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The Mystery Bidder

Flowers/Plants

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Hope no-one minds but I decided to make a new topic for flowers and plants.  There was one from 2012, however, most of the pictures were unavailable due to problems with the 3rd party image hosting sites.  :thumbsup:

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Ok...We all like roses, right? Reds, pinks, yellows...even white. But have you ever seen one of these? Caught on camera in Spain a few years ago, I give you Rosa floribunda 'Abracadabra'...

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13 hours ago, Roger the Dodger said:

What would you like to see first...common or exotic?

 

I do love a rose.  I think my favourite flower.  :king:

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One of the plants I've always admired is the large flowered Hibiscus that you see in Spain, Portugal and other places. This is the one that Hawaiian girls are often pictured with in their hair. Unfortunately, it's not hardy in the UK and needs to be overwintered in a heated greenhouse/conservatory, but is quite happy outside during the summer. The plants are rarely available over here, but if I see one, I'll buy it to add to my collection. All these plants are raised from cuttings, as the flowers rarely produce seed. These are Hibiscus rosa-chinensis....not to be confused with Hibiscus syriacus, which is perfectly hardy in the UK.

Orange singles.

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Orange double.

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Yellows.

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Reds and pinks

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White single (here with others in the collection)

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White double.

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While posting the exotic Hibiscus pics above, I mentioned the other variety, Hybiscus syriacus, which is perfectly hardy in the UK, and given a south facing position, will give outstanding floral dislpays from late July through until the end of September. There are plenty of named varieties to choose from, mostly singles, but some doubles are available. These are from my collection.

Hibiscus syriacus 'Blue Bird'. This is a single variety, and one of the best blue flowers out there. It sometimes goes under the name of 'Oiseau Bleu'.large.002_zpsb43cfc98.jpg.7e13a0ca71011445c8ee7b3129cd9d34.jpg

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This single pink is called 'Woodbridge'

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This double is 'Blue Chiffon'....

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....and this one is 'White Chiffon'.

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Finally, this very pale pink, with deep red centre is 'Red Heart'.

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How about a couple of unusual ones? The first is the 'Mouse Plant' (Arisarum proboscideum). Flowering late spring, this relative of the common 'Lords and Ladies' has a 'flower' that looks remarkably like the back end of a mouse, complete with tail. The actual flower is insignificant and contained within the mouse shaped spathe.

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The second is the 'Snake's Head Fritillary', (Fritillaria meleagris) . This spring flowering bulb can naturalise in the correct conditions. The name comes from the flower in bud which resembles a snakes head. When open, it has a pretty checkerboard pattern to the maroon bell. There is also a white variety.

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Should I have started a new "Weeds" thread? :laughing2dw:

Perhaps, but I came across this today. How it has survived, on the headland, in the face of some 50+ mph winds off the North Sea, I have no idea.

 

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Steve.

 

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I love it when the buds are swelling, It means the winter is on it's way out!!

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Some of my favourite plants..

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John :thumbsup:

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I bought this Acer off a mate for £100, He was moving to Scotland and couldn't take it with him!!

He bought it fifteen years ago from Morrisons for £1.49 but can't remember which variety it is!!, This is the colour it is now, It goes blood red in autumn!

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I've seen similar trees at a garden centre near to me for £500, They're as tall but not much width to them!!


John :thumbsup:

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Here's something a bit unusual...it's a condition that plants sometimes get and it's called 'Fascination', from the Latin for 'band' or 'stripe'. It occurs when the growing tip or meristem of the plant is affected by a virus, injury, bacterial infection or even frost. Instead of producing a round stem or flower, the growth becomes distorted, usually resulting in flattened stems or elongated or multiple flowers such as these examples...

Facination of a Dandelion stem....

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...and this is facination of a flower (on the R)

Image result for fascination in plants

I've seen this many times over the years at work, but last Autumn, noticed some developing Hazel catkins that had become fascinated by some means or another. Instead of producing just the normal two or three catkins, this bud produced over 40. The first pic was taken back in October of last year, when they were developing, and the second shots were taken this spring when they opened up. It was quite an unusual sight!

October 2018.

Hazel catkins.

March 2019.

Hazel catkins.

Hazel catkins.

@johnbaz...Is your Acer the same as this one, which has very bright orange leaves as they emerge, later fading to lime green, then finally red? If so, this variety that I had at work was called 'Orange Beauty'.

Acer palmatum 'Orange Beauty'.

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Some pics of my Wisteria that I took back in April then forgot to post! There are two varieties growing together here, a blue and a pink, both Japanese cultivars (Macrobotrys) as opposed to the more common Chinese (Chinensis) varieties.

Wisteria 2019.

Wisteria 2019.

Wisteria 2019.

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Yesterday, I took some pics of the beautiful Passiflora caerulea, more commonly known as the blue Passion flower. The name 'Passion' flower comes not from any romantic connotation, but refers to the Passion of Christ, and the flower is said to have religious connections in many faiths. It varies from culture to culture, but parts of the flower and the foliage are said to represent the suffering of Christ.

The 3 stigma at the top represent the three nails which held Him to the cross, while the 5 stamens below represent the five sacred wounds (one in each of His hands and feet and the wound in His side from the spear) The corolla, or ring of purple tipped filaments is the crown of thorns He wore, while the 5 sepals and 5 petals represent the 10 faithful apostles (omitting Judas and Peter who denied knowing Him)

Passion Flower.

The stem that supports the stigmas and stamens is said to represent the pillar to which He was tied for flogging and the ovary ( the small green swelling between the stigmas and stamens) represents the sponge of vinegar offered to Him to drink.

Passion Flower.

The climbing tendrils represent the whips used for the flagellation....

Passion Flower.

....while the palmate leaves represent the hands of His persecutors, and the individual leaf lobes refer to the shape of the spear used to pierce His side.

Passion Flower.

Finally, the fruit represents the world He came to save.

Passion Flower.

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