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Your thoughts/feelings on manual wind


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I'm always curious to hear what others think of manual wind movements, as an in comparison to automatic mechanical kind of thing.

Personally, I just can't help but really dig them. Admittedly I can't precisely say why, or give an educated reason as to that slight preference. Perhaps it's because I've just had so many automatics that I'm simply tired of them. I do love the look of a highly decorated manual behind glass. Or combined with that there's the thought that there's less complication about them, fewer moving parts, so an illusion of longer life is involved in the thought process? I don't actually think that though, a rotor doesn't really add that much to it. Maybe it's nostalgia, a preference to pay tribute to the mechanical titans of yesteryears.

What are your thoughts on manual mechanical movements?

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I love it on my Speedmaster as you can see the movement in all it's glory through the case back with no rotor in the way but the winder is small and awkward to wind , my other hand wind are a Timex Sprite which has a tiny winder and is also stiff(don't like the process) my other two are hamilton khaki's they are butter smooth with large winders that are a joy to operate, just something good about hand winding a watch!

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My preference. Autos are fine and convenient if you are wearing the same watch for a period of several days or more, but I do enjoy that brief daily interaction with a manual.

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With autos, I tend to give them a little swirl to them going, then let my movement 'charge' them. It leaves me wondering if its charged enough near the start not to lose time and so I give them some shakes. I shouldn't, but I do. In a way, they get a little bit more rough treatment.

In comparison, a manual wind takes very little time to 'set up'. You can feel that point where the spring is just beginning to reach its max and leave it there. You know you now have 40 hours or so. You don't need to give it any shakes. It probably gets gentle treatment.

But its that point, that tiny little moment where we feel the spring reaching it's peak.. thats the satisfaction. That's the direct connection we get with the mechanical object that 'ticky tocks' all day by our command and alive because we made it happen. 

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11 minutes ago, SolaVeritate said:

With autos, I tend to give them a little swirl to them going, then let my movement 'charge' them. It leaves me wondering if its charged enough near the start not to lose time and so I give them some shakes. I shouldn't, but I do. In a way, they get a little bit more rough treatment.

In comparison, a manual wind takes very little time to 'set up'. You can feel that point where the spring is just beginning to reach its max and leave it there. You know you now have 40 hours or so. You don't need to give it any shakes. It probably gets gentle treatment.

But its that point, that tiny little moment where we feel the spring reaching it's peak.. thats the satisfaction. That's the direct connection we get with the mechanical object that 'ticky tocks' all day by our command and alive because we made it happen. 

Shaking a watch will do precisely nothing of harm to it unless you are a loon .... you can still feel the point near full tension on the spring with autos if you wind slowly .... There is not a huge amount of difference if you think about it between manual and auto in many many instances.

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12 minutes ago, JonnyOldBoy said:

Shaking a watch will do precisely nothing of harm to it unless you are a loon .... you can still feel the point near full tension on the spring with autos if you wind slowly .... There is not a huge amount of difference if you think about it between manual and auto in many many instances.

There's a huge amount of difference with every single one of my watches. What I was describing is the difference between winding a watch and not winding a watch because Jay asked for thoughts on manual mechanical movements. If you think they are just the same thats fair enough.

Just for the record, I have a watch that if you set the time backwards, it begins to run backwards. (at least for a couple of seconds until I panicked and set it forwards). I have been curious as to repeat the incident but I don't want to break it. Its just one of those quirks that make all my toys a little different from each other. They all have personalities. 

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I'm of that pre-quartz generation that generally grew up with mechanical watches. I have one now and I would quite happily own another, but not solely because it was mechanical, but because the watch I liked happened to be mechanical. 

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1 hour ago, AVO said:

My preference. Autos are fine and convenient if you are wearing the same watch for a period of several days or more, but I do enjoy that brief daily interaction with a manual.

I have quite a few hand wound watches and I too like that daily interaction as part of the more pleasant routines in life. Besides, movements without that rotor in the way are a lot more interesting and, to my eye, beautiful pieces of machinery.

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36 minutes ago, SolaVeritate said:

Just for the record, I have a watch that if you set the time backwards, it begins to run backwards. (at least for a couple of seconds until I panicked and set it forwards). I have been curious as to repeat the incident but I don't want to break it. Its just one of those quirks

 

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I love mine (primarily because it has a lot of sentimental value) but also because I like having to wind it daily. It's a daily interaction with the watch you don't get with automatics/quarts (that sounds really sad when I read it back).

