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how did we live through the 1970's and 1980's?


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This is sparked off by two things.  On the BBC website today there is this story

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-42324984

Where winter, being born, crossing the road etc where very dangerous things to do, but also my daughter was applying for a Blue Peter badge and she needed to know my favourite moment from the show when I was a boy.  I goggled it to make sure I remembered correctly, but I was shocked by the lack of safety for a children's TV show.  Go to 10 minutes 20 seconds to see Peter Duncan cleaning the clockface Big Ben (Elizabeth tower to those anoraks!)

 

:sign_wtf:

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As a youngster in the early 1970's I was  Out of contact with my parents all day until I decided to come home, no mobile phones those days! Cycle everywhere on a fixed wheel bike with no

I spent a lot of the early 70`s  on another planet      Smoking funny smelling rollups & swallowing strange, mind altering, little tablets, Man!     Later i

I didn't live through them but they always sound a lot of fun even though things were much harder then in many ways Music was certainly better

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7 minutes ago, Roger the Dodger said:

Ol' Fred Dibnah was my favourite....no hi-viz, safety ropes, guard rails or anything.....he just got on with it.

 

Bolton legend.

Saw him blow a chimney up in Leyland when i worked at Leyland Motors. 

We were even allowed to watch it and there was hundreds of us. 

That'd have been late 70's or early 80's

Edited by Turpinr
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45 minutes ago, Turpinr said:

Bolton legend.

Saw him blow a chimney up in Leyland when i worked at Leyland Motors. 

We were even allowed to watch it and there was hundreds of us. 

That'd have been late 70's or early 80's

Went away with friends this year just after Christmas to celebrate the new year. There were a dozen of us and we rented a big house for the week. In our 'Secret Santa', my bloody wife picked me. Rules were £10 max and must be bought from a charity shop. Because I’m often watching him, she bought me the DVD and a Fred style cap!

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1 hour ago, Turpinr said:

Hahaha yeah, Charlie said dont drink paraquat. 

Anybody ever use trichloroethylene?? 

It's banned now but if you ever breathed it in you were high as a kite 

At school a mate of mine made some Trinitrotoluene - he nearly ended up literally as high as a kite.  Charlie never made a cartoon about the danger of playing with explosives :laugh:

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1 hour ago, RTM Boy said:

At school a mate of mine made some Trinitrotoluene - he nearly ended up literally as high as a kite.  Charlie never made a cartoon about the danger of playing with explosives :laugh:

Remember this stuff we used it as a cleaner in textiles had many a happy nightshift after using it

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1 hour ago, RTM Boy said:

At school a mate of mine made some Trinitrotoluene - he nearly ended up literally as high as a kite.  Charlie never made a cartoon about the danger of playing with explosives :laugh:

Haha...that reminded me of working for ICI at the Jeallots Hill research station at Hawtorn Hill, just outside Bracknell. We used to make a compound called Nitrogen tri-iodide, made by dissolving iodine crystals in .880 ammonia solution. After a fairly gentle reaction, we were left with a brown precipitate which had to be kept under the resulting liquid. This precipitate was the Nitrogen tri-iodide, and very unstable it was when dried. The slightest touch would cause it to explode with a sharp bang and a cloud of purple iodine smoke. We used to have fun putting it on work colleagues car exhaust pipes and waiting for the bang as they set off...another ploy was to put a small amount under the rubber buffers on a toilet seat...with hilarious results! There was no explosive force...all the energy was expended in the bang and the cloud of smoke. Would probably be grounds for instant dismissal these days, but that was back in the day when we had fun at work...

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If you've got a spare 20 minutes or so, these two are worth watching....dear ol' Fred, near the end, well over 50 here, demonstrating how to ladder a chimney...so clever, brave and interesting...today all done from a high reach 'cherry picker'..as were a lot of the shots in these films....

 

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I believe that things were far more dangerous in the 50's. Namely lead paint, DDT smog being sprayed by big trucks or helicopters in urban areas, PCB's, asbestos...etc. And here we are. ( Those of my age anyway.)

In the 80's, GenX parents sterilized everything, refused vaccinations for their kids and helped revive and spreading diseases that were once eradicated. ( And you can thank all the internet doctors for spreading myths).

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8 hours ago, BlueKnight said:

I believe that things were far more dangerous in the 50's. Namely lead paint, DDT smog being sprayed by big trucks or helicopters in urban areas, PCB's, asbestos...etc. And here we are. ( Those of my age anyway.)

