Jump to content
  • Sign Up to reply and join the friendliest Watch Forum on the web. Stick around, get to 50 posts and gain access to your full profile and additional features such as a personal messaging system, chat room and the sales forum PLUS the chance to enter our regular giveaways.

Advice please re new Seamaster


Michael7778
 Share

Recommended Posts

 

Advice please re Seamaster

I am new to the automatic quality watch world, but delighted with my purchase just three days ago, of a brand new Seamaster 21230412003001, which I purchased from an AD.

I wonder if you could advise on the following:

1.  How accurate should the watch be?  so far it appears to be gaining around 12 seconds over a 24 hour period?

2. Although I take my watch off at night, it had been warn all day yesterday, it stopped at 5.45am this morning.  Why would that be when I thought the watch had a long reserve time?

3.  The manual does not mention manual winding for this particular calibre for some reason.  Any advice please and could that be my problem re accuracy and watch stopping?

4.  Does the way a watch is rested have an impact on its accuracy?

4.  Useful information to anyone testing out Goldsmith's price promise - their price promise is not honoured - I managed to acquire the watch for a whopping £250 less than Goldsmith's supposed 30% discounted price and they wouldn't budge despite me providing the detailed of the competitor (another high street supplier).  Although I have purchased from Golsmith's before I wouldn't touch them now that they fail to adhere to their promises.  They quite rudely advised me to go ahead and purchase elsewhere, without coming anywhere near the price quoted.

I look forward to receiving advise in due course.

 
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Give it a good 40 winds before you start your day, then wear as normal, lifting and turning your wrist every now and then to keep the rotor active. Then see if it lasts through the night. When fully wound it should run for at least 40 hours (not sure of the Co-axial spec).

With the +12 secs per day, are you timing it properly? It's easy to make mistakes. I use Emerald Time app for iPhone. Hack the watch at 12 and start it in synch with the app, then check back the next morning to see what the difference is.

I have a Doxa SUB with the COSC ETA and for the first three months of intermittent wear it was gaining +10 over 24 hours, which is still good, but not COSC. It's settled down now and runs consistently at +3 per 24 hours.

EDIT: If the watch is still stopping overnight after being fully wound then it needs to go back to Omega for repair/replacement. Welcome to the wacky world of watch ownership.

Edited by it'salivejim
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Some movements will accelerate or slow a bit depending on an overnight resting position, e.g. crown up, dial up, on a stand with “12 up.” I would expect a brand new Coaxial movement to be a bit more accurate than +12 secs/day, I’d give it a week to “settle in,” then if still gaining a minute or so over four days, bring back to the AD for regulating/inspection.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Same as others have said.  My Coaxial movement Seamaster with the 2500B movement can be hand wound in the first crown position and runs slightly off spec at - 5 secs per 24 hours.  This is after eight years of ownership, several activity holidays and wear in rotation with other watches in my collection.  Power reserve after a normal days activity is around 30 hours.    If yours has been in the AD for a while it may take time to settle to your wearing pattern.  An old watchmaker once advised me to wear any watch new or just serviced for two weeks on a daily basis.  This was before modern movements but still sound advice in my opinion.

Edited by ong
dodgy spelling
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sounds like you've been unlucky, your Watch is running out of spec.

First make sure it is fully wound, hand wind if you need to by unscrewing the crown you will feel it pop slightly this is the winding position.

You cannot overwind an automatic.

Then set the time: https://www.timeanddate.com/worldclock/uk/london

Then time it over a 24 hour period.

I would estimate your particular Watch should be in the region of -2 seconds to +2 seconds a day, my twenty-year-old  Seamaster SMP serviced 2 years ago can easily achieve +2 seconds a day, so no reason yours cannot.

The CoAxial movements run at 25,200 BPH or at least the Cal 2500C variants if I remember correctly, but this should have no real bearing on accuracy it is after all COSC certified.

 

Please keep us informed.:yes:

Rest assured you have a fine Watch when everything is sorted out.

 

 

Edited by PC-Magician
Link to comment
Share on other sites

In respect of the way you rest your watch I'm told you'll usually find:

1) Lay with flat and face up - makes it runs faster

2) Lay it vertically with crown down - it will run slower

3) Lay it vertically with crown up - it will run even slower 

However, the above is all comparative.

As for Autuo's winding down - likewise, as I'm usually desk working my auto's have to be manually would every so often - so now I can see the benefits of manual watches - they're thinner - and if you have to manually wind an auto - what's the point of the extra thickness?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Years ago I knew a guy who reflexively used to extend his arm and shake it every five minutes, I am guessing now he had an automatic lol.

The COSC certification can be done on the uncased movement, so it may need a little regulation once the watch is built, but the adjustment is hopefully fine between positions.

I have some very accurate watches, if you are interested in buying something to compare it with, starting at £15.00

  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Chronometer mark watches are designed ( perhaps not surprisingly ) to be used in a variety of reasonable ways with nothing in any instruction booklet saying how they should be stored at rest. The differences in performance obtained by varying resting positions are minute..... unless..... the watch is approaching a service requirement and the oils are starting to chemically separate ( for a new watch at least 7 years ).

A New watch should not present these problems so back to the shop it should go imo.... 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 minutes ago, JonnyOldBoy said:

Chronometer mark watches are designed ( perhaps not surprisingly ) to be used in a variety of reasonable ways with nothing in any instruction booklet saying how they should be stored at rest. The differences in performance obtained by varying resting positions are minute..... unless..... the watch is approaching a service requirement and the oils are starting to chemically separate ( for a new watch at least 7 years ).

A New watch should not present these problems so back to the shop it should go imo.... 

Correct.

Submit a sensible report on your new Watch.

The AD will rectify any issues.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Your watch should be covered by the Omega warranty so no problem with taking it back to the AD to be sorted.

As for the price promise, maybe you have not read the terms fully - they do state that it will not apply on discounted items and you mentioned that there was already a 30% discount. Was the other high street store an ASD and within 15 miles? No problem with you slating Goldsmiths but you really should provide full details to back up your claims.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Nothing much to add, give it a bit more time and give it a good wind .A while ago i got an auto, the first night it either gained or lost 10 seconds( i cant remember), after that it settled down and its been accurate to 2-3 secs a day ever since.I know it gets boring, but for what its worth for my particular watch, crown `down` to gain a little overnight, crown `up` lose a little.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

11 hours ago, JonnyOldBoy said:

Chronometer mark watches are designed ( perhaps not surprisingly ) to be used in a variety of reasonable ways with nothing in any instruction booklet saying how they should be stored at rest. The differences in performance obtained by varying resting positions are minute..... unless..... the watch is approaching a service requirement and the oils are starting to chemically separate ( for a new watch at least 7 years ).

A New watch should not present these problems so back to the shop it should go imo.... 

There should be a readout with the COSC certificate showing the variations in several positions. This is what the COSC test does. And the variations are not minute, unless you think -/+ 2-3 seconds over 24 hours is minute? 

Not instructions, but enough information to enable the wearer to decide how to place the watch at rest.

Edited by it'salivejim
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, it'salivejim said:

There should be a readout with the COSC certificate showing the variations in several positions. This is what the COSC test does. And the variations are not minute, unless you think -/+ 2-3 seconds over 24 hours is minute? 

Not instructions, but enough information to enable the wearer to decide how to place the watch at rest.

Laying it in different positions does not lead the watch to operate outside of spec. And the parameters you quoted are maxima/minima ( as they would legally have to be ). In reality the IQR of all eventualities would lead to variances of 1 second or less. Which to me is "minute".

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...