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ziggy1024

Extracting a broken bracelet screw...

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WSCXCeu.jpg

Bother. I don't have drills that small! Guessing that's the best approach? Anyone care to recommend a source for teeny tiny bits?

 

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Cousins do small drill bits...and you may need to re-tap the thread if you do manage to drill out the broken bit.

https://www.cousinsuk.com/category/hss-drill-bits

However, some drill chucks won't grip a really tiny drill, so you may be better off with something like this...and using a Dremel type machine.

https://www.cousinsuk.com/category/jewellery-drill-bits

 

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7 hours ago, ziggy1024 said:

WSCXCeu.jpg

Bother. I don't have drills that small! Guessing that's the best approach? Anyone care to recommend a source for teeny tiny bits?

 

i dont understand how that works, it looks to have pushed the collar out at the bottom (or top) is that the side with the screw head thats sheered? The thread at the bottom looks like the end of the the screw? If it is id soak in in 3 in 1 and then use a pair of pliers to twist it doing short back and forth movements until it went. 

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30 minutes ago, Nigelp said:

i dont understand how that works, it looks to have pushed the collar out at the bottom (or top) is that the side with the screw head thats sheered? The thread at the bottom looks like the end of the the screw? If it is id soak in in 3 in 1 and then use a pair of pliers to twist it doing short back and forth movements until it went. 

The end of the thread is inside the bit at the bottom of the pic as posted... Nowt to grab. And it was soaking in plus gas before I went near trying to remove it.

If it was a grownup sized bolt I'd have grabbed an ez-out, but this tiny stuff isnt quite the same. Can't quite weld a nut to it either!

51 minutes ago, Roger the Dodger said:

Cousins do small drill bits...and you may need to re-tap the thread if you do manage to drill out the broken bit.

https://www.cousinsuk.com/category/hss-drill-bits

However, some drill chucks won't grip a really tiny drill, so you may be better off with something like this...and using a Dremel type machine.

https://www.cousinsuk.com/category/jewellery-drill-bits

 

Ta! Think I'm going to try something hand-powered first, but I might even have some drill bits for my Dremel somewhere.

8 minutes ago, Richie_ said:

You can buy small pin vices for just a few pounds off eBay and Amazon 

Yeah, just wasn't sure whether they'd be worth the effort or if I'd wish I'd bought a proper one rather than one made of cheese.. 

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6 minutes ago, ziggy1024 said:

Can't quite weld a nut to it either!

can't you just put a leather strap on it?

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If the bracelet is stainless and the broken screw part is steel, you could try Allum powder , it will dissolve the steel and leave the stainless. I have used this with success on stainless crowns where the stem had broken off flush 

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3 hours ago, andyclient said:

If the bracelet is stainless and the broken screw part is steel, you could try Allum powder , it will dissolve the steel and leave the stainless. I have used this with success on stainless crowns where the stem had broken off flush 

Ooh cunning. I do have a spare link that I can test it on, before risking damaging the (end) link that I need to use!

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Bah. Zenith and their 'stainless' screws; apparently impervious to alum. Back to the drill. Going to have to put some power behind it though, the hand option will take forever.

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I am afraid that even with power tool, it will take forever too…

And this is because of the drill bits. HSS is a good steel, but it was  20-30 years ago, when they used to put tungsten inside… Now, if You read ‘HSS’ on a modern tool, it means “GOOD FOR NOTHING”. And You want to drill in stainless steel...

You need a tungsten carbide drill bit, but, have in mind that they are very crunchy and easy to break…

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30 minutes ago, nevenbekriev said:

I am afraid that even with power tool, it will take forever too…

 

And this is because of the drill bits. HSS is a good steel, but it was  20-30 years ago, when they used to put tungsten inside… Now, if You read ‘HSS’ on a modern tool, it means “GOOD FOR NOTHING”. And You want to drill in stainless steel...

 

You need a tungsten carbide drill bit, but, have in mind that they are very crunchy and easy to break…

 

Yeah, my old Dormer set sadly doesn't go small enough!

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On ‎15‎/‎06‎/‎2019 at 10:28, Nigelp said:

i dont understand how that works, it looks to have pushed the collar out at the bottom (or top) is that the side with the screw head thats sheered? The thread at the bottom looks like the end of the the screw? If it is id soak in in 3 in 1 and then use a pair of pliers to twist it doing short back and forth movements until it went. 

   penitrating oil.     vin

On ‎15‎/‎06‎/‎2019 at 13:16, ziggy1024 said:

How unsatisfying would that be?!

    waste of time, you could be drinking.   vin

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17 hours ago, Roger the Dodger said:

Would these diamond drills from Cousins be any good? They also do diamond burrs.

https://www.cousinsuk.com/product/diamond-drill-bits-af-swiss

They do TC drill bits too.

https://www.cousinsuk.com/category/tungsten-carbide-drill-bits

No, this kind of diamond drills won't do.

Yes, the carbide drills a good, but very expensive...

Look here: https://www.ebay.co.uk/sch/i.html?_from=R40&_sacat=0&_nkw=tungsten carbide pcb drills&rt=nc&LH_PrefLoc=1&_trksid=p2045573.m1684

They are china made - drill fine, but easy to brake. There are japan made too - more expensive, and harder to brake…

Also, the skill of drilling comes together with the skill of sharpening drill bits…

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On ‎10‎/‎07‎/‎2019 at 22:09, nevenbekriev said:

No, this kind of diamond drills won't do.

Yes, the carbide drills a good, but very expensive...

Look here: https://www.ebay.co.uk/sch/i.html?_from=R40&_sacat=0&_nkw=tungsten carbide pcb drills&rt=nc&LH_PrefLoc=1&_trksid=p2045573.m1684

They are china made - drill fine, but easy to brake. There are japan made too - more expensive, and harder to brake…

 

Also, the skill of drilling comes together with the skill of sharpening drill bits…

 

     as i recall,  carbide drills are sharpend with a "green stone".   in other words, not easly ground.  buy japan.  vin

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