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Steve D UK

How often do you set your watch spot on?

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if you a a repair man or a collector of time pieces,  enjoy the hobby,  sell the problem pieces.  vin

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I use an Android app to track my watches' accuracy, WatchCheck. Great little app, it uses both both NTP signals (www.ntp.org) and my phone's GPS receiver to corroborate correct time. I do NOT trust third party "what time is it" sites, I go to one of the authoritative sources:

https://time.gov/widget/widget.html

I set my watches ahead anywhere from 20 to 40 seconds when they fall behind. I'm testing some to determine how often I need to do this. Lately several of my ETA movements are gaining or losing ±2 secs/day with a combination of wearing and leaving dial up for 12 hrs or more. My Mk II Kingston used to gain about 5 secs/day on the winder, lately it's a bit slower. 

This to me is the joy of automatics. NOT that one is so accurate I hardly have to reset it, but that with wear and rest, they can be checked every few days and as often as not, will not need to be adjusted. 

Adjusting a mechanical watch every night to correct for a few seconds is silly :rolleyes:, someone who's still accustomed to quartz watches. Start tracking your watch's accuracy, leave it dial-up overnight if it needs to "catch up a bit."  A finely made and tuned watch shouldn't need adjustment more often than once a week, less if it's a really great movement. 

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Not to start anything with those who own Rollex watches, but is it true, that they, in general (obviously there must be many that keep spot on time), that they are generally not the  greatest timekeepers, especially relative to their cost. Or is this an old wives' tale?

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Never. As I only wear my 'collection' watches at the weekends, they are just set by the clock on my bedside table....and I don't even know if that's correct....'about then' is good enough for me. My daily beater is a radio controlled Casio, so I don't have to worry about setting that. At my time in life, I don't care about the time, I just pitch up as and when......

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Don't bother making sure that it's to the second

I don't need that type of accuracy to run my life if its within a few seconds then that is good enough for me.

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To the second. I have an el primero which doesn't hack and it's 6 secs fast the gains it back in the box so it's always exact pretty much. 

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Usually when the clocks change, and of course after a battery change.  :biggrin:

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On 27/07/2017 at 19:36, Roger the Dodger said:

Never. As I only wear my 'collection' watches at the weekends, they are just set by the clock on my bedside table....and I don't even know if that's correct....'about then' is good enough for me. My daily beater is a radio controlled Casio, so I don't have to worry about setting that. At my time in life, I don't care about the time, I just pitch up as and when......

I set mine by whatever time shows on Rogers post picture :thumbsup:

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On 27/07/2017 at 02:02, Ted said:

Not to start anything with those who own Rollex watches, but is it true, that they, in general (obviously there must be many that keep spot on time), that they are generally not the  greatest timekeepers, especially relative to their cost. Or is this an old wives' tale?

Sort of true. The COSC certified Rolex keeps good time. Nowadays Rolex go one step further and test them in house as well. But for the price they still sometimes don't keep as good time as cheaper models. My Rolex runs at +1 second per day. But I have an Omega Seamaster (COSC certified as well) that was half the price and runs at +0.5. But sometimes it's actually down to a bit of luck.

I have my watches on rotation and usually have to set them to wear as they have run down. I use BBC news. But then if they start to lose/gain a bit I don't bother to reset as I'll probably rotate to another watch after a few days.

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I rotate watches a lot so by the time I get around to pretty much any mechanical watch it will have stopped and when I set it I like to get it to within a second of standard time (oh, so much fun with those watches that don't hack! (I'm looking at you, Sistem51 and Seiko 5)).

With quartz watches I have a bit of a mixed approach. For those high accuracy watches (Grand Seiko, Twin Quartz, VHP etc) that I time regularly, I reset only once per year because I like to track their performance. The graph I get over the course of a year tells me how much I need to trim their rates. For non-high accuracy watches, I reset them to atomic time whenever they drift by more than about three seconds. For RC and GPS watches, I do a time sync whenever I put one on, even if it appears to have sync'd very recently.

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