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Disclaimer: I am new to the world of owning mechanicals/ autos, so if come across as a horological simpleton here, it's because I am.

 

My new Raymond Weil is increasingly 'slipping' when I wind it via the crown. It's like when you're pedalling a bike and the chain slips.

 

I'm getting a click instead of a firm wind that has resistance on what appears to be a random basis. Not every time by any means, but increasingly.

 

Have I buggered something up by overwinding it, or is there a non-buggered explanation?

 

The collective wisdom and experience of the forum will be gratefully received.

 

Sent from my SM-T230NU using Tapatalk

 

 

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As it is a reasonably new watch, we can ignore the wear factor. I would want to see which wheels are slipping. Could be the Clutch wheel and Pinion or the Winding Pinion and Crown Wheel. Could even be

my Oris Big crown pointer has a built in clutch mechanism that "slips" when the spring gets to a certain tension.they are like this from new i presume to stop heavy handed folk breaking the mainspring

I have had this before, it probably isn't the clutch kicking in when nearing a full wind it is the stem not fully engaging the keyless works when in the winding position, it is more common with screw

If it's an auto they have a slipper clutch to prevent overwinding (the rotor spins willy nilly, so it needs it not to self destruct).

I'm far from an expert on watches, but if it sounds like teeth slipping then I'd stop winding it to prevent any (additional?) damage and get it looked at by a professional.

I realise that's a super generic answer, but if you think about how the mechanisms work - and how small some of the parts are - then it definitely makes sense to use the manufacturer warranty.

Worst case scenario, they send it back and your back where you started.

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Sounds to me like the feeling when that clutch kicks in when it is fully wound. If you are wearing it daily it shouldn't really need hand winding, the "random" nature of when it happens would just be how close to fully wound it is when you started. Basically when you feel it do that, it doesn't need winding any more, and if it does it more or less straight away you didn't need to be winding it in the first place.

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I recommend shaking rather than hand winding.

I've hand wound for years without issue but most off-the-shelf movements have a probability for failure over time with hand winding. So why not just shake. Takes the same amount of time and same the watch from unnecessary and premature servicing later...

 

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3 hours ago, JayDeep said:

 

 

Just hit it with a hammer at the same time. This guys never heard of mechanical sympathy ? Everyone knows the correct way is a shoogle. :laughing2dw:

@Eski Ten turns of the crown to start your watch is usually all that is required. If you're wearing it all day, your wrist/arm movement is all that is required to keep it going.

Edited by WRENCH
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Thanks guys. Hopefully it is the clutch thing.

I wore it all day for the first time yesterday, and admittedly did try winding it a few turns before bedtime, which probably wasn't required.

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my Oris Big crown pointer has a built in clutch mechanism that "slips" when the spring gets to a certain tension.they are like this from new i presume to stop heavy handed folk breaking the mainspring and/or the winding mechanism using that damn great crown......94JQxGU.jpg

Edited by greasemonk
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it probably is just the clutch engaging and disengaging with autos i usually just give them 10 slow winds from stopped and then let the rotor do its job. With manuals pretty much the same but another 10 when i take them off. As @WRENCH points out its probably a bad idea to belt them with the side of you hand like hong kong phooey 

 

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11 hours ago, Eski said:

 

Disclaimer: I am new to the world of owning mechanicals/ autos, so if come across as a horological simpleton here, it's because I am.

 

My new Raymond Weil is increasingly 'slipping' when I wind it via the crown. It's like when you're pedalling a bike and the chain slips.

 

I'm getting a click instead of a firm wind that has resistance on what appears to be a random basis. Not every time by any means, but increasingly.

 

Have I buggered something up by overwinding it, or is there a non-buggered explanation?

 

The collective wisdom and experience of the forum will be gratefully received.

 

I have had this before, it probably isn't the clutch kicking in when nearing a full wind it is the stem not fully engaging the keyless works when in the winding position, it is more common with screw down crowns I have found. When winding if you try and extert a little outward pressure with thumb and forefinger  (i.e. away from the case) on the crown it often helps.

