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The New Rotary Super 7 Scuba Dive Watch


Always"watching"
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(Above pic from watchnation.com)

 

 

 

This short topic comes hard on the heels of my thread-head about the recently launched quartz Sekonda Diving Watch, and it sometimes seems that the classic (now “orthodox”) dive watch form is taking over the world of watches. Indeed, here is another new model on this theme, this time from Rotary, in the shape of the Super 7 Scuba. This watch is a heavy duty automatic diver with a stated water resistance of 30 ATM (300 metres), and the title, “Super 7”, apparently refers to the 7 features that the watch possesses (shades of the reasoning behind the classic “Seiko 5” watches here). The seven features - which are in effect specifications of the Super 7 Scuba - are listed here below together with some comments:

 300 metres water resistance

Miyota 8205 automatic movement with hand-wind; this 21J movement runs at 21,600 bph, has a power reserve of 42 hours, and is accurate to -20/+40 seconds per day. Discussion of whether a superior and more accurate movement could have been used in the Super 7 Scuba has been the main problem area in reviews of the Super 7 Scuba.

Scratch-resistant sapphire crystal; the main crystal is a flat sapphire, giving a clear field of view but with no official mention of an anti-reflective coating.

Dual-coloured luminous hands & markers: The Super 7 Scuba has been praised for the thickness and quality of the lume. The lume is dual coloured with blue on the pip and minute hand and green elsewhere.

Screw-down embossed crown and caseback. The polished crown bears the Super 7 logo, and mention has been made that the crown could have been slightly larger with better access for fingers. The caseback is solid steel and deeply embossed with the feeling of quality about it.

Applied dial markers - stainless steel with thick lume.

120-click unidirectional bezel with pip; the sides of the bezel are milled, polished and slightly angled inwards. The bezel itself takes the form of a ceramic insert but only in the orange and black dial colourways; the green dial and the Pepsi blue and red colourways have steel bezel inserts.

 

 

 

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(Above four pics from watchitallabout.com)

 

 

 

 

In addition to these seven features, the other main specifications for the Rotary Super 7 Scuba are as follows: 42 mm X 14 mm stainless steel case, 48 mm lug-to-lug; case of rounded barrel form polished on the sides but brushed above and below lugs and crown guards. Although a chunky piece of kit, the Super 7 Scuba apparently wears well on the wrist, a fact assisted by the relatively short lugs.

The Rotary Super 7 Scuba is available on a malleable silicon black rubber strap with wave pattern moulding and perforations plus a chunky brushed steel buckle bearing the engraved Super 7 logo. The watch can also be purchased on a solid stainless steel 3 link bracelet featuring a diver’s deployment clasp - with only 3 holes for micro-adjustment where 5 would have been better. The watch comes in four different colourways: black dial/black bezel, orange dial/black bezel, green dial/green bezel, and blue dial/red and blue bezel Pepsi. The watch is guaranteed for two years.

The reviews of the Rotary Super 7 Scuba I have read very much lean towards the positive, and it seems that Rotary have produced a robust and well-specified diver for a price that does not exceed £250 even in its most expensive colourway/version. If there is one notable flaw in the system, it concerns the movement that Rotary have chosen to use. I myself did wonder about the use in the Super 7 of the long-established but perhaps also “long in the tooth” Miyota 8205 movement. This 21J movement runs at 21,600 bph and has a power reserve of 42 hours; all perfectly fine except that it does not achieve the highest levels of timekeeping accuracy. In choosing this movement, ultimate performance has perhaps been sacrificed somewhat in favour of familiarity and low cost. It has to be said, in defence of Rotary, that the Super 7 Scuba essentially majors on its physical strengths as a tool watch rather than on horological perfection, and because it is also deliberately designed to be a budget-conscious product, the choice of movement was evidently constrained.

 

 

 

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(Above six pics from thetimebum.com)

 

 

 

Before concluding this topic with the current prices, I must mention the fact that the equivalent Seiko dive watches (notably the Seiko SKX007) have been mentioned in terms of comparison with the Super 7 Scuba, and the conclusions in the main seem to suggest that the Rotary Super 7 Scuba stands up well in comparison. My own feelings about the new Rotary offering are that the Rotary Super 7 Scuba is a well-made and respectable if somewhat uninspiring addition to the burgeoning number of traditionally styled dive watches; whether or not it sinks or floats in a sea already brimming with traditionally-styled dive watches universe remains to be seen.

Prices for the Super 7 Scuba ( which are still generally consistent among the mainstream retailers) are as follows:

Black and orange dial colourways with black ceramic bezel and stainless steel bracelet, £249.

Black and orange dial colourways with black ceramic bezel and rubber strap, £219.

Blue and red Pepsi and green dial/green bezel colourways with stainless steel bracelet, £229.

Blue and red Pepsi and green dial/green bezel colourways with rubber strap, £199.

 

 

 

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(Above pic from wristwatchreview.co.uk)

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5 minutes ago, Always"watching" said:

If there is one notable flaw in the system, it concerns the movement that Rotary have chosen to use. I myself did wonder about the use in the Super 7 of the long-established but perhaps also “long in the tooth” Miyota 8205 movement. This 21J movement runs at 21,600 bph and has a power reserve of 42 hours; all perfectly fine except that it does not achieve the highest levels of timekeeping accuracy. In choosing this movement, ultimate performance has perhaps been sacrificed somewhat in favour of familiarity and low cost.

I know there are varied opinions on this movement, second hand stutter etc, but In my experience it has been both durable and reliable. It can also be accurate, as the example in my Baltic has proven to be.As you correctly state, it is also readily available and very cheap to replace as well. Over the years I've picked up many battered old watches at boot sales with these movements in them, and without exception, all have worked perfectly well. They are also a popular choice with many microbrands. :thumbsup:

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A different ball game I know, but Rotary nonetheless. 

I bought a new Rotary quartz 5 or 6 years ago from a jeweller for £39 with an RRP of about £130. The advert made a big thing of guaranteed for life but of course only if you sent it back to Rotary for a £35 service every year.

I've always held the opinion that unless it's a high end complex watch then a quartz does not need servicing. Given that the movement is an inexpensive Miyota if anything was faulty on service they would simply replace it I guess, something which I could do for half the price.

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  • 4 months later...

I bought a Pepsi with rubber strap on eBay for £92. It’s a great watch, I had hoped to buy a super 7 bracelet from Watchnation to swap out but it turns out the super 7 bracelet will not fit the rubber strap version at all ( confirmed by Watchnation) this annoyed me as it’s something to do with lug size and hole spacing 

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