Jump to content
  • Sign Up to reply and join the friendliest Watch Forum on the web. Stick around, get to 50 posts and gain access to your full profile and additional features such as a personal messaging system, chat room and the sales forum PLUS the chance to enter our regular giveaways.
Sign in to follow this  
Chantry1

Hamilton electric watches

Recommended Posts

The Hamilton electric was the pioneer battery powered watch, the electronic was much later and I believe that some used off the shelf movements.  The Electric is the more desirable watch

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, scottswatches said:

The Hamilton electric was the pioneer battery powered watch, the electronic was much later and I believe that some used off the shelf movements.  The Electric is the more desirable watch

But the movement is even less reliable than the early Timex electrics......The cal.500 movement was to say the least electrically 'basic' and 'fragile', the later 505 cal. less so, though not much........Some information on their care HERE...

All of that said doesn't stop me lusting after a 1950's Hamilton Ventura.....just a 'tad' out of my price range though:(

To answer the original question, anything labelled 'electronic' by definition, will be technically superior to 'electric' though in some of these early movements 'electronic' just meant that a diode had been inserted in the +ve electric feed to the contact wire, but as this has the desired effect of being a spark suppressor, thus increasing the life of the contacts, even that does make it technically superior to 'electric'....

Edited by John_D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not necessarily all of the reliability issues affecting the 500 were engineering ones.  The Hamilton stores, and service outlets, were poorly trained for this whole new world, so couldn't even change batteries easily - they had never done this before remember.  This lack of training lead to the reputation that these couldn't be fixed.

The Rene Rondeau website you link to is the world's leading authority on these movements, so is an ideal place for excellent research.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, scottswatches said:

Not necessarily all of the reliability issues affecting the 500 were engineering ones.  The Hamilton stores, and service outlets, were poorly trained for this whole new world, so couldn't even change batteries easily - they had never done this before remember.  This lack of training lead to the reputation that these couldn't be fixed.

The Rene Rondeau website you link to is the world's leading authority on these movements, so is an ideal place for excellent research.

Very likely Scott, but with all of these really early electric movements, which rely on a wire to make contact with the balance on each beat, they are going to have a much shorter life (I think that two years of continuous running was about the norm for a new movement), than something like the electronic movements such as the ESA 9154 or the Junghans 600 series which do not have any contacts to erode/wear away...Generally 'being fixed' isn't the problem, reliable running for any length of time afterwards, due to the inherent reliability problems pointed to above, are the issue.... So again to answer the original question YES any electronic movements are technically superior to electric ones.........

Edited by John_D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...