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Has anyone had any of these acrylic or composite shower walls fitted, and if so, what are they like?. In another thread I mentioned that I'd had to take out my shower tray as it was broken, and because it had a 'tile over' upstand, the bottom row of tiles on two sides had to be removed, leading to another problem in itself..ie. the walls will need repairing (tile backer board to replace the old plasterboard) and then re-tiled, or covered with the above mentioned acrylic panels. One of the apparent advantages of these panels is that they can be fitted over existing tiles, thus eliminating the need to remove them and cause more damage. Obviously, they are totally waterproof and have no grout joints to leak in the future. Would be interested if anyone has had any experience of them.

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Yep we have them too, we got the plywood sheets with the heavy duty laminate on them, really good.

Went for these as some of the lightweight composite ones have a bit of ribbing in the that you can see on the outer surface, the wood backed ones are perfectly flat.

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19 minutes ago, Roger the Dodger said:

Thanks, all...I think this will be the way forward:thumbsup:. Did any of you remove old tiles, or just go over them?

I removed mine. Two days to get them off, two hours to put the wet wall up !

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A relative of mine used them, looked good, fitting of the panels and base is key, has to be spot on, the contractor that did hers didn't do the best job and after 4 years she noticed leaks

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I had them fitted about 20 years ago. Saw them used in hotels in Asia and Oz and thought they were brilliant. When I decided at add a stand alone shower to my then newly bought house, I found a plumbers supplier that stocked them and when I moved on 10 years later, they were still in place. Everyone commented on them. 

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2 hours ago, Roger the Dodger said:

Thanks, all...I think this will be the way forward:thumbsup:. Did any of you remove old tiles, or just go over them?

Both, one wall was part tiled so I smashed them off, the other wall was tiled so I stuck it on the tiles.  I used generous amounts of Pink Grip adhesive.  :thumbsup:

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Used them in both my bathroom & ensuite as part of my refurb.

Pros:

Hugh coverage

Minimal joints

Pretty easy to fit just use stick like Sh*t

Easy to clean

Lots of choice colour/Patterns

Cons:

Easy to damage, dent makes holes in

I would recommend over traditional tiling.

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5 minutes ago, Craftycockney said:

Used them in both my bathroom & ensuite as part of my refurb.

Pros:

Hugh coverage

Minimal joints

Pretty easy to fit just use stick like Sh*t

Easy to clean

Lots of choice colour/Patterns

Cons:

Easy to damage, dent makes holes in

I would recommend over traditional tiling.

20200823_165640.jpg

20200907_114110.jpg

20200917_125440.jpg

Did you use the composite or the plywood backed stuff?

I've found mine to be robust as fck.

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1 minute ago, Biker said:

Did you use the composite or the plywood backed stuff?

I've found mine to be robust as fck.

Mine was just composite, I didn't know there was a plywood backed version. In my case I had a bell end of a plumber who damaged it whilst fitting. When I got another builder in he managed to fit the entire bathroom without any damage.

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I found the WBP panels by accident at one of our local outlets but they cost about £80 a sheet and knowing how clumsy I can be I decided on the more robust option as I was doing it all myself.  I think I would have made an arse of the composite panels as they are far less forgiving for the amateur.

I would have been that bell-end plumber... many times over.  :whistle:

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The ply backed ones are usually sold as 'aquapanel' (brand name)

Buy good adhesive and the best silicone sealant that you can and it should be good to go.

Factoring labour to fit at a reasonable rate, we didn't find much difference cost wise between tiling and panels. Panels were certainly quicker to install though. And you can get all sorts, including textured if that is your thing.

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8 hours ago, al_kaholik said:

Buy good adhesive and the best silicone sealant that you can and it should be good to go.

Yep, I went a bit cheap on the silicone and had leaks after a few years, so I went upmarket by a couple of quid tube and what a difference.

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1 hour ago, Biker said:

Yep, I went a bit cheap on the silicone and had leaks after a few years, so I went upmarket by a couple of quid tube and what a difference.

