nah, Scientology ain't my thing. That requires a faith also. I find faith pathetic. I'm atheist all the way.

 

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