Jump to content
  • Sign Up to reply and join the friendliest Watch Forum on the web. Stick around, get to 50 posts and gain access to your full profile and additional features such as a personal messaging system, chat room and the sales forum PLUS the chance to enter our regular giveaways.

How many 'twiddles' is wound enough on an auto?


Recommended Posts

I have a Hamilton Khaki Mechanical which I gently wind till it stops. 

An Orient Monarch which I gently wind till the power reserve gets to 40.

On autos I dont know, sometimes I count to 20, 3 times. Sometimes I count to my age, 46. 

Im talking about 'twiddles' which must be about 120° to 150° of a crown turn not a complete 360° turn. Just a thumb and finger 'twiddle'. 

How many 'twiddles' would you input to get an auto going to set it and wear it for a day. Seiko Alpinist, Timex Marlin, Smiths Everest, Laco Augsburg etc. Nearly all my movements will be ETA 2824, Miyotas or Seiko. 

One cheeky wee question Ill throw in for good measure, Seiko non hand windable autos such as 7S26. How long does it need the Seiko shuffle to get it going accuratly? It will start by virtually picking it up. But if you set it straight away and sit and watch the tele it isnt going to wind up very much is it, and we are always told to wind watches fully before setting for accuracy. 

Stay safe, and order another watch.

Cheers 

Edited by Dilly
Link to post
Share on other sites

I never wind an auto.

I just put it on and wait until I notice it's started up (typically within 5/10 minutes of starting to wear it depending on how much I'm moving about and how much attention I'm paying) and then set the time and date (as long as it's not a couple of hours either side of midnight of course).

I've never noticed any issues setting the time without full wind on any auto.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Just a couple of turns to get it going, and a bit of a shake for me, but yes if you are not moving much - as happened in lockdown - people have reported their automatics stopping.

 

And yes, most timing figures are done after a full wind.

 

I have developed the intermittent nonchalant wrist shake anyway, and caught myself doing it several times today with my hand-wound Sturmanskie.

 

Generally though you could be able to feel the difference between winding against the spring and winding against the clutch.

 

It is correct that some automatic movements don't take kindly to being hand wound, and should be given minimum twiddle, but I could not tell you which ones, so I play it safe, except my Miyota 8215 which I used to hand wind quite a bit to make sure it kept going for my long term test, and the Miyota 8215 is quite a cheap movement to replace if necessary.  Then I remembered I had a double winder standing idle.

 

Get a winder.  I put my Ball on the medium setting during the day, so it will definitely net gain, but of course it runs down quite a bit overnight when I am wearing it while asleep, and I cannot be bothered to hand wind it as it is a screw crown.  It is my night time watch because it has tritium tubes.  Get a winder.

Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, Jet Jetski said:

Just a couple of turns to get it going, and a bit of a shake for me, but yes if you are not moving much - as happened in lockdown - people have reported their automatics stopping.

I can't see how this happens. even on the most sedentary day there is still movement to shake a rotor. A service is perhaps required rather than an issue with the watch

Link to post
Share on other sites
15 minutes ago, al_kaholik said:

I can't see how this happens. even on the most sedentary day there is still movement to shake a rotor. A service is perhaps required rather than an issue with the watch

I've had automatic watches stop on me, usually on holidays and in the first lock down even my LV stopped on me all be it after a couple of weeks lying borderline comatose on a deckchair. 

:laughing2dw: :laughing2dw:

I have a cheapie auto with a power reserve indicator and even after a full power wind it's surprising how low it can  get when I'm just layed around. 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
21 minutes ago, BondandBigM said:

I've had automatic watches stop on me, usually on holidays and in the first lock down even my LV stopped on me all be it after a couple of weeks lying borderline comatose on a deckchair. 

:laughing2dw: :laughing2dw:

I have a cheapie auto with a power reserve indicator and even after a full power wind it's surprising how low it can  get when I'm just layed around. 

 

Time for an Oysterquartz?:thumbsup:

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, al_kaholik said:

I can't see how this happens. even on the most sedentary day there is still movement to shake a rotor. A service is perhaps required rather than an issue with the watch

I have not experienced this myself, but I take the opposite view, that if a watch is left off overnight, and people don't leave the house, as many people have not unless necessary (whether theoretically allowed to or not), a net decline in the main spring tension could quite easily be observed, if the winding requirement is 800 or more full turns per day (in the correct direction).  Especially as the watch is traditionally worn on the inactive wrist.

Interestingly, advertisements for Harwood's first automatic wristwatch showed the watch being worn on the active wrist - holding a tennis racket or a cigarette, for example.

Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, Jet Jetski said:

I have not experienced this myself, but I take the opposite view, that if a watch is left off overnight, and people don't leave the house, as many people have not unless necessary (whether theoretically allowed to or not), a net decline in the main spring tension could quite easily be observed, if the winding requirement is 800 or more full turns per day (in the correct direction).  Especially as the watch is traditionally worn on the inactive wrist.

Interestingly, advertisements for Harwood's first automatic wristwatch showed the watch being worn on the active wrist - holding a tennis racket or a cigarette, for example.

I guess with some types of older automatic this may be the case, a bumper maybe which isn't as efficient as winding. 

Thinking about how easily the rotor swings, just look at the exhibition case back on a Seiko 5 for example, making a cup of tea, walking to the toilet, even changing the channel with a remote. Even more so with the proliferation of smartphone use will wind if the worn wrist is moved. Perhaps not enough to fully tension the mainspring but certainly enough to get it going. 

With a lot of modern autos having 40-50+ hours reserve and efficient mechanisms, small movements must translate to winding which delivers good power. 

Is an interesting experiment I'd like to see

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, al_kaholik said:

Thinking about how easily the rotor swings, just look at the exhibition case back on a Seiko 5 for example, making a cup of tea, walking to the toilet, even changing the channel with a remote.

Yes, Seiko 5s are famous for that efficiency and responsiveness.

 

2 minutes ago, al_kaholik said:

Is an interesting experiment I'd like to see

I thought you would never ask!  That sounds like a jolly good excuse to get a 'Red 12' Seiko Presage, with power reserve indicator.

Hands-On Review - Seiko Presage SPB041J1 - Vintage Flair ...

I once passed on the opportunity to get the 'normal' version of this, without PR, at half RRP. One of those moments when my brain deserted me, and I thought for a moment that I had 'enough' watches ....  :laughing2dw:

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
21 hours ago, Perlative Cernometer said:

On a Sellita as little as possible and hope it doesn't start to make horrible wrong noises as the teeth strip off the ratchet wheel! Not that I'm bitter or anything.

Oh! That's not good to hear! I've just bought a hand winder with a Sellita movement! Can you enlighten us to your woes?

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Eddiex said:

Oh! That's not good to hear! I've just bought a hand winder with a Sellita movement! Can you enlighten us to your woes?

Regular weakness on the SW200 autos, apparently, better but still not unheard of on later SW200-1 versions where the teeth on the ratchet wheel strip when hand winding. On a hand winder you should be OK, they'll have been designed with a hand wind as the principal method of winding so should be a bit more robust. If you look carefully here you can see what happened to the guts of my Spinnaker though - look near the "B" of bronze at the bottom & you can see the gaps in the teeth on that wheel.

p?i=c81db8bc79d90bd54c70b93809265425

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...