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JoT

Tools Of The Trade In The Past

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I was up in the loft a few days ago looking for a watch that I knew was buried in some box or other, and found some of the tools of my trade, long since superseded by fancy GPS instruments, portable analysers and hand held computers or in some instances combined GPS/Computer, plotters and a myriad of proprietary software.

It makes me feel old looking at them :biggrin: 

Some examples below

The Brunton Compass - Clinometer, fixed on a tripod you could use it to create quite an accurate a map and it was also used hand held for traversing and measuring strike and dip of rock structures. Still used but not anywhere near as extensively as it was. These days you can get a GPS compass clinometer computer which records the position, dip and strike of the rock outcrop and allows you to not only photograph the outcrop but to record the rock type.

P9030161.JPG.c5ea7923c67d850997632e2d07ca3744.JPGP9030159.JPG.80663af19edd7f7f953d9f4750563133.JPGP9030157.JPG.4313e43a5888e9f09db0f019fee0af45.JPG

 

 

Next is the Frieberg Compass - made in East Germany originally it was used primarily for recording strike, dip and linear elements in the field a lot quicker than using the Brunton, I used this compass most often due to working in structurally complicated terrain.

 

P9030164.JPG.9c5c18fb5628ff363934973f55e14be4.JPGP9030165.JPG.17bc5f55ae06f3eadf94a2e192fd2ea8.JPGP9030162.JPG.27dd0a4b746430560910d3225d87bb97.JPG

 

Pedometer made in West Germany and surprisingly accurate on easy ground once you had set it up

P9030173.JPG.356bc55807f011892581fc6631de65ea.JPG

 

Plastic field cards, all this data and more would be on your handheld computer now

P9030171.JPG.363129883905ff295d88821ebce5ce2c.JPG

 

Douglas Protractor - brilliant piece of kit for when you are drawing you map at the end of the day

P9030169.JPG.0a863a57d9c419215838ef80f4fe1b11.JPG

 

HP 11C Calculator - Reverse Polish Notation and pretty standard kit in the early 1980's

P9030166.JPG.ce2b6b509c32661cbb325a0ef7caa662.JPG

 

Slide rule and unit converter

I had the slide rule at school but did use it for work until I got the HP11C, I had a couple of unit convertors lying around my desk which were good for quick reference.

P9030167.JPG.4f71afbd72b1b45049ba04343f3b6899.JPG

P9030168.JPG.10d65f69d37dc9307833ef01e7c3acc9.JPG 

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Can I ask was your trade a surveyor ? I started straight from scgool at 16 as a chain man and progressed up the line and ended up a project manager surveyor in Hong Kong and Mayalsia from 94-98 

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25 minutes ago, JoT said:

It makes me feel old looking at the:biggrin: 

What ? To me that's state of the art technology. 

Still use one of these regularly. Through habit.

MachinistChartsandReference_01.jpg

and "trig" tables.

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25 minutes ago, jsud2002 said:

Can I ask was your trade a surveyor ? I started straight from scgool at 16 as a chain man and progressed up the line and ended up a project manager surveyor in Hong Kong and Mayalsia from 94-98 

I work in the mining industry and spent part of my career as a field geologist, this kit dates from then, there is a bit of crossover as we regularly used things like plane tables, optical squares, levels etc but for regional mapping we only needed to be accurate to a few metres and for more detailed work we would normally cut and peg surveyed lines. Surveying is also a much changed trade, when I did a surveying module at university we had transit theodolites with vernier scales as the prof insisted it was the only way to learn theory before he let us anywhere neat optical theodolites, the total station was treated like a priceless artifact :biggrin:

Modern kit is amazing from what I have seen. 

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Love this especially the Brunton compass - not sure I'd know really what to do it, or how to use it properly, but it looks a superb bit of kit. I don't have anything as fancy at work I'm afraid but I do use vernier calipers fairly regularly to accurately measure things. Being a science techie I get to play with sciencey stuff - a replacement for our ageing Van der Graaf generator being the latest toy :)  

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   several years ago I bought a K&E "mountain transit" from a major surveying outfit,  to survey "line of sight" path.   I think its a coal miners transit as it could secured to the mine roof and read right side up.  later on I bought a proper transit.  the market is still flooded with them when surveying went to GPS and anyone could use it.  vin

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2 hours ago, WRENCH said:

What ? To me that's state of the art technology. 

Still use one of these regularly. Through habit.

MachinistChartsandReference_01.jpg

and "trig" tables.

That brings memories back.mine was a 1974 edition and I had it till 2009 when some g1t pinched it at a small sub contract engineering firm.

Still got all my old mikes, and calipres and I've even got a small pot of engineers blue that's nearly 40 years old

Ps. That's a nought to one on the cover.

Edited by Turpinr

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Here's another example. Going back 20+ years, I used supply and operate these things for roof surveys etc. Weighed over 2 1/2 tons and a Land Rover was required for shifting it.

$_86.JPG

Now you do it with this, out of the boot of a car.

Camera-Drone.jpg

Edited by WRENCH

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My dear @JoT, I just have to say what a marvellous thread-head you have posted. I love the pictures of those instruments, and I reckon that putative watch designers could usefully take a look at the Brunton compass-clinometer and Frieberg compass - they are really nice. I also like your German pedometer, and I myself have a few pedometers in my collection, which bear scrunity in comparison with watch designs. :thumbsup:

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1 hour ago, WRENCH said:

Here's another example. Going back 20+ years, I used supply and operate these things for roof surveys etc. Weighed over 2 1/2 tons and a Land Rover was required for shifting it.