Hopefully a watch repairer might be able to give a better explanation! @simon2

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3 minutes ago, Nigelp said:

probably a bad idea to belt them with the side of you hand like hong kong phooey 

There is absolutely no need. Vostoks are the most sensitive to start. I have all my Vostok autos in the same box, and when I remove it from the depths of my vault, the 15 paces of walking with the box has them all running. Obviously walking style can enhance the auto wind action.

 

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The collective knowledge here is second to none :notworthy:

Your various inputs gives me lots of help as to how to proceed. Slower winding is a good idea. Less turns is also a good idea.

I hope it's a clutch mechanism designed to protect the watch from newbie mechanical owners like myself. However, the JoT suggestion is also possible so I'll bare that it mind also. And if all else fails the Raymond Weil official service team are based just down the road from me and are very friendly, so I can always ping it in to them if the problem persists or gets worse.

Hong Kong Phooey - Nigel you are a legend for posting that :thumbs_up:  I've spent a large part of my life doing karate, and my wife refers to me as Hong Kong Phooey - more for my naivety than my karate skills I think. She's the cat, apparently.

And regardless of my watch, to initiate a thread that attracts HKP and Monty Python is a thread worthy of creation. They don't make comedy that good any more imho

Edited by Eski
Silly Walks
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17 minutes ago, WRENCH said:

There is absolutely no need. Vostoks are the most sensitive to start. I have all my Vostok autos in the same box, and when I remove it from the depths of my vault, the 15 paces of walking with the box has them all running. Obviously walking style can enhance the auto wind action.

 

Is he the new Tory PM?

12 minutes ago, Eski said:

The collective knowledge here is second to none :notworthy:

Your various inputs gives me lots of help as to how to proceed. Slower winding is a good idea. Less turns is also a good idea.

I hope it's a clutch mechanism designed to protect the watch from newbie mechanical owners like myself. However, the JoT suggestion is also possible so I'll bare that it mind also. And if all else fails the Raymond Weil official service team are based just down the road from me and are very friendly, so I can always ping it in to them if the problem persists or gets worse.

Hong Kong Phooey - Nigel you are a legend for posting that :thumbs_up:  I've spent a large part of my life doing karate, and my wife refers to me as Hong Kong Phooey - more for my naivety than my karate skills I think. She's the cat, apparently.

And regardless of my watch, to initiate a thread that attracts HKP and Monty Python is a thread worthy of creation. They don't make comedy that good any more imho

Have you any idea who is going to be our next PM? The one we've had is a proper wind up. 

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As it is a reasonably new watch, we can ignore the wear factor. I would want to see which wheels are slipping. Could be the Clutch wheel and Pinion or the Winding Pinion and Crown Wheel. Could even be as simple as parts need lubricating. The watch maybe a recent new purchase, but it could be a few years since manufacture.

hope this helps.

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3 hours ago, simon2 said:

As it is a reasonably new watch, we can ignore the wear factor. I would want to see which wheels are slipping. Could be the Clutch wheel and Pinion or the Winding Pinion and Crown Wheel. Could even be as simple as parts need lubricating. The watch maybe a recent new purchase, but it could be a few years since manufacture.

hope this helps.

This is a very good point. The watch is new in terms of invoice, warranty, first ownership etc., but is certainly not of the current RW line up. I suspect a coupler of years old as a model.

Appreciate the input :)

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On 17/05/2019 at 16:24, Eski said:

This is a very good point. The watch is new in terms of invoice, warranty, first ownership etc., but is certainly not of the current RW line up. I suspect a coupler of years old as a model.

Appreciate the input :)

With NOS its all about how they have been stored.... that's why "bargain" luxury watches from the States are not always a sure fire great idea.....

