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Prob a stupid question…


coffeekid
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Sorry if this is a stupid question - I’m new to the world of watches, so prob the first of many…..

just bought myself a Tudor Black Bay Chrono last week. In terms of placement of the watch when not wearing it, should I leave it face up, on its side, something else? Or does it not make any difference?

 

 

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13 minutes ago, Thrudge said:

I always leave mine face up and have never had a problem. I'm happy to be corrected, but I don't think it makes a difference.

BTW, not a stupid question and congratulations on getting the Black Bay, they are lovely. Photos would be much appreciated!

Trying to figure out how to add a photo

https://m.imgur.com/t9e2mAE

Here it is - hope link worked

 

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 Sometimes a different resting position overnight can give a different result.   It’s worth experimenting. For example, if your watch gains three seconds during the day, try to find a position that causes it to lose a little overnight if you can. 

 Understanding the rate of your watch in different positions can help you to maintain a high degree of accuracy over a longer period. 

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Watches can be adjusted to maintain timekeeping with little variation between positions, however Rolex used to provide a card explaining how to leave your watch depending whether it naturally gains or loses in your particular usage pattern.

Typically watches gain if laid flat, because gravity would make the balance spring microscopically conical; while vertically they are prone to lose time, I think because the balance and wheels are suspended between both bearings, rather than just sitting on one, so a tiny bit more friction, notwithstanding gravity having a different deformative effect on the balance spring, but crown up or down does make a difference.  

Try each position and see. The better your watch has been adjusted, the less difference you will detect.

Both my adjusted 2824-2 ETA watches keep good time in any position, on the winder, or table, or wrist, I can't remember the last time I had to set them.

My cheapest auto loses fractionally on the winder (vertically) so I have to leave it dial up on the desk (flat) for a day or so now and again.  I do remember the last time I set it - the day the clocks went forward.  I am expecting that I will only need to set the time the day the clocks are put back.  It cost around £60.00, but as another member said, accuracy can be maintained by utilising the fact that watches, even adjusted ones, are frequently slow in one position, and fast in another.

Watches are generally more precise when they are fully wound, automatics, of course if worn, tend to remain well wound, and there are several designs of balance spring on the market today made so light, with modern materials, that they are - it is claimed - almost immune to deformation caused by gravity.

So I imagine the difference between positions will be easier to adjust for the modern manufacturer, and we have to ask ourselves would we prefer a watch that inexorably gains one second per day whether on the wrist or off, or a watch that loses two seconds per day on the wrist, and re-gains them overnight on the bedside table?

Or get a quartz watch.

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2 hours ago, coffeekid said:

Thanks, that’s very interesting.  The watch seems to be losing around 1 second per day. I’ll try different positions over the next while and see do any make it better or worse

Minus 1 second a day is very good, and well within COSC range (-4 to +6 seconds) not sure of Tudor apply the same -2 to +2 seconds Rolex is reputed to use but if they do it is also within that range.

1 second a day means your watch is 99.999% accurate

 

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Well done in the acquisition. I'm on the waitlist for that guy and the more time that passes, the longer the ETA seems to grow (I think that says more about how important I am to my AD but hey-ho). 

All mine spend most of the time face up due to living in my watch boxes but I can't imagine that:

a) it really matters

b) you'd find consistent data to support what's best after normalising daily usage, servicing, ambient temperature, atmospheric pressure yada yada yada

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  • 1 month later...

It may be the "Analisity" in me, but I always lay mine face up and on a soft cloth (microfibers work great). If I lay them on their side, it is always with the crown up, I just cringe when I see a watch sitting on it's crown. Again, on a microfiber cloth. Also, if that watch has a bracelet, I never place it face up unless there is a cloth between the back of the watch and the bracelet These are stored this way, as well, if there is no room in the watch boxes (that's always the case!). Even casually laying them down, never on as surface that even has a chance to scratch them. Again... I'm a little anal about some things (Watches, guns, knives and my fishing equipment!).

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3 minutes ago, JayDeep said:

Doesn't really make a difference at all. 