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Manual wind every day. Wind it up first thing and you don't have to be worried about shaking, (or being inactive) to keep things going. Your watch can be left unworn from morning to evening after winding, and it will still be running. 

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I am going to be unpopular here, I prefer an auto because I'm lazy and keeping them on winders means I can pick up and go each morning.

However, I do agree that hand wound movements look much nicer as a general rule.

I did accidentally buy a hand wound watch recently (it was wrongly listed as an auto and I didn't check) and I have to say I love it and it will happily stay in my quartz box now. I do enjoy the watch as a morning wear, wind and set a couple of times each week.

I'd buy another, I'd actually like another, hand winding watch, but a modern one rather than another vintage watch, but modern hand wound seem to either be really cheap tat or super expensive brands, I'm struggling to find a middle ground other than the Chinese stuff, some of which I quite like but I'd prefer a dial that uses a language and alphabet that I understand.

Hamilton do a few, but I don't really want another field watch.

Any suggestions for a modern hand winder on a budget, something I'd have a chance of finding Sub £200 (pre-owned is fine, so maybe something £300-400 new)?

 

 

Microbrands are fine by me, but aiming to avoid fashion brands and high end is outside of my budget.

 

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3 hours ago, JayDeep said:

I'm always curious to hear what others think of manual wind movements, as an in comparison to automatic mechanical kind of thing.

Personally, I just can't help but really dig them. Admittedly I can't precisely say why, or give an educated reason as to that slight preference. Perhaps it's because I've just had so many automatics that I'm simply tired of them. I do love the look of a highly decorated manual behind glass. Or combined with that there's the thought that there's less complication about them, fewer moving parts, so an illusion of longer life is involved in the thought process? I don't actually think that though, a rotor doesn't really add that much to it. Maybe it's nostalgia, a preference to pay tribute to the mechanical titans of yesteryears.

What are your thoughts on manual mechanical movements?

I also enjoy hand-wind watches, and have a few Unitas powered watches, a few Vostok / Poljot and several pocket watches, I enjoy the winding, the interaction with the watch and feeling for the point when it is fully wound.

large.1192191776_GlycineLagunare.jpg.890570a92015c72c6e742ea962a20a39.jpglarge.678666520_IMAG20462.jpg.e18fc46f554540ee41bd4f3771e13d13.jpglarge.1382571176_Vostok1965.jpg.6e084eacafb5b74639873418851e5e13.jpglarge.1430430421_IMAG18682.jpg.6f06a5dbc8605e112fc54efee63ea5ec.jpglarge.DSC05847.JPG.47b44437832e2d5b56a012d4fc1eafde.JPGlarge.2012898083_IMAG18102.jpg.842685f7b12ae87ce4318aaf35e14b1e.jpg

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1 hour ago, SolaVeritate said:

There's a huge amount of difference with every single one of my watches. What I was describing is the difference between winding a watch and not winding a watch because Jay asked for thoughts on manual mechanical movements. If you think they are just the same thats fair enough.

Just for the record, I have a watch that if you set the time backwards, it begins to run backwards. (at least for a couple of seconds until I panicked and set it forwards). I have been curious as to repeat the incident but I don't want to break it. Its just one of those quirks that make all my toys a little different from each other. They all have personalities. 

Yeh I get that .... my point is perhaps more about autos not getting the "winding attention" they deserve ... I am possibly going to buy a Panerai manual wind this year if I try one on and it wears well .... so I get the manual thing, hopefully soon to join the club ...

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4 hours ago, WRENCH said:

Wostok-Vostok-2403-581881-Watch-17-Jewel

£57 + post + tax.

preview_watermark5d43bb35e33dd7df8499270

£45 + post + tax

Sadly, my Russian is no further advanced than my Chinese :laughing2dw: although the fact that there is a much plainer dial helps a lot.

I am quite taken with these:

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/353461212420

s-l1600.jpg

s-l1600.jpg

Might go on the list for a fathers day gift idea (which will remove the cost of it from my watch "budget" whilst also meaning I will never flip it!)

 

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44 minutes ago, Bricey said:

I am going to be unpopular here, I prefer an auto because I'm lazy and keeping them on winders means I can pick up and go each morning.

However, I do agree that hand wound movements look much nicer as a general rule.

