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It's a long time since people have shown us how their bonsai are doing so I thought that it was time for us to update things, so let's see how yours are doing now chaps .. :) Here's one of my Chinese Elms, how are yours looking?

 

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Hi Mike

Have to say, Your Chelm is a beauty!! :cool::cool:

 

My trees seem to look worse each year :hmmm9uh:

 

This is a Corkbark Elm that was originally a broom style until it up and almost died, Had to use the two branches that were left to change the style!

dB1aUEO.jpg

 

The bark started coming away this year, I then spotted some steel wire that someone left on the tree decades ago that the tree had grown over!!

sEzamWX.jpg

 

This is a Cotoneaster that I bought from Doncaster Bonsai Bootsale this year, The drum pot was made my Sheffield potter Tony Remington, I won a couple of his crescents on fleabay and collected them from his house, He's a nice fella..

xPEqRBu.jpg

 

A Blue Star Juniper that stabs you every time work is being done!!

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A collected Cotoneaster, Those 4"x2" timbers blew over when I opened the gate on a very windy day, They landed on this tree and split the crown! :mad0218: I wired it back together and applied cut paste, It's still living!!

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A Juniper that I was given back in 2013, Had no idea what to do with it so it was just watered and pushed to the back!, I was off work isolating and had a bash at it..

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Not sure which pot to put it in next spring :hmmm9uh:

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Not sure if this Trident Maple is classed as a Bonsai as it's in a garden planter rather than a dish!, I may stick it in one come spring..

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Abies.

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Acer, Katsura I think, It was a pot plant originall from the garden centre, I was going to remove the top when it was in the plant pot then decided to keep it last minute!

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Little and Large!! Two Junis

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Azalea.

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Hawthorne getting better after being sick, Plonked it straight in to sphagnum moss, Was only supposed to leave it in for one season, It was in three years but bounced back spectacularly from how it looked!!

wb5Qcvp.jpg

 

Various Acers in the cold greenhouse, They go in through winter but the last couple of winters didn't really warrant it!

I6O37hz.jpg

 

 

John :thumbsup:

 

Edited by johnbaz
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Great stuff John ! :) ... That Trident maple looks like it's going to be quite something. Big pots do get pricey though don't they. My Elm has been in a couple of 'final pots' now and manages to outgrow them all just putting on sheer bulk so it costs me every few years !

The wire on the Corkbark Elm is pretty standard. Usually it's left on to just rust away but occasionally can cause problems as you've found, though a Corkbark should recover well OK.

It's been a great year for my trees with the weather we've had, some nice hot spells with plenty of sunshine and good growing weather.

My Shohin semi cascade Hawthorn flowered beautifully and the Shohin Chinese Elm really improved, as did quite a few of the others.....

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This Maple is one that was going to go in the garden as an ornamental tree until my cat used it as a scratching post and broke the top off of it ! :biggrin: ... It's quite a lump and this year has started training, it will be interesting to see if it turns into something worth having in a few years ...

 

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This little Mame Ivy is a bit of a favourite funnily enough. Ivy take so long to thicken up and I got this out of the garden a good few years ago... Fun to try something different at times....

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I must take some photos of some of my others, I have a rather nice Japanese White Pine which has really done better over the last couple of years since I got a better soil mix that suits it much better and the blue colour has really developed and it's growing like mad ! It's always a big job pruning and wiring that one in winter as it's harder to work on than deciduous trees but worth it as I think White Pines are one of the classic Bonsai ...

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WOW!!

Those are superb Mike!:notworthy:

 

Have you ever done an air layer from a larger tree?

I have a Larch that's a bit too tall and there's a rather thick, Long branch that would make a nice shohin, This would let a shorter branch take up the lead and would reduce the tree by a few inches, I've never attempted one before and have been going to have a go for the last three years but have chickened out each time, I read up and Larch aren't the best candidates for air layering :(

This is the one, The layer will be on the right, It's the leader at the moment!

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The proposed new tree..

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And the new leader..

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Here's a chunky Atrapurpureum that I won at the club auction (£25) some years ago, I think i'll put it in a dish next spring as it's been in the plastic bowl all the time i've had it!

It turns some lovely colours but is frowned upon in Japan as being 'Too coarse'!!

7LBWhRM.jpg EFZp94f.jpg xsmvH7E.jpg

I'm unsure of the style of this Hawthorne, It's a bit Literati but I think it has too much foliage to drop in to that category!

