Jump to content
  • Sign Up to reply and join the friendliest Watch Forum on the web. Stick around, get to 50 posts and gain access to your full profile and additional features such as a personal messaging system, chat room and the sales forum PLUS the chance to enter our regular giveaways.

Splash Proof Or Water Resistant?


Running_man
 Share

Recommended Posts

So its all bollox then :D

Sorry Stan...gotta give it to Jase...he nailed it on the head (apart from the missing apostrophe, of course).

Plus, everyone knows that when windows are closed the gross weight of the rain in MegaPlozels only applies when square GigaBongles reach a minimum of 50 SnagglePiddlyPooPoos. This is how you properly account for the fart gas variable (mentioned earlier in the thread).

Jeez...do I have to explain EVERYTHING to you people?

Perhaps Watch Lover had it right after all...

"I guess I shall never know as its just impossible to find any authentic information."

...and he seems to feel apostrophes are overrated too...wait...could it be?

I think you are out in your calculations...there should be a point before snagglepiddlypoopoos.it should be .50 SnagglePiddlyPooPoos......is equal to and no greater than 3 to the power of trump.

you need to think out of the box otherwise its just ridiculous

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 162
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

  • 4 years later...

Just read the manufacturers guidelines. They all seem to be different.

To be honest if your going to dive and your life depended on it then you would use the proper gear and not a normal wrist watch.

I can't even swim and I do not do the washing up nono.gif so it would not matter to me anyway. A 1 meter watch would do. laugh.gif

I was once told that if you want a watch for swimming get a screw in crown, except G shock etc, I also would not go for a swim with anything less than 200m. Fashion tricks from manufactures like calling a watch series Neptune which is actually splashproof, does not help. Even some 200m are not rated for aqualung. Only dive certificated are. Seiko 007 and 009 should have a dive certificate. Although most standard Rotary are okay for swimming all day, dolphin standard.

30M PROTECT FROM THE RAIN

50M GOOD EXCUSE NOT TO DO THE DISHES

70M ?

100M MIGHT GET AWAY WITH A DIP

150M SWIMMING SURFACE

200M OKAY FOR MOST WATER SPORTS

300M SAME AND DIVING

500M CHANCES ARE YOU WON'T MAKE IT BACK ALIVE

1000M LOOKS GOOD IN THE BAR

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just read the manufacturers guidelines. They all seem to be different.

To be honest if your going to dive and your life depended on it then you would use the proper gear and not a normal wrist watch.

I can't even swim and I do not do the washing up nono.gif so it would not matter to me anyway. A 1 meter watch would do. laugh.gif

I was once told that if you want a watch for swimming get a screw in crown, except G shock etc, I also would not go for a swim with anything less than 200m. Fashion tricks from manufactures like calling a watch series Neptune which is actually splashproof, does not help. Even some 200m are not rated for aqualung. Only dive certificated are. Seiko 007 and 009 should have a dive certificate. Although most standard Rotary are okay for swimming all day, dolphin standard.

30M PROTECT FROM THE RAIN

50M GOOD EXCUSE NOT TO DO THE DISHES

70M ?

100M MIGHT GET AWAY WITH A DIP

150M SWIMMING SURFACE

200M OKAY FOR MOST WATER SPORTS

300M SAME AND DIVING

500M CHANCES ARE YOU WON'T MAKE IT BACK ALIVE

1000M LOOKS GOOD IN THE BAR

So, basically, you're saying that what it says on here is b0ll0x.....

059-1.jpg

As above, 300m Omega, swim with style.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't intentionally expose a watch to water, but I don't accept any WR rating below 50M. Just a personal preference. (As a general rule of thumb, it appears that most snapback cases are rated at 30M WR or lower but a few are rated at 50M WR; just my observation, accurate or not.)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

For me there's only one reason to wear a watch while swimming - I don't want to get it nicked while I'm frolicking about in the waves. So, rules of thumb apply here and personally, I don't think I'd risk a 'dip in the pool' with less than 100m WR. Based on my limited experience with water...

I've only tried it with three watches, decades ago now - two Roamers and a Seiko. They were all quite new at the time and none of them were diver's. The first Roamer I don't remember what it's rating was, but I did snorkel to ear-painful depths with it a few times without a problem. Then I accidentally crunched it, and It wasn't WR any more..

...so the 2nd Roamer I bought was a 100m WR Rockshell and it kept the water out well for several decades - without any servicing (shame on me), let alone testing the seals. Forty year on though, I did find rust around the stem area.

The Seiko (SQ dress watch) didn't do so well. Don't know the rating, probably 50m, and it soon suffered with ingress of water and rust, after only swimming (no snorkelling). This meant a repair. In hindsight I reckon I was taking a big chance with it, and I was very lucky it was repairable.

So, for my two pennyworth, and given that the average 'dive' is about 2m for 99% of people, I reckon 100m WR gives a fair margin of safety. In the shower? I wouldn't chance it with less than a 50m WR watch.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...