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jsud2002

Linux or Windows

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I started many years ago with DOS then windows 3.1 and slowly over the years progressed though the many updates finally ending up on Windows 10 . Recently though I have thought either my laptop was running slow or was it the operating system so I partitioned my hard drive and  installed Linux Mint yesterday as a dual boot to run alongside windows . 

Been using Linux today and wow what an improvement in speed the only problem I have is it is totally different to what I am used to . 

Enjoying it and it is definitely making the old grey matter do its job learning . I plan on sticking with Linux and just wondered if any other members have any experience with Linux . Cheers John  

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I use both John.:(

I'm mostly a Windows user but often use Linux to extend the life of a low powered machine that can still have a purpose.

I started out with the Amiga and was quite fluent in Amiga DOS, when the Amiga was abandoned due to criminal negligence(imho), I moved to WinTel machines.

Over the years I tried several Linux distros on older machines to revitalise them (temporarily). I used Man/drake/ driva, PCLOS, Xandros and others.

I don't want to get into fixing computer issues and faults anymore, I've done that for over twenty years on the Amiga and Windows and I think I've earned  rest at my age.:laugh:

I have Peppermint Linux 8 installed on a Toshiba Satellite that has a dire AMD E300 APU inside it. Windows 7 was upgraded to Win10 and the same issue reared its head. Windows update swamped the low power CPU and Widows antimalware executive checks every file downloaded from the Windows update server(why, the files come from MS, ffs?).

The Tosh has a nice screen, 6 Gigs of RAM and an optical drive, it can play DVDs and stream at 720p all day, unless Windows update and the virus checker kicks in:rolleyes:.

Peppermint 8 seems competent, works well, doesn't swamp the machine when I update it (a manual option, unlike Windows), and it looks nice enough.

If Peppermint breaks I won't know how to fix it, I'll have to ask the Peppermint community for help. I'm used to community, I was and still am an Amigan. Although, my only current vestige of an Amiga is Cloanto  Amiga Forever7.

The Amiga was a product, but it always had community, many of whom became important contributors to  the wider IT infrastructure. The Amiga community still exists and deserves respect for its incredible loyalty.

Windows and Apple/ Mac are products (or maybe we are) they have a community of critics and supporters willing to offer help to those who don't get the help they need from the respective corporation.

Linux on the other hand is not a product, it's a community built OS and support environment. Mostly forum supported, so we know what that means.:rolleyes:

There will always be gobshites and trolls on forums, even Linux ones. Ignore them (as you should). There will always be someone there to help if you are honest and respectful on a Linux forum. That might actually work on any forum, come to think of it.:yes:

Linux is a good thing, in my opinion. It keeps the world turning in more ways than most people know.

 

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It depends on what you want to do,with it. If you've got an old low powered laptop that you only want for web surfing and YouTube then bang a Linux distro on it.

Like it or not, virtually all third party line of business applications are MS centric. Want to run Sage for instance,  then it's got to be MS.

That said, the rise of cloud/browser based applications will render the dependence on a particular platform, if not obsolete, then certainly more flexible.

 

14 hours ago, Stan said:

Linux is a good thing, in my opinion. It keeps the world turning in more ways than most people know

That, and don't forget it's daddy, Unix.

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I only use my laptop mainly for browsing the web and streaming music , I probably could do with just using a tablet instead of a laptop. 

This Linux is very new to me but I have accepted the challenge of learning to use it. 

I am contemplating buying an old laptop just to put linux onto but just a cheap laptop and a smaller one not a big 15" 

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What I have found to be a weakness of Linux is the slowness/lack of development of support for hardware. Driver support for Linux has improved among companies, but you sometimes encounter a "Can't get there from here." situation with Linux. On the Linux fora there is a phenomenon among a number of long time Linux only users. They try to be helpful, but they have taken their approach to an academic level, where the technical possibility of something working outweighs the practical application. In short, a simple 97 step process of work-a-rounds and cheats will get your specific piece of hardware installed, but it will be functionally crippled.