TooQsKA.jpg

 

This is a Chamaecyparis (Hinoki Cypress) that responded really well to Biogold, Had the tree for years and it never had much foliage!

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This was only 4 months previous! :thumbsup:

vFmJKTc.jpg

And a few years before..

48bb77F.jpg

 

Cheers, John :)

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Some really lovely trees there John :thumbsup: ...

The Cascade Hawthorn is in fact an air layer from one of my larger Hawthorn bonsai so I'd say have a go at your larch, especially if you intend to lose the branch anyway, an air layer does mean you potentially may get something out of it. I did mine in spring and left it on till the plastic wrap was bursting with roots and that can take a different amount of time for various trees so it's just a question of taking care in doing the job properly and having plenty of patience..

Your Hawthorn is looking nice and healthy. My advice would be this, when in doubt about what to do, don't do anything ....... There's no rush at all with Bonsai and when you're not sure what to do, just let it grow until a very definite plan develops in your mind, in the meantime good feeding and care will build strength and girth and give you the time to make decisions, be that even five or ten years down the line.  I think that there's more harm done to some trees by rushing in with a desire to 'do something' than waiting until you're sure what actually needs doing. Hawthorns aren't easy to style at the best of time so concentrate on health first, the roots on yours look great at the moment and it looks nice and healthy, so you're half way to a really very nice tree there. :)

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2 hours ago, artistmike said:

Some really lovely trees there John :thumbsup: ...

The Cascade Hawthorn is in fact an air layer from one of my larger Hawthorn bonsai so I'd say have a go at your larch, especially if you intend to lose the branch anyway, an air layer does mean you potentially may get something out of it. I did mine in spring and left it on till the plastic wrap was bursting with roots and that can take a different amount of time for various trees so it's just a question of taking care in doing the job properly and having plenty of patience..

Your Hawthorn is looking nice and healthy. My advice would be this, when in doubt about what to do, don't do anything ....... There's no rush at all with Bonsai and when you're not sure what to do, just let it grow until a very definite plan develops in your mind, in the meantime good feeding and care will build strength and girth and give you the time to make decisions, be that even five or ten years down the line.  I think that there's more harm done to some trees by rushing in with a desire to 'do something' than waiting until you're sure what actually needs doing. Hawthorns aren't easy to style at the best of time so concentrate on health first, the roots on yours look great at the moment and it looks nice and healthy, so you're half way to a really very nice tree there. :)

Hi Mike

That hawthorne is a beauty, You obviously can spot the Bonsai in a tree! :thumbsup::cool:



I got in to Bonsai due to boredom back in 1999 when I lost the end of a finger at work, I soon realised it was a long slow process, Glad now that I had the patience!, The only trouble is that the wife gets narky as the whole garden is full of trees, She complains that she can't sit in the garden in nice weather for all the trees, Truth is that she never sat in the garden before I started with them!! :naughty::laughing2dw:

 

Thanks for the Air layering tips, I'm going to have to bite the bullet and have a go!!, Apparently New Zealand are going to stop exporting their excellent sphagnum moss so it will most likely become scarce, I've heard of people using all sorts instead of it for layering!!

 

John :)

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2 hours ago, johnbaz said:

Thanks for the Air layering tips, I'm going to have to bite the bullet and have a go!!, Apparently New Zealand are going to stop exporting their excellent sphagnum moss so it will most likely become scarce, I've heard of people using all sorts instead of it for layering!!

 

John :)

Yes I heard that and funnily enough I bought a couple of packs on Amazon recently to do a couple of jobs with including helping to pot on some Azalea bonsai I'm working on. It's useful stuff for all sorts but especially layering. I'd definitely give the air layer of yours a go as you've nothing to lose, just remember to be patient and you'll find once it gets going it develops roots pretty fast. Once you've been successful you'll be looking at all sorts of trees to air layer all over the place.  :biggrin:

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What a lovely thread! And such wonderful bonsai... :thumbsup::notworthy:

Kristina has a couple of amazing "accidental" bonsai hibiscus plants. The "mother" plant came back from Tenerife in about 1989 and has been tended by Kristina since her mother died in 1991. The mother plant subsequently had a "daughter" plant, which Kristina also tends. These two plants, indoors and in pots for their whole lives, have gradually become bonsai trees and still flower every year.

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