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2 minutes ago, Biker said:

Finishing oil FTW!

Will give it a lovely stain resistant finish which is more wood friendly than varnish. (But don't use it on the Tissot).

:thumbs_up:

Thanks I will look that up or is there one you can recommend 

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On my worktops I alternatively applied 2 coats of Tung oil and 2 coats of Finishing oil, then another 4 coats of Finishing oil and it dried like glass and allows the wood to breathe, the Tung oil is stain resistant.

I always bought mine from Screwfix.

It's also a doddle to apply as you just wipe it on with a rag.

Edited by Biker
sit shpelling
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2 hours ago, andyclient said:

Got a lathe off Father Christmas so had a go at combining hobbies 

Excellent, plenty of time now for distraction away from current events! :thumbsup: 

 

Always had an attraction for wood crafts, found it very rewarding.

My father had a workshop with an old Wadkin lathe he often used, occasionally letting me have a dabble.

Quite a few years ago my wife bought me a lathe for Christmas, with assistance from our son, along with some basic turning tools.  Like most things I do this soon develops into...better tools, additional equipment, more exotic woods.  Along with attempting projects beyond my capabilities at the time. :(

 This hobby was curtailed for some time due to some fairly major back surgery, resulting in not being able to stand in one place for protracted periods of time.  Thankfully all is good now, your post has got me thinking now is the time to get back in the workshop ?

If i may share a few of the completed projects I still have...

30r88Vn.jpg

RreiNn6.jpg

TuLiWaw.jpg

OOFluJt.jpg

0XHalDC.jpg

Ghhbjd9.jpg

Turned from an Banksia nut...

XKmBPZF.jpg

A friend of mine once had a hunting & fishing business which I supplied him with dozens of priests, from 12"-24" long...

qRuTnlh.jpg

Turning a square blank into a dished form is probably the most difficult thing I have attempted, one lack of concentration at the tips & it's F.....! :biggrin:

Nazf2IN.jpg

JbAu611.jpg

 

Enjoy your lathe Andy, I'm sure you will love it :thumbsup:

 

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36 minutes ago, Karrusel said:

Excellent, plenty of time now for distraction away from current events! :thumbsup: 

 

Always had an attraction for wood crafts, found it very rewarding.

My father had a workshop with an old Wadkin lathe he often used, occasionally letting me have a dabble.

Quite a few years ago my wife bought me a lathe for Christmas, with assistance from our son, along with some basic turning tools.  Like most things I do this soon develops into...better tools, additional equipment, more exotic woods.  Along with attempting projects beyond my capabilities at the time. :(

 This hobby was curtailed for some time due to some fairly major back surgery, resulting in not being able to stand in one place for protracted periods of time.  Thankfully all is good now, your post has got me thinking now is the time to get back in the workshop ?

If i may share a few of the completed projects I still have...

30r88Vn.jpg

RreiNn6.jpg

TuLiWaw.jpg

OOFluJt.jpg

0XHalDC.jpg

Ghhbjd9.jpg

Turned from an Banksia nut...

XKmBPZF.jpg

A friend of mine once had a hunting & fishing business which I supplied him with dozens of priests, from 12"-24" long...

qRuTnlh.jpg

Turning a square blank into a dished form is probably the most difficult thing I have attempted, one lack of concentration at the tips & it's F.....! :biggrin:

Nazf2IN.jpg

JbAu611.jpg

 

Enjoy your lathe Andy, I'm sure you will love it :thumbsup:

 

Beautiful work , great skills, thanks for sharing, if I can become half as skilled as you I’d be more than happy 

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You’ll be fine Andy, just apply the same degree of patience, dexterity, as you do with your watch assembly.

Plenty of info on line to assist, research on.

Bear in mind lathe speed is critical, turning from size, roughness of blank to fine finishing.  
Start practicing on old bits of wood knocking about.  Also, be wary of moisture content in the wood, as this can lead to splitting later on, air (sticked outdoor under cover) or kiln dried is best, particularly for hollow or turned boxed items.

However, I did discover an attractive way to improve/cover splits before & after turning.

As @Biker rightly points out, the finishing medium used can make or break piece, resulting In returning the piece to the lathe.

Enjoy!
 

:thumbsup:

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On 06/01/2021 at 12:28, andyclient said:

Thanks I will look that up or is there one you can recommend 

Great to see another woodturner on the forum! While I used to use all sorts of stains and polishes when finishing an item (Carnauba wax was one of the best), I was introduced to a product at a craft show which is fabulous on things like turned fruit and eggs, pens, lace bobbins etc. This is Rustins Plastic Coating, a two part melamine based cold cure lacquer that you brush on, and when hardened, can be sanded and then burnished to a glass like finish. Once set, it will protect the item from damp or stains for ever.

https://www.rustins.ltd/rustins/our-products/indoor/plastic-coating-hardener-gloss

 

I used it on a lot when I had a lathe, and still use it today...the last time was a few days ago on a tensegrity structure that I sent to Honour (@Always"watching" )...I should have taken a pic, but for some reason I didn't, however I did use it on these fruit, eggs and bowls, getting on for 30 years ago...

large.20190824_075502.jpg.37965db81f6453a9120796a6b4375e5a.jpg

large.20190824_075233.jpg.06968df37cc5df32f0ea42d9661206db.jpg

large.20190824_075644.jpg.c47f7d1be14f598536f401f268d80b37.jpg

large.20191023_114742.jpg.6812f79c15aec32edbe341a714707678.jpg

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My dear @Roger the Dodger, I do apologize for not posting a thank-you message on the Forum in addition to the PM I sent you. As you know, I really like the item and have it on display.:thumbsup:

Just to show what the tensegrity looks like, I here reproduce one of your pictures of it, Rog, that you put on your very interesting Forum thread about your tensegrity project, Rog - presumably the finished item but without the final varnish. 