$_86.JPG

Now you do it with this, out of the boot of a car.

Camera-Drone.jpg

   you need something like that to lift the  masts out of those sail boats.  vin

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4 hours ago, BondandBigM said:

@Turpinr 

@WRENCH 

RkHlOv.jpg

I still use one of these every day. Not the watch by the way. 

:)

I still put two 6" rules in the ruler pocket of my overalls but rarely need. 

Outside mikes, bowyers gauges and a depth vernier these days. 

I doubt i could read (or see) an imperial vernier caliper these days

 

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On 04/09/2018 at 05:03, Turpinr said:

I still put two 6" rules in the ruler pocket of my overalls but rarely need. 

Outside mikes, bowyers gauges and a depth vernier these days. 

I doubt i could read (or see) an imperial vernier caliper these days

 

It's actually not a ruler in that pic but it does measure something. 

Any guesses ?? 

:biggrin:

b7TMua.jpg

1bXYVs.jpg

In my occasional work on the tools these days other than some of the tools, micrometers and verniers being digital nothing much has changed in forty odd years. 

In fact some of the kit we use is probably that old. 

:laugh: :laugh:

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31 minutes ago, BondandBigM said:

It's actually not a ruler in that pic but it does measure something. 

Any guesses ?? 

:biggrin:

b7TMua.jpg

1bXYVs.jpg

In my occasional work on the tools these days other than some of the tools, micrometers and verniers being digital nothing much has changed in forty odd years. 

In fact some of the kit we use is probably that old. 

:laugh: :laugh:

 

A set square? 

Is that a stubby bowyers gauge and i recognise the scale on yon boring bar

Just now, Turpinr said:

A set square? 

Is that a stubby bowyers gauge and i recognise the scale on yon boring bar

I priced up a digital 0-25 about 15 years ago and it was £200ish

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On 04/09/2018 at 00:39, BondandBigM said:

@Turpinr 

@WRENCH 

RkHlOv.jpg

I still use one of these every day. Not the watch by the way. 

:)

When I started out, first part of the training was precision toolmaking. There was the mandatory bully, I fixed his results by taking 1/2 a mm of the end of his rule. :laughing2dw: When I moved house recently, I emptied my workshop of all my old measuring gear, not much value in it. :( Kept my Britool Torque wrenches, a Starret micrometer, a vernier, and my intact Rabone rules.

Always a favourite source.

l.jpg

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I love tools and using them, Not for my job but I have a few lathes to play with as a hobby, Trouble is the only one that's set up for use is an old flat cone pulley type that has wear in the bed, It's calle a Faircut Senior and was made by Hendersons of Sheffield, They make a sauce now called Hendersons Relish or Hendo's for short!!

 

reFWPDC.jpg

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This is the old Faircut!

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1953 Myford 7

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Granville Senior (Also around 1953)..

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Little Wade

sP5DrZs.jpg

Even smaller Flexispeed 7

zdxPaQ2.jpg

Even even smaller Super Adept!!

ET5lTpL.jpg

 

I've a few more lathes but they're more like toys!!

 

 

John :)

 

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   John;  nice collection,  good show!   are those leather belts?  i have a 6 inch Logan ,  belt drive and gear change feed.  vin

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I'd love to get into machining but space is a premium as always. Besides which it would probably mean more hobbies get put on the back burner. Certainly a lathe and a mill/CNC would be very helpful for my bigger 'project'

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@Turpinr 

The small scale is for measuring flatness, we sell a lot of plate with pre machined weld preps and there is a flatness tolerance for the plate, usually around a couple of millimetres. 

So a big straight edge then use the small graduated wedge. One side is metric and one side is imperial. 

S9bHn9.jpg

qnjSh6.jpg

Inside mics and DTI's haven't changed 

jmPDTO.jpg

2GMtdv.jpg

 

 

 

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38 minutes ago, BondandBigM said:

@Turpinr 

The small scale is for measuring flatness, we sell a lot of plate with pre machined weld preps and there is a flatness tolerance for the plate, usually around a couple of millimetres. 

So a big straight edge then use the small graduated wedge. One side is metric and one side is imperial. 

S9bHn9.jpg

qnjSh6.jpg

Inside mics and DTI's haven't changed 

jmPDTO.jpg

2GMtdv.jpg

 

 

 

Clock and bases never change do they. I don't use then often these days, sadly. 

I don't know about you but i always check Inside mikes in case someone's been over tightening them and they're not set properly. 

Then there's the one's who check OD's with an outside and have them squeaking they're so tight :swoon:

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23 hours ago, vinn said:

   John;  nice collection,  good show!   are those leather belts?  i have a 6 inch Logan ,  belt drive and gear change feed.  vin

Hi Vinn

It was originally a leather belt but it broke so one of our fitters gave me the stuff that's fitted, It's some kind of vulcanised braid, It's stiffer due to being almost double the thickness of the leather one, It was a bit awkward fastening the clawed fittings on to the end that takes the pin to join the ends together!!

 

The Logan sounds nice :notworthy:

 

 

John :thumbsup:

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@johnbaz 

Back in the day around the time when I visited your Super Gun factory on a regular basis we picked up a contract to do some testing for Rolls Royce Derby. 

This involved cylindrical grinding so I bought a couple of grinders from Myford. Their works, like yours, was like stepping back into the 50's, proper old school that you just don't see these days. 

But they had moved with the times while still manufacturing their small trade mark bench top lathes. 

Lot-13---01-23.JPG

 

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