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What Other Interests or Collections Do You Have?


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Not long ago I mentioned that I was going to start making a selection of Marvel character themed paracord bracelets. The first two are now completed and more will follow...I have bracelet plans for Captain America, Ironman, Vision, Deadpool, etc. I know Andy (@Iceblue) makes bracelets too and has a fundraiser going by selling his and donating towards the forum upkeep. If there is any interest in these Marvel ones, let me know and I will do something similar.

Spiderman...

Paracord Bracelets. Spiderman.

Paracord Bracelets. Spiderman.

Paracord Bracelets. Spiderman.

The Hulk.

Paracord Bracelets. The Hulk.

Paracord Bracelets. The Hulk.

Paracord Bracelets. The Hulk.

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Have had a bit of time to make a couple more Marvel 'Avengers' themed bracelets...the first is a 'Groot' based one, and like the character, is a true survivalist bracelet as the buckle has a built in compass, whistle, sparking rod, digital watch and knife. My son asked for this one. It is basically formed from Solomon knots with accent colours woven in to resemble the vines and branches of Groot.

Paracord bracelets. Groot.

Paracord bracelets. Groot.

Paracord bracelets. Groot.

Paracord bracelets. Groot.

Paracord bracelets. Groot.

The second is a tribute to the Infinity gauntlet worn by Thanos in the 'Infinity Wars'. It's a 'Trilobite' weave, with coloured 'Ranger beads' to represent the 6 Infinity stones.

Paracord bracelets. Infinity wars.

Paracord bracelets. Infinity wars.

Paracord bracelets. Infinity wars.

A few more key fobs...

Key fobs.

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On 27/08/2019 at 20:17, johnbaz said:

It was Bond, I used to pass it every day on my way to work until the planners stopped us driving through the Whicker!!

My father was a driver for Tommy Wards scrap division, Wages were rubbish but the fiddle made up for it!! :thumbsup:

 

John :)

Hecky la pecky that brings back memories.

They had Ward 7's and DSG's in the training centre at Leyland Motors in the mid 70's, still painted in their wartime dark blue colour.

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I've always had a bit of a thing for knives/multi-tools & the like & have recently bought these two knives. I'm quite interested in paracord rope work/knots & thought these may come in handy due to the marlin spike which is used for splicing rope & loosening knots. To be honest I'm kidding myself really but neither were expensive & both are quite cool things especially the vintage one :)  It's not a great photo of them I'm afraid but the silver one is a modern Marbles yachting/rigging knife whilst the black one is a vintage British/Belgian army clasp/jack/pen knife. This came in mucky condition (lots of old storage grease & a small amount of rust) but is otherwise in good condition & dates from 1951 - when I get chance I'm intending to clean it some more but considering it's nearly 70 years old I don't think it's doing too badly. I'd buy another one but the website I found it on now won't post these due to new legislation :( Not sure how the likes of Heinnie Haynes (where I got the Marbles knife from & who sell all sorts of bladed items) get round this! Anyway if it's lasted this long it'll probably last a fair bit longer & I probably don't actually "need" a second one! 

The can opener is marked: A.B.L.1951 which if entered into Google gives the following info (from BladeForums.com): ABL= Armée belge-Belgisch leger which just means Belgian army, written in French first and Dutch second. 1950 (or 1951 in my case) was the year they were issued. Sometimes you see these on the web as British army knives, but they aren't.  :thumbs_up:

c3lpHWN.jpg   

PSiRerc.jpg

 

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30 minutes ago, pauluspaolo said:

I've always had a bit of a thing for knives/multi-tools & the like & have recently bought these two knives. I'm quite interested in paracord rope work/knots & thought these may come in handy due to the marlin spike which is used for splicing rope & loosening knots. To be honest I'm kidding myself really but neither were expensive & both are quite cool things especially the vintage one :)  It's not a great photo of them I'm afraid but the silver one is a modern Marbles yachting/rigging knife whilst the black one is a vintage British/Belgian army clasp/jack/pen knife. This came in mucky condition (lots of old storage grease & a small amount of rust) but is otherwise in good condition & dates from 1951 - when I get chance I'm intending to clean it some more but considering it's nearly 70 years old I don't think it's doing too badly. I'd buy another one but the website I found it on now won't post these due to new legislation :( Not sure how the likes of Heinnie Haynes (where I got the Marbles knife from & who sell all sorts of bladed items) get round this! Anyway if it's lasted this long it'll probably last a fair bit longer & I probably don't actually "need" a second one! 

