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Flowers/Plants


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Out in the garden again today, and more lovely flowers starting to show.

Various Osteospermums...this one is '3D Violet Ice'

Osteospermum: '3D Violet Ice'.

'3D Purple'...

Osteospermum: '3D Purple'.

'Voltage Yellow'...

Osteospermum: 'Voltage Yellow'.

'Purple Sun'.

Osteospermum: 'Purple Sun'.

'Blue Eyed Beauty'.

Osteospermum: 'Blue Eyed Beauty'.

This lovely plant is called 'Angel's Fishing Rods' (Dierama pulcherrimum).

Dierama pulcherrimum.

Dierama pulcherrimum.

Dierama pulcherrimum.

Good old Pot Marigold (Calendula officianalis)

Calendula officianalis.

Everlasting Ice Plant (Delosperma cooperi)

Delosperma cooperi.

A couple of Roses...this one is 'Sheila's Scent', in bud with a bit of greenfly...I better sort that! :laughing2dw:

Rose: 'Sheila's Scent'.

 and open...

Rose: 'Sheila's Scent'.

This one is 'Special Grandma'.

Rose 'Special Grandma'.

A few more double 'Love in a mist' (Nigella damascena)

 

Nigella damascena.

Nigella damascena.

Nigella damascena.

This is the inflated seed pod that develops later.

Nigella damascena seed pod.

@spinynorman  I saw your comment about keeping the Tropical Hibiscus, and the difficulty overwintering them here in the UK...I only managed to get mine through two winters in a heated greenhouse, so I know how hard it is. However, there is a Hibiscus (Hibiscus syriacus) which is perfectly hardy here. I did a post about them earlier in this thread...about my 4th or 5th post I think...:thumbsup:

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I love it when the buds are swelling, It means the winter is on it's way out!! Some of my favourite plants..     John 

One of the plants I've always admired is the large flowered Hibiscus that you see in Spain, Portugal and other places. This is the one that Hawaiian girls are often pictured with in their hair. Unfort

Back Garden Yesterday

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The Mimulus are just starting to flower now. Lovers of damp, shady places, these Monkey flowers as they are known (due to the fanciful shape of a monkey's face) come in all sorts of shades and colours, many with contrasting spots and blotches. It's also called Monkey Musk.

Mimulus: Monkey flower.

Mimulus: Monkey flower.

Mimulus: Monkey flower.

Mimulus: Monkey flower.

Mimulus: Monkey flower.

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Common Spotted Orchids (Dactylorhiza fuchsii) just starting to flower...these grow wild along the stream behind my house. These specimens were all growing in the garden when we moved in, 25 years ago, and still self seed all over the place! It's Britain's most common wild orchid and as a point of interest, is the county flower of West Lothian/Linlithgowshire. It goes by several local names...'Adam and Eve, Adder's flower, Curlie-daddy and Dead Man's finger.

Common Spotted Orchid.

Common Spotted Orchid.

Common Spotted Orchid.

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'Er poppies and Roses are oot!

 

 

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Dunno what these are.. Are these berries edible?  Anyone?

Sorry about the crappy phone pics

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WOO-HOO!!

One of my cacti have thrown two flower stems with more to come, never had this happen before... Ever.

Chuffed to bits. :thumbs_up::clap:

 

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On 16/06/2020 at 21:11, Biker said:

 

Dunno what these are.. Are these berries edible?  Anyone?

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I think ( @Roger the Dodger...) the yellow is a flag iris and the berries are from Ivy - so best not eat them as I guess they’re poisonous. 

1 hour ago, Biker said:

WOO-HOO!!

One of my cacti have thrown two flower stems with more to come, never had this happen before... Ever.

Chuffed to bits. :thumbs_up::clap:

 

20200621_125924.jpg

 

That’s great. I have 2 large terrariums, one sealed with humidity loving plants and mosses, and one open with cacti - they’ve had babies but not flowered yet. 

Edited by DJJazzyJeff
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4 minutes ago, Roger the Dodger said:

Yep...I agree. The top one is a yellow flag iris, normally found near, or even in, water, and as DJ JJ says, the berries are Ivy, and poisonous.

I think the iris is on the drive which has a burn running beside it and a couple of patches get heavily waterlogged every winter.

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Another day in the garden, and more flowers opening up now...

Various poppies...these first ones are variations of the common poppy.

Poppy.  Poppy.  Poppy.

These are Californian poppies, Eschscholzia californica.

Poppy, Californian.  Poppy, Californian.

And these are Opium poppies, Papaver somniferum.

