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Apprentice Watch Technician


krissy1301
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My younger brother, who has a keen interest in horology, has just secured his first job in a watch repair centre where he will be trained in the servicing of watches (I believe the shop is Omega approved, but can't imagine they get many genuine Omega's in for repair).

I suppose my question is a bit on the scrounge:

  1. Does anyone have any tips/advice/recommendations for him going into his first days/weeks? He's the kind who chucks himself in head first and wants to know every detail of a topic
  2. Does anyone have any potentially repairable and very cheap watches they would be willing to donate for him to have a go at? Or similarly, any beyond repair watches he could have a look at stripping down and piecing back together?

Thanks in advance guys, appreciate it!

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My honest advice is do not strip a watch.  The tools he will be using will be far better quality than anything at home (unless he has already spent a fortune) and method and technique will be different.  No point learning bad habits.  Plus stripping and rebuilding a cheap watch is harder than on a quality watch - like taking apart a Renault or a Mercedes.

If he wants to practice then holding a loupe in his eyesocket is a skill, and moving a pile of rice using tweezers into lines will help refine his fine motor skills.  Both will be very useful.  And if he can get a copy of George Daniels book called Watchmaking that will be enlightening for terminology and theory.

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Cheers Scott, I'll pass on the advice. I think he has the (basic) theory of watch movements and how they work but not the detail so thought it might have been useful to see the individual parts in the cheaper watches he will likely be handling regularly. The book will make a handy "congratulations" gift :)

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