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Kilrymont

SKX011J1 goes bonkers

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My SKX011J1 is a few months old. I'd got its regulation pretty well nailed to keeping almost true time (while worn) but after several week or more of daily use (I'd found myself preferring it to others) for no reason I can identify it started running a little too fast. Then crazy fast, so fast that maybe minutes per day were being gained. I tried running it right down, tried tapping it in various orientations lest the hairspring had somehow hooked up somehow causing this crazy acceleration.

Eventually I put it back on the timegrapher - and could find no setting that restored any kind of sanity.  It was put aside as a bad job gone wrong with a faulty escapement and I wore other watches.  I have others with the 7S26/7S36 movements and they behave themselves in a predictable way, allowing a bit of back"hacking" when in need of winding but behaving as these do when worn sensibly. Including another couple I'd also managed to get running sub-6secs gain daily. Not quite as near-perfect as the 011 but not far away.

Periodically I'd wind the 011 to see if anything had shifted back to normality but that never happened and I began to consider giving it an eBay transplant to an nh36, but did nothing about it.

Then on the 16th Jan 2020 I tried again, Wow. It kept time! Slightly slow, but back to usable.So I wore it, with a second watch on my other wrist as a sanity check. Until going to bed last night, it showed an almost-acceptable pattern of losing about 8secs/day. Not as I'd set it months earlier, but on the slow side of acceptable.

And this morning of the 19th, worn overnight, it's gained *5 minutes* over 8 hours. Back to its crazy house state again after running ok worn for over two days clear.

I'm puzzled by this unaccountable schizophrenia in this previously admirable watch....   I'm retired, and am barely active enough to keep an auto watch like these running so I pretend I have St Vitus Dance for a minute or two periodically to apply some actual movement to - the movement!  Other than that I rotate watches like many do, and none have suffered impacts or been dropped. I'm careful.

Comments welcome. Helpful ones even moreso! 

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@Kilrymont   The balance spring could be magnetised, it makes the coils of the hairspring stick together which shortens its swing, increases its frequency and makes it gain time. It takes seconds to degauss see if you can find a local watch repairer or failing that you can buy one on Ebay for about £10.

 If that doesn't work could be oil or something on the balance spring which has the same effect as being magnetised. If this is the case then it would need a trip to a watch repairer.

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47 minutes ago, JoT said:

@Kilrymont   The balance spring could be magnetised, it makes the coils of the hairspring stick together which shortens its swing, increases its frequency and makes it gain time. It takes seconds to degauss see if you can find a local watch repairer or failing that you can buy one on Ebay for about £10.

 If that doesn't work could be oil or something on the balance spring which has the same effect as being magnetised. If this is the case then it would need a trip to a watch repairer.

I agree with JoT...something is causing the coils in the balance spring to adhere to each other, thus increasing the amplitude. You seem to be pretty well equipped if you have a timegrapher, so I guess you know your way around a movement. Whip the back off and see if there's a stray blob of lube sticking a couple of coils of hairspring together, or as JoT said, check it's not magnetised. Failing this, give @simon2, our resident watchmeister a shout.

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 Thanks for the replies chaps. I discounted magnetisation of the hairspring as its transition from acceptable behaviour to terrible as described happened overnight on my wrist, and (as far as I know) apart from my magnetic personality there's no source of stray gaussing in my bed. Apologies for recycling what must be a very second hand joke on this forum...

I did a routine inspection of the affected area when It first went bonkers, through the only loupe I have at present. All looked normal.  This return to sane timekeeping that immediately preceded this burst of unwelcome speed, I can't account for at all. Despite having used the timegrapher reasonably successfully with several pieces, my expertise is very lacking. As is my experience.

I'd no idea there was a resident watchmaker on the premises, so to speak.  Before bothering him, I'll try some swearing and tapping its backside in case I can frighten it into behaving better..

As a side query, do any of you have any experience of the bloke doing ebay NH35 transplants? Come to that, does Simon do such stuff? I've watched a number of you tube clips showing that sort of thing but a combination of imperfect sight and inexperience tend to discourage that level of DIY.

Again, thanks for the timely replies.

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