My latest discovery is Soudall Crystalfix. Incredible. The blokes fixing the flashing on my garage roof used it and I had previously used. It for my kitchen backsplash and fixing vanity panels to the ends of the cabinets

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Sorry for taking a while to reply, but I've been busy this week starting the remedial work and trying to source the various parts I need as I go along. Unlike a planned shower replacement where everything has been ordered and is already onsite, this was an unexpected major leak which needs to be repaired ASAP...not an easy task when a lot of showrooms and displays are off limits due to covid. Anyhow, I've made a start, and got as far as I can go now until the showerwall samples arrive, when we'll choose an option and get it ordered. The new cubicle has also been ordered and should be here early next week.

This was the original problem...a large crack round the shower waste...this plastic tray is 26 years old, though, so not done too bad.
 

New shower.

The old shower tray was raised up very high to accommodate the waste trap, in this case 200mm (8")....there are much shallower shower traps available today, 100mm deep being a common size.
New shower.

The tray had a 20mm raised lip all round it, two sides of which were tiled over, meaning removing the bottom row of tiles, once the old cubicle was removed.
New shower.

As per usual, the original plumbers had used way too much silicone behind the cubicle uprights, and despite cutting as much silicone as possible with a Stanley knife, in the end, the tiles came away with the uprights, as well as the tiles round the edges of the tray.
New shower.

In the end, I decided to go with showerwall replacement panels, rather than re-tile, and set about removing the rest of the tiles. The right hand wall was 9.5mm plasterboard, dot and dabbed to the outer house wall, the back wall was also 9.5mm plasterboard on studwork. While most of the tiles came away fairly easily, quite a few were stubborn, which led to the inevitable damage to the plasterboard, as there was no solid surface to lever against. Once removed, the old tile adhesive was removed with a scraper.
New shower.

The damaged sections were neatly cut out with an electric multitool, ready for repair. Instead of using plasterboard again, I used a totally waterproof tile backer board which is very easy to cut and very rigid. It's basically a foam core with a thin resin/cement coating on both sides. On the solid wall, I used Pinkgrip (solvent free) to fix it, making sure it was flush with the existing surface, but to screw it to the studs on the back wall, special stainless steel discs are used to prevent the screwheads pulling through.
Damaged plasterboard removed.
New shower.

 New shower.

All damaged sections replaced with tile backer board (Wedi board).
New shower.

These are the SS discs for screwing to studwork.
Roger's Miscellaneous Album.

The new shower tray has been fitted and the waste connected. The last job to do before moving on when the showerwall panels arrive is to go over the whole lot with some diluted PVA to seal all the surfaces...especially in the few places where the surface paper has come off the existing plasterboard. Will keep updated...as I mentioned, samples of showerwall are on the way...expected Monday, then there will be the wait for whatever we choose to be delivered. That may be a week away yet.

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Another quick update: The shower wall samples arrived today, and very impressed with them! We ordered samples of 'White Sparkle', 'Gloss White' and 'White strings'. White Sparkle is a nice, bright white with a faint background pattern and iridescent flecks in it, White Gloss is as its name suggests, a very bright, shiny white, and the White Strings is slightly creamier with silver lines running down it. We went for the White Sparkle. 

The panels are 10mm thick and very rigid...I couldn't bend the samples at all. I tried cutting with a fine panel saw and it cuts very easily, and it also cuts very well with a hole saw for the shower outlets. I've ordered it as a two panel kit, which comes with everything required to fit, including the corner and edge profiles in chrome finish, the bottom seals and all the adhesive and silicone needed, though I may upgrade the silicone if it's a cheap one. We always used 'Forever White' when installing showers in new builds as it's a top quality, mould resistant silicone. Delivery is 3-5 days, so watch this space.

White Sparkle (with a slot where I experimented cutting it).
New shower.

'White Strings' (with an experimental 40mm hole sawn in it).
New shower.

'Gloss White'
New shower.

The panels are hollow PVC with a rigid ladder construction, and are tongue and grooved if you want to go wider than the 1m width of the 2.4m high panels.
New shower.

 

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