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ziggy1024

Silly question time - what oil?

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I fancy pulling something apart and putting it back together again - nothing valuable, don't necessarily expect it to ever work again, but I'd like to give it a fighting chance! So what would you recommend as a starting point for oil(s) for say a Seiko 5 (for want of any better example)? I know a generic answer isn't going to be 'correct' for anything, and aplogies if it's too painful for those with mechanical sympathy to even consider, but is there such thing as the '3-in-1' of the watch world?!

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There are a number of different oils and greases used in watches.  There is no such thing as an all in one solution, but a very rough rule of thumb is that components that move slowly need thicker oil, and faster moving parts like pallets need very thin oil.

And they are all expensive

You might want to get some Mobius 8000 for the pallets, D5 for pivots and 8300 for springs and leaves.  You can see a full chart here

https://www.cousinsuk.com/document/category/moebius-lubricating-chart

 

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I myself have sometimes found what I thought was a good idea or question falls on deaf ears when I post it on the Forum.:laugh:

Don't be embarrassed Ziggy, and good luck with taking apart a watch and putting it back together. You are braver than I.:)

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I have the same query. I just bought an old pocket watch movement to learn on. Some previous owner has clearly attempted to service the movement and used what appears to be truck engine sump oil. 

I was wondering if modern silicone lubricants are used today in watch making and servicing. 

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