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New one in - Seiko Actus


Marcin
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Arrived today from Japan. Seiko Actus made in February 1977, when I was born. Good condition for its age, great size and fit. It made me happier than any other, more expensive watch I bought before.

20210615_132214

 

20210615_132223

 

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February 77, man you're old.

I was born in April 77 and so am considerably younger.

Lovely looking watch, I do truly love the idea of birth year watches (I have 2) it has such perfect symetry, a watch, timekeeping, the ultimate period of time for anyone being their own lifetime, it is just a beautiful thing. Someone should make a business out of it :thumbsup:

 

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20 minutes ago, JayDeep said:

Not my style at all but love the name "Actus". Like active but a formal Latin version.

It’s means driven. 
 

 currus ab auriga actus est = The chariot was driven by the charioteer.

yet more useless knowledge for you.

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30 minutes ago, AVO said:

It’s means driven. 
 

 currus ab auriga actus est = The chariot was driven by the charioteer.

yet more useless knowledge for you.

Not really, a chariot would be driven, a horse would be ridden, etc. It means the object has been used for its purpose. It could be translated as "action" but not used without a object to have its purpose of "doing" what it would be described as. There is no need for the verb because it is implied by the noun. See what I mean?

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4 minutes ago, SolaVeritate said:

See what I mean?

Not really, since this is the Perfect Tense, Passive Voice. The word currus therefore is, ipso facto, not an object at all but a subject. 
 

One could, however, render the sentence equally well using the Active Voice:

auriga currum egit - The charioteer drove the chariot.

The sentence quoted was merely a grammatical example to illustrate to the use of the Perfect Participle Passive.

Please forgive my ignorance; I have only been teaching Latin for 32 years so I’m a relative beginner.

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1 minute ago, AVO said:

Not really, since this is the Perfect Tense, Passive Voice. The word currus therefore is, ipso facto, not an object at all but a subject. 
 

One could, however, render the sentence equally well using the Active Voice:

auriga currum egit - The charioteer drove the chariot.

The sentence quoted was merely a grammatical example to illustrate to the use of the Perfect Participle Passive.

Please forgive my ignorance; I have only been teaching Latin for 32 years so I’m a relative beginner.

Fair enough.. :notworthy:

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On 15/06/2021 at 10:56, AVO said:

It’s means driven. 
 

 currus ab auriga actus est = The chariot was driven by the charioteer.

yet more useless knowledge for you.

I think it was kind of obvious no? Fundamental Latin.

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