Poppy, Opium.  Poppy, Opium.

A couple of Nasturtiums are out...

Nasturtium.  Nasturtium.

These next ones are called 'Mountain Garland' and are native to California. They always remind me of butterflies. They belong to the Clarkia family and the double versions are also known as Godetias.

Clarkia.  Clarkia.  Clarkia.

Clarkia.  Clarkia.  Clarkia.

Next are some ornamental Toadflax, Linaria sp.

Ornamental Toadflax.  Ornamental Toadflax.

..and a couple of Flax. The normal blue flowered Flax is grown for the linseed oil produced by the seeds, and the fibres from the dried stems, used to make linen. Down here in the South, you often see fields of blue flax being grown. These are red/pink flowered versions.

Flax, pink.  Flax, scarlet.

Various coloured cornflowers...

Cornflower.  Cornflower.  Cornflower. 

Cornflower.

Corncockle, a wild flower of meadows, sadly rather rare in the wild these days...

Corncockle.

A couple of Stonecrops, Sedum sp.

Stonecrop.  Stonecrop.

And finally, some Pot Marigolds, Calendula officianalis.

Calendula.  Calendula.  Calendula.

 

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Todays walk in the countryside revealed a few wild flowers...

This is Weld, Reseda luteola (aka Dyer's Rocket), a biennial plant that provides a yellow dye for cloth.

It used to be grown commercially and belongs to the Mignonette family.

Weld (aka Dyer's Rocket) Reseda luteoala

Weld (aka Dyer's Rocket) Reseda luteoala

Next, I found some Tufted Vetch, Vicia cracca. This is a Legume and belongs to the Pea family.

Tufted Vetch (Vicia cracca)

This is Hedge Bindweed, Calystegia sepium, and one of the worst weeds, apart from Ground Elder, that you could ever get in your garden.

Its long, white underground roots break at the slightest tug, and will regenerate from the smallest piece left in the ground.

The only way to eradicate it completely is repeated applications of a Glyphosate based weedkiller. The flower looks like a white 'Morning Glory'.

It used to known as 'Bellbine'.

 

 Hedge Bindweed (Calystegia sepium).

Hedge Bindweed (Calystegia sepium).

Next, I came across some Greater Burdock, Arctium lappa. This is a biennial plant (ie. it forms a flat rosette, tight to the ground in its first year, then grows up high, flowers, sets seed and then dies in its second year)

The familiar burrs that will stick to your clothes are just forming now...you can see the hooks on the modified bracts.

The hook and loop fastener 'Velcro' was based/invented on the characteristics of this plant.

Greater Burdock. (Arctium lappa)

Next, I came across some young Teasel, Dipsacus fullonum. This is another biennial, only flowering in its second year. It was once used to raise or tease the knap on certain fabrics, hence its common name.

It is an important plant for wild birds that love its seeds, especially Goldfinches.

It is reputed to be partially carnivorous, the lower leaves (in the second year) being joined at the base and trapping rainwater, into which insects fall and are absorbed as food.

Teasel. (Dipsacus fullonum)

Teasel

The lake I walked beside yielded a few more...This is Water Mint, Mentha aquatica, a really fragrant mint.

Water Mint. (Mentha aquatica)

Water Forget-Me-Not, Myosotis scorpioides, with its beautiful, delicate china blue flowers...

Water Forget-Me-Not. (Myosotis scorpioides)

Water Forget-Me-Not. (Myosotis scorpioides)

Purple Loosestrife, Lythrum salicaria, a familiar waterside plant.

Purple Loosestrife. (Lythrum salicaria) 

Indian Balsam, Impatiens glandulifera, the plant with the exploding seed capsules.

From its Latin name, it can be seen to be a member of the 'Busy Lizzie' family.

Indian Balsam. (Impatiens glandulifera)

And finally, Musk Mallow, Malva moschata.

 Musk Mallow. (Malva moschata)

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3 hours ago, Biker said:

Got nowt exciting going on in our garden at the moment except for a plethora of foxglove

Save some seed...it'll take two years until they flower...the Foxglove is another biennial. The first year, it's a small plant...in the second year it suddenly rises as a fully grown plant, flowers, sets seed then dies....collect the seed and sow again.

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Will the seeds self-sow if the plants are left undisturbed?

I want to leave a couple of sections in the garden completely wild, except for me pulling out the longer grass stalks.

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On 21/06/2020 at 22:56, Biker said:

WOO-HOO!!

One of my cacti have thrown two flower stems with more to come, never had this happen before... Ever.

Chuffed to bits. :thumbs_up::clap:

 

20200621_125924.jpg

That's great!