Where the real payoff for Linux lies, is with hardware/software developers manufacturing and installing very specific end user systems. Things like information kiosks and the like. Less capital spent on license fees, more spent on development.

Later,
William

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56 minutes ago, William_Wilson said:

Where the real payoff for Linux lies, is with hardware/software developers manufacturing and installing very specific end user systems. Things like information kiosks and the like. Less capital spent on license fees, more spent on development.

I'm not particularly up to date with the Linux world, but the thing that would stop that happening would be the thing that makes Linux great - with it being open source and always under development many serious developers who want to throw a lot of money at a project will not see it as a stable platform for investment.

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53 minutes ago, Wheelnut69 said:

I'm not particularly up to date with the Linux world, but the thing that would stop that happening would be the thing that makes Linux great - with it being open source and always under development many serious developers who want to throw a lot of money at a project will not see it as a stable platform for investment.

I am speaking of situations that are, for the most part, closed environments. Users have limited access and the final compiled O.S. and applications are stored on EPROM. They are not subject to the vagaries of the Linux development community. Other examples of this type of use are tradeshow info booths and museum exhibits.

Later,
William

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On 4/14/2018 at 15:05, jsud2002 said:

I started many years ago with DOS then windows 3.1 and slowly over the years progressed though the many updates finally ending up on Windows 10 . Recently though I have thought either my laptop was running slow or was it the operating system so I partitioned my hard drive and  installed Linux Mint yesterday as a dual boot to run alongside windows . 

Been using Linux today and wow what an improvement in speed the only problem I have is it is totally different to what I am used to . 

Enjoying it and it is definitely making the old grey matter do its job learning . I plan on sticking with Linux and just wondered if any other members have any experience with Linux . Cheers John  

Spent years working at Red Hat using Red Hat Enterprise Linux, the Fedora Core OS that Red Hat supports as a source for innovation. Have used the Gnome and KDE desktops, I'm not sure liked what they did with Gnome, KDE is the power desktop and possibly more famliar to Windows users. Of course, the nice thing about Linux is that can choose your desktop environment, and still run over the core operating system.

The modern user-friendly distributions like Ubuntu and Mint free the user from having to deal with the shell/terminal much, but if you were familiar with MS-DOS (or DR-DOS, my OS for years when I finally bought a Gateway 2000 386DX) then the Linux shell shouldn't be too intimidating. 

FYI, if you have a USB 3.0 port on your system, and a flash drive with 4GB or more free space, you can make a "Live USB" bootable stick with persistent storage to boot up from, without disturbing your Windows partition(s). There's a Windows utility for Fedora Core that lets you download various builds (lean, thick, standalone), then burn the build to a flash drive with your specified amount of persistent storage. Very easy. Then set up your PC's BIOS to boot from the USB port, and voila ... you can play with Linux all you like, then shut down and go back to Window. 

I had to toil with Libre Office for years, tolerated it, but never gave up my MS Office and Adobe app chops. GIMP ... blech; hated it.  

My primary system lately is a Chromebook. Does what I need it to do. 

Edited by Chromejob
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6 hours ago, William_Wilson said:

What I have found to be a weakness of Linux is the slowness/lack of development of support for hardware. Driver support for Linux has improved among companies, but you sometimes encounter a "Can't get there from here." situation with Linux. On the Linux fora there is a phenomenon among a number of long time Linux only users. They try to be helpful, but they have taken their approach to an academic level, where the technical possibility of something working outweighs the practical application. In short, a simple 97 step process of work-a-rounds and cheats will get your specific piece of hardware installed, but it will be functionally crippled.

Where the real payoff for Linux lies, is with hardware/software developers manufacturing and installing very specific end user systems. Things like information kiosks and the like. Less capital spent on license fees, more spent on development.

Later,
William

This has been a crippling hindrance to Linux dev's all along. A simple peripheral like a printer has its driver protected by a pointless protectionism that can only hinder the sales of the product. The same issue existed during the Amiga era, why allow no driver availability for an alternative OS?