The can opener is marked: A.B.L.1951 which if entered into Google gives the following info (from BladeForums.com): ABL= Armée belge-Belgisch leger which just means Belgian army, written in French first and Dutch second. 1950 (or 1951 in my case) was the year they were issued. Sometimes you see these on the web as British army knives, but they aren't.  :thumbs_up:

c3lpHWN.jpg   

PSiRerc.jpg

 

I've just been looking back through this thread & see that I posted on page 6 (in 2009 I think). In that post I mentioned that I was restoring/modifying a 1985 Reliant Scimitar SS1. This has now been on the road for some time & is fitted with an 1800 Zetec (not the 2 litre as I mentioned in my post), it's been reliable & fun to drive though I don't use it very often - though I did drive it to work yesterday. Any excuse to post some pictures  :clap:

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Edited by pauluspaolo
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1 hour ago, pauluspaolo said:

come in handy due to the marlin spike which is used for splicing rope & loosening knots

The thing to look out for with a Marlin Spike (if actually using it for its intended purpose, rather than just cleaning under your nails etc.) is that it should lock in position with the lanyard ring.

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26 minutes ago, Boots said:

The thing to look out for with a Marlin Spike (if actually using it for its intended purpose, rather than just cleaning under your nails etc.) is that it should lock in position with the lanyard ring.

Yes I've seen that on a couple of similar knives that I've semi-seriously looked at. Considering the UK laws about locking blades (if you can call the spike a blade?) I'm reluctant to get a knife with anything that locks. Neither of the above knives have this feature & I don't consider it a massive problem. I can't see me splicing any rope in the near (or far) future & if I have the knife on me I'm much more likely to end up using it as an awl or punch. All the blades/tools on the vintage one take some effort to open, feel solid when open & take an equal amount of effort in closing. I really can't see any of the blades closing accidentally unless the user does something stupid with it. The whole thing has a rather rough made from girders feel to it. A refined & well finished knife it most certainly isn't! The Marbles is quite a nicely finished knife (certainly when compared to the vintage one) & has blades/tools that are easier to open/close, in fact it's one of the easiest to open/close folding knives I've ever owned or used. However once again I'd say that unless the user does something stupid with it I can't see the blades closing accidentally & causing injury. Of the two I much prefer the feel - in respect of robustness, heft, age, history etc - of the vintage one.

I'll try to get a photo of them both without the watch getting in the way :)      

Edited by pauluspaolo
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I took some more photos of the pen knives I mentioned a couple of posts above. I found the yellow one at home - I think it belongs to my youngest step daughter as she likes sailing & has sailed/crewed on yachts in the past. On this knife (marked Mac Italy) the spike & shackle key lock but the serrated blade doesn't - none of the blades/tools lock on the other two.

All the knives are a similar size when closed but the blades on the 2 modern knives are a fair bit bigger at 3" (close to the UK legal max) than the vintage one which is closer to 2 3/4" in length.

I'm going to have a go at cleaning up the blade on the vintage knife today/this week.

:)  

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Edited by pauluspaolo
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Made a few more key fobs today...basically they are all what are called 'Globe' knots but they are different types. I went a bit patriotic on the first two! 

The first is a proper 'Monkey fist'. This is a simple 'wrap in 3 directions' knot. It was/still is used as a weight on the end of a heaving line...a light line thrown from a ship to the dock. The heavier docking line is then attached and pulled across. It usually has a weight inside it to facilitate throwing. This small one has a marble inside. The 3 knots just above the fist are 'snake' knots and the knot below the keyring is a Turk's head.

Key Fobs.

The second is based on a Turk's head knot, which is woven like a plait. It too is formed round a marble (or any other round object like a wooden bead or a steel ball bearing). It's more complicated to tie than the Monkey fist.

Key Fobs.

This last one is the most complicated. It's a 'pineapple' knot, and is a larger Turk's head with another colour woven in separately. This is a replica of a life preserver. The marble in this is the size of a golf ball (in fact they are sometimes made with a golf ball) and is very heavy.

Key Fobs.

Key Fobs.

Key Fobs.

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I had a go at cleaning the main blade of the military knife last night/this morning. I used used the finest wet & dry paper I had along with some brasso metal polish. Not a bad result - certainly looks better than it did - but the pitting's quite deep so it'd take forever to remove it all. After getting it to this state I was cold (was in the garage) so gave it up & went in for a cuppa & to warm up. This morning I used the same grade wet & dry paper with some oil in the hope that this will get into the pitting & keep the rust at bay. The oil (diesel oil I think) was in a dropping bottle at work & we'll have to see if it has the desired effect. 