I did accidentally buy a hand wound watch recently (it was wrongly listed as an auto and I didn't check) and I have to say I love it and it will happily stay in my quartz box now. I do enjoy the watch as a morning wear, wind and set a couple of times each week.

I'd buy another, I'd actually like another, hand winding watch, but a modern one rather than another vintage watch, but modern hand wound seem to either be really cheap tat or super expensive brands, I'm struggling to find a middle ground other than the Chinese stuff, some of which I quite like but I'd prefer a dial that uses a language and alphabet that I understand.

Hamilton do a few, but I don't really want another field watch.

Any suggestions for a modern hand winder on a budget, something I'd have a chance of finding Sub £200 (pre-owned is fine, so maybe something £300-400 new)?

 

 

Microbrands are fine by me, but aiming to avoid fashion brands and high end is outside of my budget.

 

I can't recomend the Hamilton Khaki high enough , Seen em around the £200 mark used , rrp starts at £395 paid £335 new for the white faced one

 

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5 minutes ago, midnitemo said:

I can't recomend the Hamilton Khaki high enough , Seen em around the £200 mark used , rrp starts at £395 paid £335 new for the white faced one

 

I had the automatic version (because I wanted to be like House M.D.) and that was a lovely watch in terms of quality for the money, really lovely, but as much as I tried to get on with it, and kept it for well over a year, I guess I'm just not a military watch type. I seem to split pretty 50:50 between 'dress' watches (or certainly more formal, smart wear) and divers watches.

I appreciate that this deducts a huge part of the pool to chose from, but we all like what we like.

 

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2 hours ago, Bricey said:

Sadly, my Russian is no further advanced than my Chinese

You'll be ok, their analogue watches are also 12/24 hours. :laughing2dw:

For the sake of durability/simplicity, anything with an Eta 2801 or a Unitas 6897 or 6798 movement is a safe bet. I've also had a couple of Asan "6897/8" powered watches that have been both accurate and reliable , which were sub £50 new.

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5 hours ago, JoT said:

I also enjoy hand-wind watches, and have a few Unitas powered watches, a few Vostok / Poljot and several pocket watches, I enjoy the winding, the interaction with the watch and feeling for the point when it is fully wound.

large.1192191776_GlycineLagunare.jpg.890570a92015c72c6e742ea962a20a39.jpglarge.678666520_IMAG20462.jpg.e18fc46f554540ee41bd4f3771e13d13.jpglarge.1382571176_Vostok1965.jpg.6e084eacafb5b74639873418851e5e13.jpglarge.1430430421_IMAG18682.jpg.6f06a5dbc8605e112fc54efee63ea5ec.jpglarge.DSC05847.JPG.47b44437832e2d5b56a012d4fc1eafde.JPGlarge.2012898083_IMAG18102.jpg.842685f7b12ae87ce4318aaf35e14b1e.jpg

Mazda? Love the Wilson at the bottom!!!

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Having multiple watches I find I am a bit more likely to pull a manual wind out to wear than an auto... and more of my watches are auto than manual.

If I was a one watch guy I think I would go with an auto but there's something cool about picking one out and winding it, wearing it and then returning it to its place.

Seem to be wearing a 1959 IWC cal 86 in platinum most of the time.  I can't put my finger on why I like it so much. 

 

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My point of view is simple (and oft-stated here). Nobody with a mobile phone truly "needs" a wrist watch. Therefore, a watch is really jewelry. Therefore, it should be as easy on the eye as possible.

Many aspects of a watch can be beautiful, and that would certainly include the movement. "Beauty is in the eye of the beholder" is, IMHO, one of the wiser aphorisms, but, to my eye, a rotor (and the space which needs to be found for its rotation) can detract from the attractiveness of a movement. Hence, 50% of my small collection of mechanical timepieces are manual wind.

 

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I’m very new to this hobby but I’ve always like the idea of a manual wound watch and to the end recently purchased a Smiths PRS29 military.

Time factors now put a Selitta movement as I understand that the previous ETA was becoming harder to source.

I really like it but I’m worried about overwinding it! I’ve been assured that you wind until you feel resistance and that’s what I do every morning- a nice little ritual for me![emoji51]

7c5a64458296fb9482ebc0038fa182b1.jpg


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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have a had a couple of eta 2801 and unitas powered watches. 

i ilke 'em !

have found both to be very consistent when gently wound twice a day. 

personally i'd rather there were more hand winder and fewer auto options really.  

you dont even need a reserve indicator as the increased friction tells you you are there ...

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