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With NOS its all about how they have been stored.... that's why "bargain" luxury watches from the States are not always a sure fire great idea.....
Good point

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So having eliminated the possibility that somehow this was an overwind 'clutch' issue (I let the watch run to a stop yet it still slipped like crazy), I took it to Raymond Weil's UK service centre today, which happily is only 35 miles down the road. The watchmaker who looked at it took all of about 5 seconds to confirm that the problem was with two cogs within the setting system (or keyless work?) that were not engaging with each other properly from the outset, and then when wound were gradually (or quite quickly in this case) rounding off each other's cog tips and therefore making the problem progressively worse, which is what I'd experienced.

The solution is replacement of said two cogs, which thankfully is being sorted under warranty due to my having purchased from a RW approved US retailer.

Mechanicals are such fun :clap:

My quartz watches are so boring in comparison, what with their consistent accuracy and lack of any maintenance requirements :biggrin:

Seriously, I kind of wanted this mechanical experience (although maybe not a repair after two weeks of owning a new watch, lol). It's all good. Still loving the watch and will very much look forward to getting it back in circa two weeks time.

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I'm glad you got it sorted - I was going to say I only had this problem once - and that was with a brand new watch - a Doxa Sub1500T.  I has ti send it back twice to them to get them to fix it.

I do tend to end up hand-winding my Auto's every couple of days - or everyday when the one I'll be wearing that month isn't actually being worn - e.g. for the weekend. However, perhaps the 'Shaking' method is worth a go -  but I certainly will be trying it with a lot more sympathy than Jay Deep's video :)

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On 24/05/2019 at 18:31, Eski said:

So having eliminated the possibility that somehow this was an overwind 'clutch' issue (I let the watch run to a stop yet it still slipped like crazy), I took it to Raymond Weil's UK service centre today, which happily is only 35 miles down the road. The watchmaker who looked at it took all of about 5 seconds to confirm that the problem was with two cogs within the setting system (or keyless work?) that were not engaging with each other properly from the outset, and then when wound were gradually (or quite quickly in this case) rounding off each other's cog tips and therefore making the problem progressively worse, which is what I'd experienced.

The solution is replacement of said two cogs, which thankfully is being sorted under warranty due to my having purchased from a RW approved US retailer.

Mechanicals are such fun :clap:

My quartz watches are so boring in comparison, what with their consistent accuracy and lack of any maintenance requirements :biggrin:

Seriously, I kind of wanted this mechanical experience (although maybe not a repair after two weeks of owning a new watch, lol). It's all good. Still loving the watch and will very much look forward to getting it back in circa two weeks time.

Good result and well done to the RW technician :thumbs-up:

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  • 3 weeks later...

Hello chaps
I hope all is well with the good people of the forum :)
I got my RW back on Tuesday, with new setting cogs and winding without any problem. Hoorah!
Yesterday evening I noticed the watch was practically 'jangling' when it moved. Weird.
So, back to the RW service centre today. Tech dude looked at it for circa three seconds and declared 'noisy oscillator. So sorry sir. We'll sort it.'
So, another couple of weeks without my new watch and reintroduction to the mechanical world. Haha.

Still, I must say that despite all the aggravation, I'm somehow smitten with my mechanical. Aside from the faults this one is running well in terms of accuracy, and looks fantastic.
As a lady on a travel advert says, 'still winning!'

Sent from my SM-G930F using Tapatalk

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On 20/06/2019 at 20:26, Eski said:

Hello chaps
I hope all is well with the good people of the forum :)
I got my RW back on Tuesday, with new setting cogs and winding without any problem. Hoorah!
Yesterday evening I noticed the watch was practically 'jangling' when it moved. Weird.
So, back to the RW service centre today. Tech dude looked at it for circa three seconds and declared 'noisy oscillator. So sorry sir. We'll sort it.'
So, another couple of weeks without my new watch and reintroduction to the mechanical world. Haha.

Still, I must say that despite all the aggravation, I'm somehow smitten with my mechanical. Aside from the faults this one is running well in terms of accuracy, and looks fantastic.
As a lady on a travel advert says, 'still winning!'

Sent from my SM-G930F using Tapatalk
 

Blimey - you're not having much luck with that one are you :(

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