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Help identifying Benson watch


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Hello, first time watch buying trying to get a piece that I can pass down some day. I’ve found this benson watch for sale and am trying to get an idea on what’s the history behind it. The photos sent the best but this is all I have and hopefully someone from here can help. 

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9 minutes ago, T3heli said:

Hello, first time watch buying trying to get a piece that I can pass down some day. I’ve found this benson watch for sale and am trying to get an idea on what’s the history behind it. The photos sent the best but this is all I have and hopefully someone from here can help. 

Well need some information/pictures please.

 

 

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Hi

J W Benson was established in London 1847.

However, they  stopped producing their own movements when their factory was destroyed by bombing , in 1914.

They continued retailing, under the own brand name, using (mainly) imported quality Swiss movements.

Your example is an 9k open faced hunter, A. L. Dennison cased, Birmingham 1929, utilising  a Vertex (Revue) 15 jewel lever movement.

HTH.

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29 minutes ago, Karrusel said:

Hi

J W Benson was established in London 1847.

However, they  stopped producing their own movements when their factory was destroyed by bombing , in 1914.

They continued retailing, under the own brand name, using (mainly) imported quality Swiss movements.

Your example is an 9k open faced hunter, A. L. Dennison cased, Birmingham 1929, utilising  a Vertex (Revue) 15 jewel lever movement.

HTH.

The movement looks very similar to my old Waltham pocket watch

3ipRulB.jpg

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Is this something worth getting? I’m new to pocket watch scene  but always wanted something older that I could pass down. I know that we don’t do values because your not appraisers but would you be able to say that 900 pounds Is a fair price for a piece like this? As far as I know it’s just the watch which is fine for me.  Anything I should look at when I go to view and potentially buy? Someone suggested I weigh it, does anyone know what the weight should be for this watch? Thanks again for all the help. 

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1 hour ago, T3heli said:

Is this something worth getting? I’m new to pocket watch scene  but always wanted something older that I could pass down. I know that we don’t do values because your not appraisers but would you be able to say that 900 pounds Is a fair price for a piece like this? As far as I know it’s just the watch which is fine for me.  Anything I should look at when I go to view and potentially buy? Someone suggested I weigh it, does anyone know what the weight should be for this watch? Thanks again for all the help. 

If I were you I'd start with something a lot cheaper than £900. Whoever told you to weigh it was probably thinking you could estimate the value of the gold from the weight, but that really isn't helpful advice for appraising a watch. Look at auction sites, go to auctions and watch fairs when you can. Take note of the prices that pieces actually sell for. You want something that is in good condition and working, because these can be very expensive, or impossible to repair. The seller needs to be someone you know you can trust. Or, set your sights a lot, lot lower in price and be prepared to make mistakes.

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If you are fairly new to the pocket watch scene then I would certainly spend time and energy looking at, reading about, and handling pocket watches before taking the plunge to buy something substantial. The learning process doesn't exclude the possibility of acquiring the odd piece, and may actually benefit from such acquisitions. However, I am in full agreement with @spinynorman when he recommends starting with something a lot less expensive than £900, with the emphasis on "A LOT LESS".:)

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Here are some more photos that I’ve taken from it. I end up buying the piece after all and hopefully it’s something that I didn’t go to overboard on but it runs well and excited to have a piece of history. 
https://imgur.com/gallery/9IqZbIY

 

The gentleman also gave me another clock that I’m also interested in the history about and plan to keep it as well. Below is the link to that clock which I gather is an Arizona clock. 

https://imgur.com/gallery/IvEX2Bd


 

 

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@T3heli the Benson looks like a nice clean example

As Karusel mentioned the company stopped making their own watches during WW1

Post 1914 watches were typically branded Benson and assembled using Swiss movements, the cases and dials would also be from third party manufacturers, nothing wrong with that of course many watch brands still do this today!

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On 06/06/2021 at 17:31, T3heli said:

The gentleman also gave me another clock that I’m also interested in the history about and plan to keep it as well. Below is the link to that clock which I gather is an Arizona clock. 

Maybe autocorrect tripped you up, but it's an Ansonia clock, made by the Ansonia Clock Company, originally of Ansonia, Connecticut. According to various books, Ansonia clocks were marked "New York" from 1878 on. The company had an office in London and often appears in "The Watchmaker & Jeweller, Silversmith and Optician" journal of the 1870s-1890s, either in reviews of interesting new models or as a creditor to British firms in liquidation.

If you're interested in the history I suggest you sign up for a free account at The Internet Archive and take the option to "borrow" relevant volumes.

American Clocks for the collector: E. J. Tyler https://archive.org/details/americanclocksfo00tyle/page/n5/mode/2up?q=ansonia

Encyclopedia of antique American clocks: Swedburg, R. W. & H. https://archive.org/details/encyclopediaofan00robe/page/18/mode/2up?q=ansonia

Price Guide to Antique Clocks: Swedburg, R. W. & H. https://archive.org/details/priceguidetoanti00swed/page/26/mode/2up?q=ansonia

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