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Tools Of The Trade In The Past


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6 hours ago, BondandBigM said:

@johnbaz 

Back in the day around the time when I visited your Super Gun factory on a regular basis we picked up a contract to do some testing for Rolls Royce Derby. 

This involved cylindrical grinding so I bought a couple of grinders from Myford. Their works, like yours, was like stepping back into the 50's, proper old school that you just don't see these days. 

But they had moved with the times while still manufacturing their small trade mark bench top lathes. 

Lot-13---01-23.JPG

 

My favourite small grinding m/cs are Jones and Shipman surface grinders which are little jewels imo

I always liked Matrix Churchill External (cylindrical) grinders too. 

One of the Churchills i worked on was 70+ years old, mind you the bed was bu66ered so i had to keep casings the taper. 

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I was up in the loft a few days ago looking for a watch that I knew was buried in some box or other, and found some of the tools of my trade, long since superseded by fancy GPS instruments, portable a

I love tools and using them, Not for my job but I have a few lathes to play with as a hobby, Trouble is the only one that's set up for use is an old flat cone pulley type that has wear in the bed, It'

These are the sort of tools I have been working with for the past 51 years.    Sorry for double photo    

14 hours ago, johnbaz said:

Hi Vinn

It was originally a leather belt but it broke so one of our fitters gave me the stuff that's fitted, It's some kind of vulcanised braid, It's stiffer due to being almost double the thickness of the leather one, It was a bit awkward fastening the clawed fittings on to the end that takes the pin to join the ends together!!

 

The Logan sounds nice :notworthy:

 

 

John :thumbsup:

    John;  leather worked for years.  now its time move on.   the flat side of cog belts,  would be a good replacement.  i'll   work on that.  vin

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As an addendum to the above (and because I couldn't take any pics 'till today) here are some old tools that I made when I worked at Compair BroomWade, the compressor makers back in the seventies. Working in the maintainance dept., there were always slack periods, and we would make our own tools up from bits of scrap that were lying around.

Three screwdrivers...the top one has a handle made from a piece of aluminium bar, turned and knurled on a lathe. The shaft is a piece of mmild steel rod with a bit holder brazed onto it. The second one also has an ally handle, but I fluted this one in a milling machine, before turning. The last one is a T bar screwdriver for applying extra torque, made out of mild steel again.

Old Tools.

Next are a couple of home made tap wrenches, large and small. We fitters all had our own versions.

Old Tools.

A surface scraper for removing old bits of gasket from mating surfaces, made out of an old file with a piece of tungsten carbide brazed to the end. We used to get the tool grinders to sharpen these on their diamond grinding wheels. Below is a key drift, also made out of an old file (file steel is good for making tools as it's hard). This was used to remove the key that held a wheel or pulley on a shaft. You put the pointed end between the key end and the pulley hub and tapped it with a hammer to remove the key.

Old Tools.

A home made drill stand (imperial) made out of a block of aluminium.

Old Tools.

Finally, an unusual one. There used to be a couple of old submariners who looked after the boilers, and one of them showed me one of these tools that he still used at work. It's a wheel valve wrench, used to tighten and loosen wheel valves. It will fit several sizes of valve, and is a really simple piece of kit. I made this one in the welding shop, heating and bending the steel rod to get the right shape on an anvil.

Old Tools.

Old Tools.

We don't have any large wheel valves here, but I found a smaller one to show how it works in principle. The hook goes over one of the wheel spokes, and the short end bears on the rim to give really good leverage.

Old Tools.

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3 hours ago, Roger the Dodger said:

as an addendum to the above (and because I couldn't take any pics 'till today) here are some old tools that I made when I worked at Compair BroomWade, the compressor makers back in the seventies. Working in the maintainance dept., there were always slack periods, and we would make our own tools up from bits of scrap that were lying around.

One of the sad things from my recent house move was having to get rid of chests full of this stuff, I Had the same home made tap wrenches, screwdrivers etc. Roller cabs full of heavy plant tools, torque multipliers, and so on.

Any of you guys that's worked offshore know what this is ?

large.20180910_210919_kindlephoto-248865

Makes a great paperweight. :laughing2dw:

Edited by WRENCH
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On 09/09/2018 at 15:18, Roger the Dodger said:

When I first started as chippy on the buildings, everyone used a 'Yankee' spiral screwdriver which you pushed down on to screw in the fixing.

Image result for Yankee screwdriver

Nowadays, we all use impact drivers to do the same job, but much faster.

Image result for makita impact driver

Yankee ratchet spiral screwdrivers are really quite collectable . I recently bought a NOS model 130 from eBay sealed in pack from the 1980s. Great quality. Of course impact drivers for speed but Yankees seemed like witchcraft back in the day.

Gary

 

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3 hours ago, WRENCH said:

One of the sad things from my recent house move was having to get rid of chests full of this stuff, I Had the same home made tap wrenches, screwdrivers etc. Roller cabs full of heavy plant tools, torque multipliers, and so on.

Any of you guys that's worked offshore know what this is ?

large.20180910_210919_kindlephoto-248865

Makes a great paperweight. :laughing2dw:

I'll go with a gear out of a ball valve ??? 

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8 hours ago, BondandBigM said:

I'll go with a gear out of a ball valve ??? 

Phosphor bronze drive gear out of an air driven RMO pipe cutter, where all components were designed not to cause sparks. These gears wore out really quick, and were always charged out as a consumable when on hire, which always caused arguments with contractors, so I kept this one as keepsake, as a memory of many arguments. :laughing2dw:

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On 09/09/2018 at 15:18, Roger the Dodger said:

When I first started as chippy on the buildings, everyone used a 'Yankee' spiral screwdriver which you pushed down on to screw in the fixing.

