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Hi. I've had an old mahogany wall clock for years. It used to be a headmasters clock in a victorian school. Would anyone know what the markings MASH mean. The face also states ILFORD. Presumerably this must be the clockmaker but I've never been able to find out. 

Thank you. 

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4 hours ago, WEXFORD63 said:

Hi. I've had an old mahogany wall clock for years. It used to be a headmasters clock in a victorian school. Would anyone know what the markings MASH mean. The face also states ILFORD. Presumerably this must be the clockmaker but I've never been able to find out. 

Thank you. 

We really need pictures - either post links to your pictures on a hosting site like Flickr, or use the free trial of the gallery here.

https://thewatchforum.co.uk/index.php?/subscriptions/

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10 hours ago, WEXFORD63 said:

Hi. 

Here is a photo of the clock face, showing the markings.

IMG_20210413_133858_resized_20210413_013923025.jpg

Thanks for the picture. Mash is a fairly common surname in Essex (assuming it's an English clock) but I can't find a clockmaker of that name anywhere, let alone in Ilford. Unless there are other marks on the case or inside, I think the maker will remain a mystery.

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Hello again. 

Thanks for trying to help me with this. It's not essential I know but having had this clock ticking away in my home for 20 yrs or so, I looked at it one day with curiosity. if it remains a mystery, thats fine. I can simply make up some exotic journey the clock made in my head. 

I have managed to take it down and photograph what looks like the school name and signiture on the back, although I can't quite make it out myself. The date of installation looks like 28/11/1937. It was a school headmasters clock. Signature looks like JC. I also found a little no imprinted into the back of the face plate which was 1290. I think i will remove the movement and face sometime to see if there is anything else to be seen.

IMG_20210414_114157_resized_20210414_114700104.jpg

IMG_20210414_114208_resized_20210414_114659693.jpg

IMG_20210414_114216_resized_20210414_114658974.jpg

IMG_20210414_114257_resized_20210414_114658304-1.jpg

IMG_20210414_114305_resized_20210414_114657646.jpg

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33 minutes ago, WEXFORD63 said:

Hello again. 

Thanks for trying to help me with this. It's not essential I know but having had this clock ticking away in my home for 20 yrs or so, I looked at it one day with curiosity. if it remains a mystery, thats fine. I can simply make up some exotic journey the clock made in my head. 

I have managed to take it down and photograph what looks like the school name and signiture on the back, although I can't quite make it out myself. The date of installation looks like 28/11/1937. It was a school headmasters clock. Signature looks like JC. I also found a little no imprinted into the back of the face plate which was 1290. I think i will remove the movement and face sometime to see if there is anything else to be seen.

IMG_20210414_114157_resized_20210414_114700104.jpg

IMG_20210414_114208_resized_20210414_114659693.jpg

IMG_20210414_114216_resized_20210414_114658974.jpg

IMG_20210414_114257_resized_20210414_114658304-1.jpg

IMG_20210414_114305_resized_20210414_114657646.jpg

Those could be from servicing or repair, so not necessarily the installation date. The first one looks to me like "Church RC School". Do you know where the school was?

Typically the name on the dial would be someone who might trade as a clockmaker, but would in fact just buy the clock in complete and resell it. The movement may give more clues as to who actually made it. Strangely many of the Mash people I've found around Ilford were potato growers.

Edited by spinynorman
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Ha ha. MASH. It sounds so obvious really, although my surname is Murphy, so my predecessors had the market in potato growing. I think the school was in Waltham Forest from memory. I will take a closer look at the movement to see if there are any more clues. Thanks again.

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Dear @WEXFORD63I have also taken a look at this query and, like @spinynorman, I have been unable to connect the name "Mash" with any known clockmaker or retailer of clocks.

It is very difficult to accurately date your clock from its style and external construction, although I believe that the font used in the lettering on the dial probably places it in the 1920-1950 period. If, as seems likely, your clock was used by a school - possibly one sponsored by the Roman Catholic Church - it raises the question as to what type of organization supplied the clock to the school: was it bought in on an individual basis by the school, was it a gift, or did a wholesale church/school supplier provide it?

As a final note, the name "Mash" is rather interesting, but I won't go into that here. :)

 

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Hello @Always"watching" and @nevenbekriev. Thanks for you input. It is a fusee movement and works beautifully. Would there be any markings on the actual fusee anywhere that I could look for that might be of any value. Slightly separate to me original question, when I acquired the clock, the movement did not work. When I looked, the chain had been disconnected. I researched and then followed guidance to clean it (very carefully) and oiling (again very carefully and using a tiny amount of oil) and managed to follow advise again to get that tint chain back on and line it up. That was a long time ago and it has worked perfectly since. Every now and then, it makes a noise, almost like it slips. I am not sure how to describe it. I have used that noise as a signal to wind it and it always needed a good number of turns to wind it fully at that time.  I was just curious if that would be normal? I am no expert, always curious and very practical. Thanks.

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Dear @WEXFORD63 and @nevenbekriev, I have had a look at my copy of "Collectible Clocks 1840-1940" by Alan & Rita Shenton and the authors show a number of dial clocks including a few that are very close to your own example even down to the typeface used for the maker's/retailer's surname and address. It would appear that the use of the fusee in these clocks was a hangover from an English tradition and continued well into the twentieth century in British-made office, railway and factory clocks. With regard to the typeface used on the dial of your clock and the use of a fusee in what may well be a British clock movement, I believe that your clock probably dates from the early years of the twentieth century up to some time in the 1930s. With a bit of luck, there may be something stamped somewhere on the movement to give us a clue as to its origin.

I'm sure that someone on the Forum will be able to give you advice about the slippage you are experiencing with the clock; I myself am not qualified in that department.:)

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On 16/04/2021 at 18:25, Always"watching" said:

...I'm sure that someone on the Forum will be able to give you advice about the slippage you are experiencing with the clock; I myself am not qualified in that department.:)

No problem, this is verry common. What happens is that few coils of the main spring stick together when the spring is wound, and in some moment, they detouch from each other when spring is unwinding. The bad thing here is that when this happens, significant portion of energy is released and the chain may get  broken.  Normally, this kind of sounds are sign that it is allready time to service the movement. The service must include dissassembling the barrel, taking the spring out, cleaning all, lubricating and assembling it. In old clocks with signs of ware of the spring ocsidation, it is goot to use lubricants with graphite or molybdenum disulphite

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