Jump to content
  • Sign Up to reply and join the friendliest Watch Forum on the web. Stick around, get to 50 posts and gain access to your full profile and additional features such as a personal messaging system, chat room and the sales forum PLUS the chance to enter our regular giveaways.

Watches for munging about in the hills ...


Jet Jetski
 Share

Recommended Posts

I have read that if you give a man a watch, he will always know what time it is, but if a man has two watches, he will never know the time.  Well, I frequently wear two watches when I am on the hill, and to ensure they agree, I have decided to wear two radio controlled watches.  One I have had for ages, a Casio Pro-Trek, and the other I have just bought from the bay, a Citizen eco-drive satellite wave with GPS timing.  Nice bargain.   BUT.    It is only 100m WR.   I like to wear my left-wrist watch over my jacket whilst hiking, indeed, over my Goretex.  Will 100m WR be sufficient for munging around on the hill for 8 hrs in the wet rain?

download.jpeg.dfe632429310d7fe30fd9e1ed06576d0.jpeg

Edited by Jet Jetski
  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Jet Jetski said:

 It is only 100m WR.   I like to wear my left-wrist watch over my jacket whilst hiking, indeed, over my Goretex.  Will 100m WR be sufficient for munging around on the hill for 8 hrs in the wet rain?

 

I’m sure it’ll be fine, but to make sure, swap wrists and only go when it’s dry rain. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Jet Jetski said:

Will 100m WR be sufficient for munging around on the hill for 8 hrs in the wet rain?

It will probably catch fire, and cause your gortex jacket to increase uniformly in size three fold. May I suggest/recommend Ventile and a stethoscope.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have read that if you give a man a watch, he will always know what time it is, but if a man has two watches, he will never know the time.  Well, I frequently wear two watches when I am on the hill, and to ensure they agree, I have decided to wear two radio controlled watches.  One I have had for ages, a Casio Pro-Trek, and the other I have just bought from the bay, a Citizen eco-drive satellite wave with GPS timing.  Nice bargain.   BUT.    It is only 100m WR.   I like to wear my left-wrist watch over my jacket whilst hiking, indeed, over my Goretex.  Will 100m WR be sufficient for munging around on the hill for 8 hrs in the wet rain?
download.jpeg.dfe632429310d7fe30fd9e1ed06576d0.jpeg

Is this a troll thread?

You wear two watches for walking up a hill? Do you take two pairs of boots too?

I’ve done the three peaks (the proper ones) with only one watch each time and I was fine.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

19 minutes ago, Igerswis said:


Is this a troll thread?

You wear two watches for walking up a hill? Do you take two pairs of boots too?

I’ve done the three peaks (the proper ones) with only one watch each time and I was fine.

I have never needed any of my emergency equipment.

But other people have.  

Two is one, and one is nothing.

You are of course at a disadvantage, language wise. I did not say "up a hill".  The term I used, "On the hill" is a metaphor, a self-deprecatory one used by mountaineers.  The first prolonged period of time I spent on the hill was three weeks in the Bernese Oberland aged 15 carrying full kit, with excursions on rest days up glaciers to the tune of 4000m.  I have spent a lot more time since, much of it on my own.  I want to know where I am, and how many hours before nightfall.  Especially if I am 'towing'.  So no, I don't carry two pairs of boots, but I do carry two watches, two torches, two maps, two whistles, two compasses, etc. generally one attached to my rucksack and one attached to my clothing.

Three peaks lol.

Edited by Jet Jetski
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here is my daughter trying to contain her excitement upon reaching the top of Pendle Hill in the fog and ice of a Winter's day!

1232204151_0cover.thumb.jpg.ccc79ac7ad1668db4426b57cb2013646.jpg

I had to make her do ten press-ups for arriving at the RV looking like a sack of potatoes!

She's over it now.

The Citizen is to replace my Elliott Brown

IMG_20191201_115613180_HDR.thumb.jpg.7995b0fba6cdd7e15274493ef83a0d0f.jpg

 

And this is what happens to the watches I take on the hill ...

No photo description available.

It did go funny after one 'knock' - always sensible to take a spare.

Edited by Jet Jetski
Link to comment
Share on other sites

robert-louis-stevenson.jpg

Under the wide and starry sky,
    Dig the grave and let me lie.
Glad did I live and gladly die,
    And I laid me down with a will.

This be the verse you grave for me:
    Here he lies where he longed to be;
Home is the sailor, home from sea,
    And the hunter home from the hill
.

Robert Louis Stevenson.  1850-1894

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 hours ago, BondandBigM said:

think you're a bit confused, that's Gannex not Gortex 

Exactly. You wouldn't catch Alfred Wainwright walking the fells with 3 watches and 8 torches. A Gannex mac and a pipe was all he needed.

Unlike Harold Wilson, who had the gear, but preferred the Scillys. And Lady Falkender.