Next job is to sharpen it - it's reasonably sharp already & will cut quite thick string & paracord with a bit of effort. The edge is straight & undamaged so that's good & should make the job a bit simpler. I have a sharpening stone that came with a set of chisels so I'll probably try to use that. I've no real idea what I'm doing though so I'll be perusing YouTube for inspiration/advice :)  

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Just completed the latest in my series of 'Avenger' bracelets. This one is based on the penultimate Phase 3 film 'Avengers: Endgame' and the colours reflect the 'Quantum' suits the team wore in the film. It's quite large, requiring a 3/4" buckle and is 1.5" (40mm) wide and 1/2" (13mm) thick. It's a version of the Kahuku sanctified weave.

Paracord bracelets: Endgame.

Paracord bracelets: Endgame.

Paracord bracelets: Endgame.

Image result for avengers quantum realm suit

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In view of what day it is today (Rememberance Sunday) I thought I'd have a go at making some bracelets with a flag theme to them and came up with 3 different red,white and blue items. There is a small one (3/4" wide), a medium one (1" wide) and a large one (1 1/4"wide.

The first two are based on the very simple Solomon's knot (also called a square knot or a Portuguese sennit) while the large one is a version of the sanctified weave, (named after the company 'Sanctified Knots', whose owner invented it)....and of course , there also had to be the most famous symbol ever...the Poppy.

Paracord poppy.

Small. Solomon knot with a spine (the white part)

Paracord bracelets: Red, white and blue.

Paracord bracelets: Red, white and blue.

Medium. Double Solomon knot.

Paracord bracelets: Red, white and blue.

Paracord bracelets: Red, white and blue.

Large. Sanctified weave.

Paracord bracelets: Red, white and blue.

Paracord bracelets: Red, white and blue.

Paracord bracelets: Red, white and blue.

The Solomon knot is easy to tie and needs no explanation, but the Sanctified weave is worth having a look at.

I use a jig, as it's much easier to keep all 6 cords in order. Once the four strand core is in place, the weave can start, First, the two reds go behind the core and come up through the middle...

Paracord bracelets: Red, white and blue.

Then the first white comes from behind, through the middle below the reds and then through the red loop on the right.

Paracord bracelets: Red, white and blue.

Repeat on the other side taking the white through the red loop on the left

Paracord bracelets: Red, white and blue.

Then the first blue comes under everything, up through the middle, over everything and back down through the middle, passing to the right of itself.

Paracord bracelets: Red, white and blue.

Repeat on the other side, finally passing to the left of itself.

Paracord bracelets: Red, white and blue.

Tighten it all up and repeat until finished. Snip and singe the ends as usual.

Paracord bracelets: Red, white and blue.

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Grim weather again today, so ever on the lookout for new knots to try, I found a tutorial about the 'Rattlesnake' knot (which resembles a snake's rattle) and decided to have a go. When tied, it's triangular in section. Several hours later, and I had a few new key fobs, which is what this knot is ideal for.

Key fobs: Rattlesnake knot.

Key fobs: Rattlesnake knot.

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I mentioned a few posts back, a bowl of lathe turned wooden fruit that I made for my late M-I-L. At that time I also commented that I used to make wooden eggs from scraps as samples, but that none had survived. Just before we came away, I found buried at the back of a seldom looked in cupboard, the last bowl of eggs I made....probably hidden by the other half...:laughing2dw:

The bowl is again made from Fiddleback Sycamore, but this one was made in two pieces, which were then joined. There's less waste this way, as the bowl can be turned from a relatively narrow blank, and the stem and foot from an even smaller one.

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The two bowls together...

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The eggs...L-R

Kingwood, Pink Ivory, Lime, Lignum vitae.

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L-R

Walnut, Zebrano, African Blackwood, Yew.

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L-R

Tulip wood, Pitch Pine, Purple Heart, Bird's Eye Maple.

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Pink Ivory is a very rare wood, and very expensive. It has been protected for over 40 years and cannot be felled anymore. Therefore, if you can get hold of a piece, you know it's at least 40 years old or more. When initially turned, it is a beautiful pale pink in colour, but unless kept in the dark, quickly oxidises to a pale straw colour as above. I had one small billet of this rare wood, not enough to make anything significant,  but I got a couple of eggs, pens and several lace bobbins out of it.

Freshly cut Pink Ivory.

Pink_Ivory.jpg

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3 hours ago, Roger the Dodger said:

R

Kingwood, Pink Ivory, Lime, Lignum vitae.

LignumVitae... one of several  woods with a density greater than water, so does not float! 

free piece of useless information for you. :laughing2dw:

Edited by Teg62x
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