Either peripheral manufacturers want to be paid to release the driver source code or are prevented from doing so by MS or Apple/Mac licence agreements?  I find that self defeating and slightly sinister.:(

I suspect we have to make the best of what's available, most Amiga and Linux developers did, and still do a great job. IMO.

Despite the fact I'd prefer to no longer "drill down" into computer issues and operating systems, I do love the darned things.:wink:

 

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I'd been a PC Windows user for as long as I've been using PCs but cut my teeth with Linux on various server projects (VPN sever, home cloud server, ...). Then I decided I wanted a nice small laptop and settled on wanting a Thinkpad X-series. They are, however, eye-wateringly expensive when new. So I found a refurbisher offering X230s for a very good price, with Win7 pre-installed. However, after upgrading to Win10, the machine was suffering from slow-downs during updates and generally being a pain, even though it's not exactly an under-powered machine, so I put Xubuntu Linux on it as an experiment. Being an older model, (X)ubuntu has all the necessary hardware support, everything worked perfectly straight away and the machine is whizzing along. I didn't want to install a dual-boot system so I installed Win10 in a virtual machine instead in case I need it. It it very convenient to have Windows running in a window while having the host system available at the same time. However, other than starting it now and again to run updates, the Windows VM hardly ever gets used.

When my better half started a Uni course recently, I got her a refurbished X230 and put Xubuntu on it straight away. I was worried that she wouldn't be happy with it, but I couldn't have been more wrong. She loves it and it does everything she needs it to do.

I still have Win10 on a desktop machine, but only really use it now for the rare times I need some speciality software with no Linux equivalent (specifically, once a year for my tax return). I'm planning to move this machine to Linux as well, to keep it going longer, and banishing Windows to a virtual machine there too. Just a matter of finding the time.

All in all, I could almost do without Windows for my private use now. Just the speciality software that still needs it.

 

On 15/04/2018 at 19:40, Wheelnut69 said:

I'm not particularly up to date with the Linux world, but the thing that would stop that happening would be the thing that makes Linux great - with it being open source and always under development many serious developers who want to throw a lot of money at a project will not see it as a stable platform for investment.

I don't agree with this at all. Various companies (Canonical, Red Hat, ...) provide professional support for Linux. Open source doesn't mean that it's only hobbyists working on it and a number of large companies contribute to developing it further, e.g. by employing the key developers, and providing support. Where I work, most of the backend systems (including critical systems) are running on some sort of Linux or other and there are plenty of serious companies making large investments and good money with it. It's almost exclusively the office PCs that are on Windows, mainly due to Microsoft's office software suite.

Edited by wotsch
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Last night I decided I had had enough of Windows 10 as my laptop was running really slow so I created a windows recovery USB (just in case ) then wiped the laptop completely clean and did a fresh install of Linux Ubuntu . Laptop now running a lot faster almost as if it was a new one and I am finding Linux Ubuntu quite enjoyable . Still a few tweaks required here and there but all in all pretty good . 

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Your laptop may have been running particularly slowly yesterday as it might well have been in the process of downloading and installing the latest big Windows 10 update to version 1803.  All my W10 boxes picked up this update yesterday after patch Tuesday.

Still, Ubuntu is a decent Linux alternative, or Kubuntu if you want a simpler learning curve. Enjoy :)

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4 minutes ago, rhaythorne said:

Your laptop may have been running particularly slowly yesterday as it might well have been in the process of downloading and installing the latest big Windows 10 update to version 1803.  All my W10 boxes picked up this update yesterday after patch Tuesday.

Still, Ubuntu is a decent Linux alternative, or Kubuntu if you want a simpler learning curve. Enjoy :)

It has been running slow for some time now but yesterday was definitely slower so I guess it must have been down to the update. 

I will see how I get on with Linux before making any rash decisions to go back to windows. 

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