  • Haha 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have never needed any of my emergency equipment.
But other people have.  
Two is one, and one is nothing.
You are of course at a disadvantage, language wise. I did not say "up a hill".  The term I used, "On the hill" is a metaphor, a self-deprecatory one used by mountaineers.  The first prolonged period of time I spent on the hill was three weeks in the Bernese Oberland aged 15 carrying full kit, with excursions on rest days up glaciers to the tune of 4000m.  I have spent a lot more time since, much of it on my own.  I want to know where I am, and how many hours before nightfall.  Especially if I am 'towing'.  So no, I don't carry two pairs of boots, but I do carry two watches, two torches, two maps, two whistles, two compasses, etc. generally one attached to my rucksack and one attached to my clothing.
Three peaks lol.

Definitely trolling or you haven’t got a clue what to carry up a mountain.

Do you take two mobile phones too? Might as well take two backpacks and two drones as well.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

This thread reminds me of the occasion when my climbing partner discovered that he'd only brought one crampon :laugh:

As for watches, for ages I used to use this little old thing:

Constant - less than twenty quid from Elizabeth Duke (Argos)
constant.jpg

It's been everywhere from Snowdonia to the Himalayas.  50M water resistance is more than sufficient.

Later on though I preferred to wear a mechanical field watch on my right wrist (something like the O&W M1 or Seiko Alpinist) and something more techie on the left, like an Avocet Vertec Alpine, Suunto X-Lander or Timex Expedition WS4.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Igerswis said:


Do you take two mobile phones too? Might as well take two backpacks and two drones as well.

Yes I take two mobiles, on different networks of course - most of the places I go there is little or no signal strength, but text messages sometimes go through when a voice call will not.

If you are not going to see any sign of human habitation for 10 days, it is normal to have two back-packs - one for 'everything' - tent, camping gear, food, etc. and a smaller one nested inside for day trips from your camp.  This is known as a day-sack.

Even British mountains should not be under-estimated.  The only time I have felt "unprepared" (mentally, not physically) was on the shoulder of Ben Macdui during a freezing rainstorm in what the Scots apparently call "summer", while lunching on sardines and dry Ryvita.

I have a friend who failed his 'Duke Of Edinburgh' award expedition because his only map was torn from the grasp of one of his party in a howling gale on the fells.

So yes - when it has gone dark and we are walking back to the camp-site on country lanes, and someone has no torch, or not checked their batteries, faces turn to look at me.  When I tell someone to walk off into the fog on a bearing of 260 magnetic until I shout stop, and they have no compass, faces turn to look at me.  

I carry a jump-start battery in my car, I have never needed it, but a chap at John Radcliffe hospital did when he left his lights on, and my neighbour needed the compressor when the kids let his tyres down.

Be Prepared.  On the hill, things break, they get dropped (in streams), blown away, sat on, left behind, ruined in rains or waterfalls.  So remember.  Two is one, and one is nothing.

1 hour ago, rhaythorne said:

Later on though I preferred to wear a mechanical field watch on my right wrist (something like the O&W M1 or Seiko Alpinist) and something more techie on the left, like an Avocet Vertec Alpine, Suunto X-Lander or Timex Expedition WS4.

 I am t'other way round - analogue three hander on the left (was a Holton Professional before I accidentally sold it lol), while on the right wrist a Casio pro-trek with barometer and altimeter.  I did buy a Vostok Auto (200m WR) to replace the Holton, but that left The Ukraine on 25th June and has not been seen since.  The Citizen looks to have really good lume, so fingers crossed.

Meanwhile here is a picture of me in the days when I did not have to worry about carrying any watch, or a spare compass, or route-finding, or getting everybody off the hill safely before dark.

IMG_20200808_145545971(1).thumb.jpg.f7b431a97a3276fb2a67b9ec2322b878.jpg

Three peaks lol.

 

 

Edited by Jet Jetski
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 minutes ago, Jet Jetski said:

I think I have seen those tactical ties on eBay, threads coated with titanium nitride silver to reduce bacterial growth if you make a mess of eating your sardines on Ryvita.

 

That tie folds out to make a bivouac, and his braces convert into a handy hammock.

King of the Mountain!

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just now, Jet Jetski said:

seventeen minutes past a chocolate digestive

No, if you set fire to it, it will smoulder at an inch per hour. Very handy in the Peak District.

unnamed.jpg

Not so on the Himalayas though, burn time is longer at higher altitude, so you will require two slide rules to calculate the differential in burn times. Usually around 1/64th of an inch reduction per 2000ft. They haven't got a metric version yet.

  • Thanks 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think this looks quite good though, and it would have been quite expensive new.

Citizen Satellite Wave World Time GPS F150 Watch Hands-On Hands-On

A little bit less in your face than these, although I cannot rule one out, now I have seen Roy's, and learned that you have to set the DST manually on the satellite wave models.

s-l1600.jpg

 

just not sure if these JDM models are tuned to the UK signal.

1 minute ago, WRENCH said:

Very handy in the Peak District.

First song my dad asked the smart speaker to play - sunbathed on Kinder been burnt to a cinder ...

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...