I really like cacti and have some that have succeeded and some that just died on me. I bought a couple more the other day when I was in Bkk. 

But when they flower, it is special. This little feller, which is really prickly, is about an inch and a half tall and all of a sudden, this time last year, almost to the day, it suddenly flowered and the flower lasted for ages. I must check if there is any sign of the same happening now? 

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5 hours ago, Biker said:

Will the seeds self-sow if the plants are left undisturbed?

I want to leave a couple of sections in the garden completely wild, except for me pulling out the longer grass stalks.

Yes, they will. Remember, it will be two years before they flower, as they are biennials. The first year, the seedlings will form a ground hugging rosette...in the second year, they will grow up and flower.

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The garden flowers continue to bloom...

Candytuft, Iberis sp.
Candytuft.   Candytuft.

Yellow Delosperma.
Delosperma.

More ornamental toadflax, Linaria sp.
Ornamental toadflax.

Ornamental toadflax.

Angelica flowerheads.
Angelica.  Angelica.

Angelica.

Wild viola.
Wild viola.

Hibiscus 'Blue Bird'.
Hibiscus syriacus.

'Blue Chiffon'
Hibiscus syriacus.

'Woodbridge'
Hibiscus syriacus.

'Hamabo'
Hibiscus syriacus.

 

 

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Hi all

My daughter in law bought me this (Aonium I think) years ago, It's become really top heave due to becoming leggy!!

If I chopped it halfway down I presume it will throw shoots out and start again but if I planted the top, Would it take root?, I have some other succulents that have had bits break off that have started putting out roots whilst not even in compost!!

yEQTNoj.jpg

 

It tends to suffer wooly aphid quite often but the fairy liquid and warm water sorts it!!

 

Actually, I just looked on youtube and it seems these are dead easy to propogate so i'll be getting (hopefully!) two plants from this!!

 

 

John :)

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1 hour ago, John_D said:

Can anyone tell me what this is? It appears to have been seeded by the birds in a pot left in the garden?

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John....

That is a plant commonly known as 'Self Heal', (Prunella vulgaris), John. It can be a serious lawn weed where it forms dense, spreading mats and seemingly avoids the lawnmower blades. In a pot, or border, however it can get quite tall...up to 30cm.

https://www.first-nature.com/flowers/prunella-vulgaris.php

https://www.gardenersworld.com/how-to/solve-problems/self-heal/#:~:text=Self-heal (Prunella vulgaris),ensure survival of its species.

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11 hours ago, Roger the Dodger said:

That is a plant commonly known as 'Self Heal', (Prunella vulgaris), John. It can be a serious lawn weed where it forms dense, spreading mats and seemingly avoids the lawnmower blades. In a pot, or border, however it can get quite tall...up to 30cm.

https://www.first-nature.com/flowers/prunella-vulgaris.php

https://www.gardenersworld.com/how-to/solve-problems/self-heal/#:~:text=Self-heal (Prunella vulgaris),ensure survival of its species.

Well it looks like it Roger, BUT all the pictures I can find of the flowers show them being stacked one upon another like this..

534-1000-90.jpg

My plant has a single flower head...

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  • 2 weeks later...

The garden continues to bloom...

More ornamental toadflaxes (Linaria sp).

Ornamental toadflax

Ornamental toadflax

Ornamental toadflax

Ornamental toadflax

Morning Glories.

Morning Glory

Morning Glory

Morning Glory

Morning Glory

Calendula (Pot Marigolds)
Calendula

Calendula

Calendula

Zinnia.
Zinnia.

Cosmos.
Cosmos.

Cosmos.

Cosmos.

Cosmos.

A pure white poppy.
Poppy.

Convolvulus...these always look to me as though someone hand painted them...
Convulvulus.

Convulvulus.

and a new Hibiscus added to the collection, Hibiscus syriacus x paramutabilis 'Walberton's Rose Moon'. This hybrid is a cross between H.syriacus and H. paramutabilis and combines the hardiness of syriacus with the huge (5 inch +) flowers of paramutabilis. The flowers resemble the more ornate ones of the tropical species, rosa chinensis, which isn't hardy in the UK.

Hibiscus syriacus.

 

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looking for expert guidance here.

Anyone identify these? (Roger?)

 

I think this cheeky chappie might be a weed but I loved the leaf pattern

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Big red daisies..

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Lily?

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Daisy/poppy look a like

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The red flowers with dark foliage and the big pink bush

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What're the yellow ones in the middle?

20200726_162334.jpg

Edited by Biker
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