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Pocket Watch Advice


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Being on here has inspired me to dig into the back of the watch drawer and pull out the two pocket watches my Father-in-Law gave to me about 10 years ago. One had been his fathers and one had been his uncle's (I'm not sure which way round, he'd remember).

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He had given me both, knowing I had an interest, as non-working, and I'd left them on the side for a month or so then chucked them in to the drawer to look at "sometime" during a tidy up.

I have just had a little piddle about with the Ingersoll, wound and set it and it is ticking away (with a great deal of volume to the tick it must be said) and appears to be keeping almost perfect time.

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Having seen Scottswatches excellent work cleaning and tidying up those old watches the other day, I am thinking about getting him to price up a good clean up of this, before I get a pocket chain and gift it back to my FiL, quite chuffed with it to be honest.

The Waltham appears a bit more of a problem, firstly the lack of any glass is not ideal (I presume it might be difficult to locate a glass that fits the watch and sits inside the cover (any advice here greatly appreciated), but potentially more terminal for and old watch of little to no value, it seems to be seized solid.

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It's a shame as I think it is the more attractive of the two and having a cover is nice if you are going to actually have it in a pocket, but the crown won't wind at all (it does pull and allow me to set the hands with no resiatance).

I think I will get a price from the guy I have used to service my own watches, but fear that it is going to be more than I would consider throwing down the drain on this, but again I would welcome any thoughts, hints, tips, advice, as I would love to get it working again, and re-glassed so that it can be enjoyed again.

As a final point, if anyone has any ideas of the best places to start trying to get some understanding of the age or really any information about either of these (beyond pocket watch and the maker, I have nadda!) please do share!

Thanks all.

Colin

 

A toothbrush and some soapy warm water with a dry cloth has worked a treat on the Ingersoll, which has now kept time for 20 minutes!

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Hi Colin, 

 

The Ingersoll has a very basic pin pallet movement, hence the noise.  These unjewelled movements are usually +2/-2 minutes a day, and anything better is a great result.

The Waltham will have a better movement, and this will help date and identify what you have  https://pocketwatchdatabase.com/search/serialnumber/waltham

I have just got one with screw in chantons fitted to the movement, which would be rare to find on anything under £10k on a wristwatch.  But lots were made, and values are low as the buyer/seller ratio favours the buyer.  Any watchmaker should enjoy working on it though - nice and big, and good quality.

I don't take in repairs - I just did DaveyP's as a random act of kindness.  But if you can take a good picture of the movement I might be able to see if anything obvious is seized.  Glasses are readily available from Cousins, though they may need to be glued in.

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8 minutes ago, scottswatches said:

Hi Colin, 

 

The Ingersoll has a very basic pin pallet movement, hence the noise.  These unjewelled movements are usually +2/-2 minutes a day, and anything better is a great result.

The Waltham will have a better movement, and this will help date and identify what you have  https://pocketwatchdatabase.com/search/serialnumber/waltham

I have just got one with screw in chantons fitted to the movement, which would be rare to find on anything under £10k on a wristwatch.  But lots were made, and values are low as the buyer/seller ratio favours the buyer.  Any watchmaker should enjoy working on it though - nice and big, and good quality.

I don't take in repairs - I just did DaveyP's as a random act of kindness.  But if you can take a good picture of the movement I might be able to see if anything obvious is seized.  Glasses are readily available from Cousins, though they may need to be glued in.

Awesome, I'll get the back off after the school run.

And apologies for posting to the wrong forum!

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Well, this is turning into a journey!

I went to open the back and found, another back!

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I had no idea that there was a cover over the back case the same as over the glass

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So, anyway, onwards to the actual movement:

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This wheel spins freely, and when I give it a flick with the end of the knife, the watch starts to work for a few seconds (until the wheel stops spinning back and forth.

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These two buggers (I call them "little and large" in honour of the 80's comedy geniuses) and the little clip on the screwnext to the serial number move about 5-10 degrees when I try to turn the cron before stopping.

