Jump to content
  • Sign Up to reply and join the friendliest Watch Forum on the web. Stick around, get to 50 posts and gain access to your full profile and additional features such as a personal messaging system, chat room and the sales forum PLUS the chance to enter our regular giveaways.
Sign in to follow this  
Deano3

Thinking about watch repair as a hobby

Recommended Posts

Hi again everyone i thought would start a new discusion, i am 29 and a hgv fitter so love tinkering and mechanics and etc i am thinking after being around here for a while i may enjoy watch repair etc and a hobby would love to strip one and see the internalls etc.

 

I am just after a bit of advice on how to go about it, should i buy some books on horology or watch repair etc or any recommendations then maybe purchase some cheap watches to strip and practice etc,

 

I know others on here would have done the same thing so point in right directuon before invest money in tools etc would be great

 

Thanks dean

 

Sent from my SM-G930F using Tapatalk

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  if you don't have good mechanical ability ; I suggest collecting watches,  send out for any repairs.  cheers,  vin

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Always handy to have a book, but plenty of videos on youtube. Main thing is too remember where things came from. I usually photo each step, or take a video. Good layout of parts, i use a tray with multiple compartments. Anyone can take a watch apart, but reassembling takes a bit of practise. After a while you get use to assembly, and may not need to photo it.

of course goes without saying, be gentle these parts are delicate. And some decent tools, can get reasonable cheap ones, before spending loads on expensive ones. Good luck, and always ask if unsure, someone will reply. 

Buy some cheap spares or repair watches, if anything goes pear shape too be polite :) 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Always handy to have a book, but plenty of videos on youtube. Main thing is too remember where things came from. I usually photo each step, or take a video. Good layout of parts, i use a tray with multiple compartments. Anyone can take a watch apart, but reassembling takes a bit of practise. After a while you get use to assembly, and may not need to photo it.
of course goes without saying, be gentle these parts are delicate. And some decent tools, can get reasonable cheap ones, before spending loads on expensive ones. Good luck, and always ask if unsure, someone will reply. 
Buy some cheap spares or repair watches, if anything goes pear shape too be polite  
Thanks for that, yes i am mechanically minded and enjoy very much stripping and putting back together. Socks and shoes then haha forst thing off is last thing on

Any books or youtube channels you recommend at all?

Were would you buy watches that dont work etc from eBay ?

Thanks dean

Sent from my SM-G930F using Tapatalk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I buy from e-bay, youtube the watch repair channel, and others can not remember names, on and off at present as grandkids monopolise, computer and tablet lol. I will try to find them, absolutely shattered at present, getting old :)

Books must admit, cant name one in particular, i did not use one, just jumped in and tried, and if stuck googled it. But had stripped and rebuilt a few clocks beforehand. As your mechanically minded, might be the same. Just wish eyesight was as good as when young. 

The movement in the picture should be a straight forward job for practise. But always remember to unwind mainsprings before dismantling. Keep parts safe Especially on watches as so small. Reassembling is the important part, with a good clean. I use an ultrasonic cleaner. Not neccesary if just practising. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I buy from e-bay, youtube the watch repair channel, and others can not remember names, on and off at present as grandkids monopolise, computer and tablet lol. I will try to find them, absolutely shattered at present, getting old
Books must admit, cant name one in particular, i did not use one, just jumped in and tried, and if stuck googled it. But had stripped and rebuilt a few clocks beforehand. As your mechanically minded, might be the same. Just wish eyesight was as good as when young. 
The movement in the picture should be a straight forward job for practise. But always remember to unwind mainsprings before dismantling. Keep parts safe Especially on watches as so small. Reassembling is the important part, with a good clean. I use an ultrasonic cleaner. Not neccesary if just practising. 
Thanks for that, what sort of watches do you practice on first and may purchase a book so if anyone has any recomendations its welcome.

Also yes i have joined the watch repair channel and been watching but need to know the basics first. Any other decent channels ?

Any other help or ideas are wecomed as think would be great hobby to tinker in

Thanks dean

Sent from my SM-G930F using Tapatalk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

WRC, rat faced git, on YouTube. Lots of good info.

Plenty of cheap watch movements are available on Esty. I have bought several, and I have managed to get one or two up and running. I am waiting for delivery of ten Vostok 2414 movements (£10, delivered). Vostok parts are cheap as chips, so it need not cost a lot to test out your repairs.

I did not bother with any books.

Be prepared to kiss a few frogs,though. :laugh:

 

 

Steve.

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi,

Do not buy cheap tools, I did and they are only good for scrap, I worked in light engineering and thought I could get away with mucking about with old quartz watches, OK with the cheap muck off eBay, big pointers etc. but when I tried to repair a Rotary it all went wrong, small thin pointers, useless tweezers that crossed sending the pointers to somewhere in the carpet  never to be seen again, then I found that my hands just were not steady enough (old age thing). Have a go but don't be too upset if it all go's wrong.

PS. I bought old watches off eBay probably the cheapest place.

Good luck.   

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Repairing watches and make them working again is a very satisfying hobby....you might be best starting on something bigger before starting on watches...go for a travel alarm clock, parts are bigger and easier to handle.....I am self taught and made many mistakes along the way....it's practise practise practise....learn by your mistakes....take plenty of pictures...buy cheap movements from ebay to practise on....nothing better than taking a back of a non working watch and getting it working again....good luck

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...