Image result for Yankee screwdriver

Nowadays, we all use impact drivers to do the same job, but much faster.

Image result for makita impact driver

Still have my Yankee somewhere, still has a jubilee clip on it to stop it rolling away from you, I was proud as punch when I first got it

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7 hours ago, Robti said:

Still have my Yankee somewhere, still has a jubilee clip on it to stop it rolling away from you, I was proud as punch when I first got it

Never a problem with a flat battery either.:yes:

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15 hours ago, WRENCH said:

Phosphor bronze drive gear out of an air driven RMO pipe cutter, where all components were designed not to cause sparks. These gears wore out really quick, and were always charged out as a consumable when on hire, which always caused arguments with contractors, so I kept this one as keepsake, as a memory of many arguments. :laughing2dw:

Chopped the ends off a few pipes in my day, did a stint here when we had the contract for testing the seam welds of the finished pipes. 

7157350202_d7458e4dee_b.jpg

No phosphor bronze gears though

:laugh: :laugh:

Just good old fashionable hand held burning torches although latterly we upgraded and they were attached to a robot not unlike this.

201504281021048973.jpg

We have a few robots where I'm working now. Both gas cutting and welding set ups. 

 

Edited by BondandBigM
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  • 3 weeks later...
On 09/09/2018 at 15:18, Roger the Dodger said:

When I first started as chippy on the buildings, everyone used a 'Yankee' spiral screwdriver which you pushed down on to screw in the fixing.

Image result for Yankee screwdriver

 

 

Two days before I got married I was still fitting a new chipboard floor in a house we had bought. No electric screwdrivers then so I bought a a Yankee. I was doing it right up to midnight and I ended up with the biggest blister you’ve ever seen on the palm of a hand. It was the Yankee I tell ya! 

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  • 6 months later...

Hughes Noble firefighting branch used in the late 1960's, 1970's and into the 1980's, probably still a few on-the-run now here and there

Maximum 1" aperture and the ability to have a spray at the same time, difficult to adjust under pressure though, the earlier versions were painted differently; red (port) on the spray control to indicate turn to left for on and green (starboard) on the jet control to indicate turn right for on. This later version was from when Hughes Engineering who made the original branches was sold I think to Galena Fire Engineering. I keep meaning to strip it down and paint it red and green with a black body.

large.1235173602_DSC04015s-Copy.jpg.73b019da30a371b515e2b5d02e619b13.jpg

 

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Broadening the scope a little from penknives, I also have this, a multi-tool set with a selection of 9 awls and screwdriver heads, any 5 of which can fit in the handle, along with a saw and hammer that screw onto the top. No identifying marks on any of it, just "Pat. applied for".

Tools

 

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On 24/08/2020 at 11:28, spinynorman said:

Broadening the scope a little from penknives, I also have this, a multi-tool set with a selection of 9 awls and screwdriver heads, any 5 of which can fit in the handle, along with a saw and hammer that screw onto the top. No identifying marks on any of it, just "Pat. applied for".

Tools

 

What a brilliant piece of kit, definitely portable woodworking tools

I moved it to this thread, a better fit :)

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  • 1 month later...

Here's an old mic someone gave me years ago, I'm guessing it's close to being antique.

large.IMG_20201006_113300165.jpg.1a8faceac4db8a46a3ca3b39e88c2b9e.jpg

large.IMG_20201006_113244560.jpg.dca0916395ae08d6ea78757ae41d3a84.jpg

 

A few others I've picked up along the way.

large.IMG_20201006_113115151.jpg.dd03bd931d5750547220724e14c31234.jpg

 

An early digital vernier that I've had from new in 1981. Still working perfectly.

large.IMG_20201006_113448544.jpg.ea56fbd1c202c1d4fb863c5b69079d6f.jpg

large.IMG_20201006_113507833.jpg.bd298d1496f3af2aa8cfdb3874b70898.jpg

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37 minutes ago, Karrusel said:

 

Plenty of old tools knocking about Karrusel Towers :whistle:

...not just watches!

DGsRTH0.jpg

ulxZpOa.jpg

 

Well I know what the first two are...the top pic is a pair of turfing irons...used to slide under, and lift turf. We had some of these on the estate when I worked there. The second pic is a draw knife, usually used in conjunction with a shave horse to make all manner of wooden items from thatching spars to wheel spokes, besom handles etc.

GW200801_p013-4.jpg

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On 29/10/2020 at 13:27, chocko said:

These are the sort of tools I have been working with for the past 51 years. 

Work tools 

36335306374_36050dd6fc_b.jpg36335306374_36050dd6fc_b.jpg

Sorry for double photo  

36982380126_5fa771265c_b.jpg

 

Brilliant, that's some skill :yes:

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At the end of my 5th Form year at school the headmaster gave me this set of BWC drawing instruments in a pigskin and chamois leather folding case. He was given it by the widow of a retired Royal Engineer with instructions to give it to a pupil who would make good use of it. I had done well in my "O" Level mock exam in Engineering Drawing so I was chosen.

I have used them for the last 48 years both at work and personally, although I no longer use the ink pens or attachments, so I think I did the old boy and his widow credit. The set dates from around WW2 and was made by BWC i.e. British Watch Cases Ltd who must have been tasked to produce instruments for the forces. After the war sets also found their way to newly nationalised industries. BWC didn't make them for long as the design and quality, while adequate for war, were a long way behind the quality of instruments produced post war.

large.1519197907_IMAG1937s-Copy.jpg.1909e3b2d460e679d4ddd7670dfd8f95.jpg

     

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