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Changing the battery on a Raymond Weil Parsifal ladies watch - doing it myself


BooJewels
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I posted this as part of a discussion about Raymond Weil Watches, but think it best to put it here.

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I'm only not wearing my Parsifal at the moment as the battery has gone.  Having had it from new, I've always sent it away for what is referred to as a 'minor service' - just a battery change and pressure testing.  I was very disappointed after the last one that it cost a tidy sum and wasn't even cleaned and there were scratches around the screws - I found it was just sent to some authorised service house, not RW themselves - and was gone for many weeks.  I'm gradually talking myself into changing the battery myself this time, as I simply can't afford the fee.  I routinely change watch batteries etc. and don't see why I can't do this one (and my TAG Aquaracer which has also gone down at much the same time) - but there's talk of some models being pressurised - I assume that only refers to watches like yours above, where waterproofing is a salient feature of the design?  I don't even wash my hands wearing a watch, so diving is never going to be in the watches future.

If I'm careful with the seal and put it in a pot of silicone grease whilst I change the battery and am careful with the screws, is there any reason why I can't just do it myself?

 

This is the watch, front and back.  My main concern, is whether it might be pressurised, as some models are said to be - and best left to experts.  I'm thinking it's very unlikely, as it isn't a diver or one intended for wet use (only 'water resistant'/5ATM), so I expect that the back will simply remove with the 4 screws shown - I expect the back panel to lift right off and there to be an O ring inside, along with what is likely to be a disappointingly small quartz movement, with a big spacer ring.

Anything else I should be wary of?   

Ideally, I'd like to take the back off first, to see what battery it takes, so that I can add it to an order I'm about to place, if it's not one that I keep in, then put it back lightly until it arrives.

RWFront_20210512_213133.jpg

 

RWBack_20210512_214817.jpg

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2 hours ago, Biker said:

I can't see any reason on this earth as to why it should be pressurised. 

Personally, I would just go for it.

Thanks - I'm pretty much decided to do so.   I just wanted to ensure there wasn't any reason why I was taking an unnecessary risk.  I'm not even sure why it's making me so twitchy about doing so.  It's not like I don't pop the backs off other watches for fun - I routinely change batteries for myself and family.

As you say, there's nothing about that watch that would necessitate it being pressurised and I suspect going on about pressure testing during their 'minor service' is just a way to justify a nice fat fee and make you feel obligated to keep doing down that route by making it sound much more technical.  In discussion with my husband, we decided that I've probably now spent more on batteries than he paid for the watch initially (he got it at a good price).

When I thought about why I continued to 'get it serviced', it was because I wanted a good service record, in case I ever wanted to sell it.  But as I'll never part with it anyway, that's a moot point.

 

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Will do.  I had a blitz a couple of months ago getting loads of watches re-going, cleaned etc., as I'm clearing my parents' house and lots of watches came to light in various states of disrepair, plus I too had gathered a lot of fashion watches with dead batteries.  Many of those have since been cleaned, re-powered and sold, in favour of the vintage inherited numbers that I like wearing better.

I also have a TAG that's flat, so might tackle them both tomorrow, as my husband is out for a bit, so I might get some peace.

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I now feel a bit grubby - firstly, for spending so much money on getting these minor services on the watch for over 20 years and secondly for being such a pussy about having a go myself.  I mentioned this to my son and his comment was "yes, but it's your Raymond Weil, it's special to you, so bound to add an additional level of nervousness about taking it apart".

Anyway, it was stupidly easy.  The screws weren't even tight - unscrewed, but stayed in place in the little recess, allowing me to pick them out carefully and into a screw top jar (I've ordered spares for future, that way I won't ever lose one).  I'd already selected the right size screwdriver and polished any burrs off the head, to minimise chewing.  Only a simply o ring seal and an easy to get at battery.  New battery and silicone grease ordered and will re-assemble once here.  Just taped the back in place until then.  I have however cleaned under the flanges since I took the photo - which was largely for my own future reference.

I cannot however get the back off the TAG Aquaracer, that's really screwed in tight and is waterproof, so I'll leave that for now.

RWInside_33864f_sm.jpg

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Battery and silicon received today, so watch was re-assembled and cleaned and I'm happy that it's working well again. 

I popped a new battery in and just taped the back on whilst I let it run for a while to check all was okay.  Then back re-screwed in place (and I didn't chew the heads!).  Working just fine.

It took me longer to order the bits I needed than it did to do the job.  I feel a bit of a dufus now!  But it's nice to enjoy the face of an old friend.

 

RWworking_20210517_140418.jpg

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Thank you kindly.  I have a flat TAG too - but that is 300m waterproof and the screw back is on very tight, I truly can't shift that at the moment, so it'll be Plan B for that one. 

I have a mesh bracelet to grind down to better fit an imperial set of lugs, so that's my next job (easy, done it several times) then a watch where I want to totally replace the movement - it's quartz and I have a replacement the same already for it.  The hands are the only bit that worries me, so I might do a dry run on something in my broken watch box first.  I've bought some tools, which were cheap, so I want to polish and refine them a bit first.

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Great result, Boo and I'm so happy to see a lady member getting stuck in! Is your Tag caseback completely flat or does it have square recesses round the edge like this...
Seiko Sawtooth

If so, it can be opened with a 'Jaxa' tool, which locates in 3 of the squares. 

Waterproof Screw Case Back Opener Large XL Jaxa Wrench Watch Repair Tool |  eBay

If it is totally flat with no recesses or knurling (like a Rolex) then a 'Sticky ball' may be your answer. This is a sticky rubber ball that you press on the caseback and it twists it off. Available everywhere...Cousins UK, Eternal Tools, Red Rooster UK, ebay etc. as is the Jaxa tool above, if you don't already have one.

How to Open a Screw Down Watch Back with a Case Opener Ball - YouTube

Hope this helps a bit...:thumbsup:

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Very many thanks for the assistance Roger.  It has the square recesses as in your Seiko example and I have a case back removing tool as you showed - it fits and I can get a good grip with it, but the back is just on tighter than my own strength.  My husband is in hospital at the moment (and is weak as a kitten these days anyway), but my very large son will be visiting in a few days and was going to get him to have a try - maybe between the two of us we can work it loose. 

With being a ladies watch, the case is quite small, so there's not as much watch to get a good grip on to hold with your other hand - I've managed with stubborn gents watches as you can get a better grip with them.  I've got various holding tools and clamps, but prefer the sensitivity of fingers on something delicate and I wear grippy work gloves to prevent slippage.

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