Jump to content
  • Sign Up to reply and join the friendliest Watch Forum on the web. Stick around, get to 50 posts and gain access to your full profile and additional features such as a personal messaging system, chat room and the sales forum PLUS the chance to enter our regular giveaways.

Maybe Not All German Watches Are Equal


Recommended Posts

I normally think of my German friends as being inclined to tell it (more or less) like it is, keen to include lots of technical detail, and lovers of facts.

 

So it was with some surprise that I found the attached.

"WR up to 5 ATM"?

"Sapphire-hardened mineral glass"?

No mention that it's a quartz movement (except in the FAQs)  --  although the price and tenth accuracy chronograph should indicate. (Ronda do make mechanical units).

 

Or am I just being tetchy?

 

https://www.lilienthal.berlin/uk/chronograph-black-orange-mesh-black-brushed-c01-104-b023cb?c=67

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

It must be the virus!

Or maybe a warning to get out of the cheap end of the market and go back to your normal hunting ground?

Anyhow, good to see you back here, you seem to have been a stranger of late.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

For the cognoscenti I guess the layout of the chronograph registers is a give-away but it would have been more transparent to have stated it in the description. As for the "surgical steel" it is bog standard 316 then as it is unlikely to be 420/440

I like the idea that the date window is keeping an eye on the big picture - it must be very comforting! :mad0218:

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
19 minutes ago, Rotundus said:

Why does it say 'made in germany' ? 

Shouldn't it say 'fabricken in das faderland' or something vaguely more suitable ?

No, that's perfectly normal, all my German watches say "Made in Germany" 

large._N8Y6570.JPG.71b8cef679146c2597ab6a1fe1d509b1.JPGlarge._T6A6849.JPG.e91638dd6d94ac29d00c1ceda2827bea.JPGlarge._N8Y6468.JPG.2fcf47410b982ea4406f3642c9bf52f8.JPGlarge._T6A6715.JPG.36ee53dd1a5e02fcc13c24145c3789b1.JPGlarge._T6A6376.JPG.4c8c0ce829e0b4d68882c016f719448b.JPG

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
19 hours ago, JoT said:

For the cognoscenti I guess the layout of the chronograph registers is a give-away but it would have been more transparent to have stated it in the description. As for the "surgical steel" it is bog standard 316 then as it is unlikely to be 420/440

I like the idea that the date window is keeping an eye on the big picture - it must be very comforting! :mad0218:

 

Whilst 316 is often described as a surgical steel 316L as opposed to 316 is the favoured grade for medical implants.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Surgical_stainless_steel

 


 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Rotundus said:

Why does it say 'made in germany' ? 

Shouldn't it say 'fabricken in das faderland' or something vaguely more suitable ?

 

I have eleven German watches. Ten bear the legend "made in Germany".

Only one, the Benziger, uses 'fabricken in das faderland', but he seems to have misspelled it :whistle:

7gF4JK1.jpg

  • Haha 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

Ironically in view of this thread, country-of-origin marks seem originally to have primarily been a response to German industrialization and protectionism. Country-of-origin marking laws were first enacted in the 1880s in various European countries (with the UK in the vanguard with the 1887 Merchandise Marks Act) to distinguish imported goods (particularly those from Germany) from domestic goods. In 1890, the US Congress passed protective tariff legislation - the McKinlay Tariff Act - and in addition to imposing heavy tariffs on imports, this legislation required that imported items be  labelled with their country of origin. Note that the American rules stated that, "Every article of foreign origin entering the United States must be legibly marked with the English name of the country of origin unless an exception from marking is provided for in the law". 

The US Tariff Act, passed in 1890, came into force in 1891, and it then became usual practise for goods to be marked simply with the name of the country. In 1914, the country-of-origin marking law in the States was modified such that the words "Made in" were to precede the name of the country, and from then onwards the Americans frequently reworked and modified country-of-origin marking laws. The US is considered to be among the strictest countries in the world with regard to country-of-origin marking. 

 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
15 minutes ago, Always"watching" said:

Ironically in view of this thread, country-of-origin marks seem originally to have primarily been a response to German industrialization and protectionism. Country-of-origin marking laws were first enacted in the 1880s in various European countries (with the UK in the vanguard with the 1887 Merchandise Marks Act) to distinguish imported goods (particularly those from Germany) from domestic goods. In 1890, the US Congress passed protective tariff legislation - the McKinlay Tariff Act - and in addition to imposing heavy tariffs on imports, this legislation required that imported items be  labelled with their country of origin. Note that the American rules stated that, "Every article of foreign origin entering the United States must be legibly marked with the English name of the country of origin unless an exception from marking is provided for in the law". 

The US Tariff Act, passed in 1890, came into force in 1891, and it then became usual practise for goods to be marked simply with the name of the country. In 1914, the country-of-origin marking law in the States was modified such that the words "Made in" were to precede the name of the country, and from then onwards the Americans frequently reworked and modified country-of-origin marking laws. The US is considered to be among the strictest countries in the world with regard to country-of-origin marking. 

 

Who needs Google when we have @Always"watching" in our midsts !!

:laughing2dw: :laughing2dw: 

 

Edited by BondandBigM
  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...