Jump to content
  • Sign Up to reply and join the friendliest Watch Forum on the web. Stick around, get to 50 posts and gain access to your full profile and additional features such as a personal messaging system, chat room and the sales forum PLUS the chance to enter our regular giveaways.

Recommended Posts

Pictures please - front, back and movement at least. There is a listed but undated trademark on Mikrolisk for SUV within a coat of arms that relates to a German company, Uhrenfabrik Suevia GmbH/Schwäbische Uhren-u., based in Sindelfingen. Unfortunately, this mark has not been "confirmed" and may anyway relate to electric and synchronous clocks rather than watches.

I await someone else's knowledge on this brand name, @spinynorman perhaps. Photographs would be very helpful though for dating purposes if nothing else.

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Always"watching" said:

Pictures please - front, back and movement at least. There is a listed but undated trademark on Mikrolisk for SUV within a coat of arms that relates to a German company, Uhrenfabrik Suevia GmbH/Schwäbische Uhren-u., based in Sindelfingen. Unfortunately, this mark has not been "confirmed" and may anyway relate to electric and synchronous clocks rather than watches.

I await someone else's knowledge on this brand name, @spinynorman perhaps. Photographs would be very helpful though for dating purposes if nothing else.

Knowledge is something I'm rarely accused of. I can look stuff up, however. :laugh:

SUV fails to appear in Herr Schmidt's book. Unless it's auto correct for SUA, which he attributes to Suevia.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

@Always"watching" Doesn't look like we're going to get any pictures. Anyway, I've now translated the 2-page history of Suevia in Schmidt's "Lexikon" and it's clear the company never made watches.

He thinks "Suevia" was originally (c1906) the budget brand of Mauthe for alarm clocks and regulators with American movements, sold in department stores and bazzars. It was bought out in 1921 by Gustav Rich, who was a technical manager at Mauthe. In the 1930s it sold living room clocks with mechanical and electrical movements under the brands "Nonstop" and "Rich". It may also have made electrical clocks sold by Mauthe under their own name. During WWII the company made relays and gears for servomotors.

After the war Suevia went back to making clocks with the brands "Ankeruhr" and "Goldanker".  They were sold door-to-door and in trade fairs, rather than through wholesalers. In the 1960s the company supplied electric clocks with synchronous motors to companies like Remington, AEG and IBM.

Production of mechanical  and domestic electric clocks stopped after Gustav Rich died in 1959. The company now made synchronous clocks and timer systems, as well as control units for washing machines. Suevia was sold to a Spanish company in 1996 and still survives, making timers and synchronous motors.

 

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...