 

 

large.20201212_134908.jpg.d04f3f2d4ee0e4

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22 hours ago, Always"watching" said:

My dear @Roger the Dodger, I do apologize for not posting a thank-you message on the Forum in addition to the PM I sent you. As you know, I really like the item and have it on display.:thumbsup:

Just to show what the tensegrity looks like, I here reproduce one of your pictures of it, Rog, that you put on your very interesting Forum thread about your tensegrity project, Rog - presumably the finished item but without the final varnish. 

 

 

large.20201212_134908.jpg.d04f3f2d4ee0e4

Correct, that one doesn't have the coating on it... just some cheap acrylic spray lacquer.

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@andyclient

Looking good!
Most fruit woods, boxwood (privet), holly, are beautiful woods to turn, but ensure the wood is dry as they are prone to cracking if too green.

Laburnum is a particular favourite of mine, can also be turned (or quarter sawn) into fine sections for decorative oyster inlays.

Sycamore is widely used for kitchen, food applications, due to the antibacterial properties within the wood.

Have a go at making your own beading/gouge tools ?
 

:thumbsup:
 

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25 minutes ago, Karrusel said:

@andyclient

Looking good!
Most fruit woods, boxwood (privet), holly, are beautiful woods to turn, but ensure the wood is dry as they are prone to cracking if too green.

Laburnum is a particular favourite of mine, can also be turned (or quarter sawn) into fine sections for decorative oyster inlays.

Sycamore is widely used for kitchen, food applications, due to the antibacterial properties within the wood.

Have a go at making your own beading/gouge tools ?
 

:thumbsup:
 

Many thanks for that advice, how would I go at making my own tools?

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My son, who is a far more accomplished turner, cabinet maker than me, decided to make his own, rather than spend silly money on the likes of Robert Sorby’s specialist tools.

After acquiring some good quality vintage (scrap) chisels, screwdrivers, he found a local steel stockholders who supplied ‘tool’ steel.  After making a donation to the tea kitty they now let him have a dip in the scrap bin. :biggrin:
The tool steel (tips) is shaped on a grinder, drilled, tapped, tempered, attached to the tapped blank.  Rather than using a flat (chisel) blank, use some round bar (steel stockholder again :biggrin:) which you can form into a curved gouge for working deep into hollow vases, boxes, etc.

Old chisels, screwdrivers are ideal for repurposing into beading tools.  A tool that can make two or three ‘rounded’ beads in one application is so much easier...& quicker!

Similarly, with a brass machine shop he deals with, they let him have the dust, for mixing with epoxy to fill cracks & decorative inlays.
 

Plenty of videos online that detail the above.

:thumbsup:

Edited by Karrusel
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Another watch stand from an old Christmas tree , with a black milliput band and a coat of danish oil. Felt base to be trimmed when set   Really enjoying this so far. Many thanks @Karruselfor the tool tips , will definitely be looking into that   :thumbsup:

Stand

 

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One tool to master is the skew chisel, which can give a superb finish when used correctly. I say mastered, as this is one of the most difficult of all the tools to get right. You only have to have the approach angle slightly off, and it will dig in to the work and literally be thrown across the room. Many's the time mine went flying over my shoulder when I was learning, and it tends to ruin the workpiece, too...so practice on scrap. I found the Sorby oval section one easier to use than the normal rectangular ones. Very good for smoothing, V grooves and making bead edges nice and sharp, once proficient.

img2075.jpg

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16 hours ago, Roger the Dodger said:

One tool to master is the skew chisel, which can give a superb finish when used correctly. I say mastered, as this is one of the most difficult of all the tools to get right. You only have to have the approach angle slightly off, and it will dig in to the work and literally be thrown across the room. Many's the time mine went flying over my shoulder when I was learning, and it tends to ruin the workpiece, too...so practice on scrap. I found the Sorby oval section one easier to use than the normal rectangular ones. Very good for smoothing, V grooves and making bead edges nice and sharp, once proficient.

img2075.jpg

Sounds a bit scary :huh:

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On 16/01/2021 at 16:57, Roger the Dodger said:

One tool to master is the skew chisel, which can give a superb finish when used correctly. I say mastered, as this is one of the most difficult of all the tools to get right. You only have to have the approach angle slightly off, and it will dig in to the work and literally be thrown across the room. Many's the time mine went flying over my shoulder when I was learning, and it tends to ruin the workpiece, too...so practice on scrap. I found the Sorby oval section one easier to use than the normal rectangular ones. Very good for smoothing, V grooves and making bead edges nice and sharp, once proficient.

img2075.jpg

That chisel looks similar to the one i was using at school around 1968 at age 14.I was finishing the centre of a bowl with my left hand on the top of the handle and my right holding the end of the handle.The chisel was resting on the tool rest.Next thing i knew,the chisel flew off and my left hand became trapped between the still spinning bowl and the tool rest.Luckily a fellow class mate saw what was happening and banged the large red stop button on the lathe.

I still have the scar between the two fingers where the spinning wood burned rather than cut my hand.The woodwork master was not overly concerned.I remember his first comment well.  -  "I hope you havent left blood on my lathe"  :swoon: . Different times !.

Edited by champ
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