In the 80's, GenX parents sterilized everything, refused vaccinations for their kids and helped revive and spreading diseases that were once eradicated. ( And you can thank all the internet doctors for spreading myths).

Agree, Mike. These days we wash all our immunity away with far too frequent baths/showers to the point of obsessiveness and use way too many 'sterilising' products to the point that as soon as an infection strikes, we can't cope. Girls wash their hair every day...washing away all the natural oils, then wonder why it's dry and needs conditioner. Showering every day washes away all your natural body oils and again leads to dry skin and the need to apply moisturisers. As young kids in the 60's, we were allowed one bath or shower a week for economical reasons...cost of electricty or coal for heating the water. The rest of the week, we had a flannel wash at the basin every morning. Before that, once a month, a tin bath was dragged into the sitting room in front of the fire, filled with hot water from the copper, then the family bathed in order...dad first, then mum, then the kids, all in the same water.

 

 

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I just can't get the overstated use of hard hats.  Hard hat on a cherry picker??  To protect you from birdsh*t?  Maybe..

We now have to wear hard hats on the jetty??!!??  If there is anything overhead, it will be slung from a crane and anything dropping from there is going to drive the hard hat right into your skull.  Stupid a pointless rules.

Some of these pointless health and saftey rules must be costing industry millions in pointless waste.

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I don't get the hard hat thing either. Sometimes you need them other times they're a damn nuisance. Apart from anything else they block the view of stuff happening overhead. On building sites with cranes and people working above, or where there's maintenance going on above then it's fair enough. 

I go to the one local timber supplier, and if I want to go into the warehouse to look at something I have to wear a hi-viz and helmet.

Haven't been in here for a bit. Hope everybody's OK. 

 

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On 05/02/2018 at 11:46, Biker said:

I just can't get the overstated use of hard hats.  Hard hat on a cherry picker??  To protect you from birdsh*t?  Maybe..

We now have to wear hard hats on the jetty??!!??  If there is anything overhead, it will be slung from a crane and anything dropping from there is going to drive the hard hat right into your skull.  Stupid a pointless rules.

Some of these pointless health and saftey rules must be costing industry millions in pointless waste.

That reminds me of when I managed a document storage company. We acquired a new warehouse in which we stored boxes of documents on 8 metre high shelving, with no access to the public. Our scissor lift was 75cm wide so we set the shelves at 1m apart.

Health and Safety bloke comes along and told us all the shelving had to be 1.1m apart (requiring a massive amount of work and thousands in lost revenue due to the loss of one rack). When we asked why he said “So a wheelchair user can get between the shelves”. 

We almost couldn’t believe it! We said that it was a closed facility and shelves could only be accessed with the scissor lift - something that’s impossible for a wheelchair user to get into. He still said we had to move them. 

We didn’t of course and it was never mentioned again. 

Jobsworth moron sadly. :( 

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On 07/02/2018 at 01:54, JDMdenon said:

Me and 'Tom' both have the same bike. However mines the AJS "lightweight" and I suspect the one in the vid is 250cc. Mine 350! Cracking bike! 

Wouldn't catch me riding that close to the kerb these days. Would get knocked of by all the teenagers in their FIAT 500's

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As a 7 year old child living in Birkenhead I can remember getting two buses to school and also being responsible for taking my 5 year old sister too.

When not at school playing out all day and often wandering a mile or two from home and only returning at "tea time".

I remember once as an 8 year old cycling from where I lived in Prenton down to the docks and Camel Laird shipyard to look at the ships, and "spot" the different funnel markings. My father was cycling home and saw me (I didn't see him) and cycled after me keeping at a discreet distance and took a couple of photos of me staring out over the docks.

Couldn't imagine this now, we had so much freedom   

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8 hours ago, Pyr0 said:

I grew up wandering around the old railway tracks, monks tunnels and docks in Birkenhead too :)

Good times. Swimming in the docks, fishing iin Birkenhead park, getting up to no good lol

Monks tunnels still had lines in them when I was there, son't think the trains were still running though

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There were no trains running, but I don't remember seeing any lines running through the monks tunnels when I was there. I was born in 76, so maybe around the late 80s early 90s

I still live in Birkenhead, but it's been a few decades since I was down that way.

We used to go through the argyle industrial estate and across all the derelict ground.

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I used to play on the Spey viaduct in the 1960s when it was still used by steam trains. Bonus points if you climbed over the arch. Kept in for a fortnight if your dad caught you.

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It's part of a footpath now.

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We also used to scrounge salmon off the fishermen who had a "floating" shed for transporting their nets on the river.

 

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