Oh it does.  I recommend an app called watch checker, I have found most interesting results for several of my watches.

If it made no difference, then the specification for a chronometer would not require that the precision at each of the positions should not be too dissimilar, and I have the timing charts from my Armand Nicolet watch from the lab that tested it before it was sold.

Regardless of what people may argue about in terms of brand 'froth', Rolex know a thing or two about adjusting watches, and were the first company to have a wristwatch certified as a chronometer in 1914.  They would hardly draw attention to how to correct imprecision using different positions, if none was likely, or indeed inevitable.

Many Omega movements were adjusted to only two positions, and, if memory serves, those positions would be dial up and crown down, and not adjusted so that they were equally precise, but so that the imprecision of 'crown down' (while the arms is by one's side) was countered by an opposite and, as far as possible equal, imprecision, when dial up - the time lost on the wrist during the day thereby regained on the night stand while you slumber.

Of course, if you never wear a watch on consecutive days, and are used to setting the chosen watch every day, then it is immaterial.  But I do not think that was the intent of the OP.  And the more modern, expensive and technically advanced your watch, down to the very lightness of the hairspring, the further these woes will retreat, but for most mortals' everyday wristwear, they are ever present.

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44 minutes ago, Bow said:

I always told my kids that there are no stupid questions only stupid children. :yes:

My children have proven many times that there are indeed many, many stupid questions.

I have illustrated to them that equally stupid answers are possible.

 

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11 minutes ago, Bricey said:

My children have proven many times that there are indeed many, many stupid questions.

I have illustrated to them that equally stupid answers are possible.

 

My daughter is the queen of deftness.

She steadfastly refused to carry a donor card because “it will hurt”

”what will?”

”when they take my kidneys and stuff”

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On 02/09/2021 at 15:00, Jet Jetski said:

Top tips from Rolex:

 

Rolex Accuracy Toolwatch Blog

And some explanations which may be a bit more scientific than mine.

https://watchesbysjx.com/2020/02/positional-error-and-accuracy.html

PTO

4. To lose as many seconds as possible:  Lay the watch vertically either way uppermost on a hard surface, then strike with considerable force using a 3lb hammer once, or repeatedly until the watch stops.  If the watch refuses to restart, don't worry, because in 30 years time you will still be able to sell the resulting mangled heap of smashed crystal, case, cogs and gears for 20 times what you paid for it.

:laugh::laugh:

 

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On 03/09/2021 at 10:32, Jet Jetski said:

Oh it does.  I recommend an app called watch checker, I have found most interesting results for several of my watches.

If it made no difference, then the specification for a chronometer would not require that the precision at each of the positions should not be too dissimilar, and I have the timing charts from my Armand Nicolet watch from the lab that tested it before it was sold.

Regardless of what people may argue about in terms of brand 'froth', Rolex know a thing or two about adjusting watches, and were the first company to have a wristwatch certified as a chronometer in 1914.  They would hardly draw attention to how to correct imprecision using different positions, if none was likely, or indeed inevitable.

Many Omega movements were adjusted to only two positions, and, if memory serves, those positions would be dial up and crown down, and not adjusted so that they were equally precise, but so that the imprecision of 'crown down' (while the arms is by one's side) was countered by an opposite and, as far as possible equal, imprecision, when dial up - the time lost on the wrist during the day thereby regained on the night stand while you slumber.

Of course, if you never wear a watch on consecutive days, and are used to setting the chosen watch every day, then it is immaterial.  But I do not think that was the intent of the OP.  And the more modern, expensive and technically advanced your watch, down to the very lightness of the hairspring, the further these woes will retreat, but for most mortals' everyday wristwear, they are ever present.

In regards to this watch, it really shouldn't matter at all. It's a Tudor adjusted in 5 positions to COSC spec as far as I know, so unless that's wrong information I have, I stick with my post, it shouldn't matter to any degree that is worth discussing as far as I'm concerned. But that's based on my lack of care of how accurate a watch is, comparatively speaking. As long as it's within a minute per day I'm more than fine. 

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