1tbncYF.jpg

 

Oh, and you are not wrong about the Ingersoll being a little less intricate inside! :laughing2dw:

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try and warm the Waltham up, like wrapping it in a tee shirt and putting it on a warm radiator.  Once it is warm give it a flick of the wrist, and see if anything moves.  if the oils are old and dirty the warmth can lower their viscosity and the wrist flick might just start it.  The incorrect but widely used term is overwound, which often can be rescued with a bit of routine servicing.

The top bridge, the plate that look like an elephants trunk, has four oiling points for the pivots that look dry.  Don't try and oil it yourself unless you have the right oil and experience - too much oil can be worse than too little

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44 minutes ago, scottswatches said:

try and warm the Waltham up, like wrapping it in a tee shirt and putting it on a warm radiator.  Once it is warm give it a flick of the wrist, and see if anything moves.  if the oils are old and dirty the warmth can lower their viscosity and the wrist flick might just start it.  The incorrect but widely used term is overwound, which often can be rescued with a bit of routine servicing.

The top bridge, the plate that look like an elephants trunk, has four oiling points for the pivots that look dry.  Don't try and oil it yourself unless you have the right oil and experience - too much oil can be worse than too little

I wrapped it in an old cloth and sat it in front of the little plug in fan heater I have under my desk for 10 minutes, then gave it a little wiggle, it has been ticking away for the past 5 minutes!

You, Sir, are an absolute scholar.

I am now off hunting for a 40.7mm watch glass (any advice regarding the gluing of which would also be greatly appreciated, whilst I wholeheartedly apologsie for bothering you so much and taking up your time on here today).

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53 minutes ago, nevenbekriev said:

Hi Colin,

I will only advice to wear the watches for a day or two in You pocket and only then to deside if they keep time and are ready to be returned to You wife's father. You may be don't want to dissapoint him...

The Ingersoll, which I have now confirmed was his father's watch, is still ticking away perfectly and is within a minute after nearly 24 hours, so I'm happy and confident that is going to be OK for now.

The Waltham (his uncle's old watch) is losing a full minute every hour that it runs, but also stops on occasion (sometes after an hour, best it lasted was nearly 5 hours) so I feel that one is going to need looking at and servicing by someone smarter than I.

I've ordered a crystal and some glue and will run it over to a local friend that tinkers to see if he can revive it as I don't want to blow the value of a professional service if it is beyond saving.

Thanks all, especially scottswatches for the help and advice, it's inspired me to purchase some books and some broken up watches to start actually learning a little more about the what and how inside of watches.

:thumbsup:

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The Ingersoll is keeping excellent time (between a minute and 2 minutes lost per day) I have managed to date it to 1892. I have managed to remove the movement and use the little ultrasonic cleaner on the case and crystal and it is looking smart. I have ordered a chain for it and a little cardboard  display box and will be gifting it back to my Father in Law once it is all here and ready for him.

The Waltham dates to 1908, but is currently losing about 5-6 minutes per day. I have again managed to remove and replace the movement, and given the case a good go in the cleaner, and it is nice and shiny and clear of all gunk. I have toyed with the idea of having a go at it myself, but decided to buy a cheap manual wind off EBay to practice on first, the movements look very similar, and I'd rather f-up on something that has no sentimental value before trying anything more than taking it out and putting it back in again!

'Tis fun and exciting to be starting the journey inside the watch case though.

 

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36 minutes ago, Bricey said:

I have managed to date it to 1892

Are you sure? I'm no expert, but I thought Ingersoll in the UK was early 20th century and the Triumph model was post WWII. Lovely watch anyway, great you could bring it back to life.

Edited by spinynorman
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17 hours ago, spinynorman said:

Are you sure? I'm no expert, but I thought Ingersoll in the UK was early 20th century and the Triumph model was post WWII. Lovely watch anyway, great you could bring it back to life.

Think you are right having done further reading (including on this site).

I had taken the reference off of the movement and found a guide dating it as that, but I don't think it is right.

Looking smart now the chain has arrived...

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