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Thimo2

DIY Movement Holder?

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I should know better but I just impulse bought an old Ricoh day date auto from India. It seems to be running okay and keeping reasonable time, however it was rattling about to an alarming extent, so I popped it open. The screw "holding" the rotor was loose/falling out. No problem, I tightened it back up, but it was still rattling. On further inspection the movement and dial were moving in the case, there didn't seem to be a movement holder. I wonder if it's possible to improvise a movement holder. It's a cheap and cheerful watch so I'm not bothered about doing it properly. If anyone has done this I'd be most grateful for any advice. I'm eyeing up a plastic milk bottle top at the moment.

Cheers!

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You can buy plastic movement rings from Cousins, either brand/size specific or as an assortment. A bit of superglue and a craft knife should do the job if you can't find a specific one.

If you are feeling ambitious find somebody with a 3D printer and get one made to your spec.

The other way is to buy one of these cheap 3D pens. If you've not used one, it's a hand held device like a pen which draws with molten plastic rather then ink. You make up the object by layering the plastic. It's freehand so usually you need to tidy the object when done. The plastic is hard so you need something like a Dremel or hot knife to smooth it down.

3D pens are handy for all manner of custom jobs.

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18 hours ago, eezy said:

You can buy plastic movement rings from Cousins, either brand/size specific or as an assortment. A bit of superglue and a craft knife should do the job if you can't find a specific one.

If you are feeling ambitious find somebody with a 3D printer and get one made to your spec.

The other way is to buy one of these cheap 3D pens. If you've not used one, it's a hand held device like a pen which draws with molten plastic rather then ink. You make up the object by layering the plastic. It's freehand so usually you need to tidy the object when done. The plastic is hard so you need something like a Dremel or hot knife to smooth it down.

3D pens are handy for all manner of custom jobs.

Many thanks! I like tghe sound of that 3D pen, I will investigate.

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The 3D pen I got is a more expensive one with attachments. It contains a hot wire for cutting foam and polystyrene (watch box inserts maybe), a soldering tip, wood burning tip and a hot knife to smooth down the objects you make.

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