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Vintage watch advertising


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47 minutes ago, Karrusel said:

It surprises me also that history doesn’t give, deservedly, proper recognition to this innovation.

Indeed, it was such a well thought out design.

If anyone wants to know more about the watch, I recommend David Boettcher's article on them  

https://www.vintagewatchstraps.com/waterproof.php#Submarine

47 minutes ago, Karrusel said:

Similarly, concepts, inventions by the likes of Robert Hooke (Lever escapement), John Arnold (Tourbillon). 
 

:thumbsup:

Hooke also demonstrated a sprung balance  many years before Christiaan Huygens who is normally credited with the invention (although to be fair it is the Huygens design that is closest to what we use today)

Arnold and Breguet were great friends (Arnold's son was even an apprentice of Breguet) I believe there is evidence that Arnold had allowed Breguet to use any of his developments in his watches. So many things we think of a solely Breguet can be attributed to Arnold. The overcoil balance spring is one that comes to mind. Even the engine turned dials and general proportions that are a hallmark of Bregue's work are heavily influenced by Arnold's work

 

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24 minutes ago, animalone said:

Arnold and Breguet were great friends (Arnold's son was even an apprentice of Breguet) I believe there is evidence that Arnold had allowed Breguet to use any of his developments in his watches. So many things we think of a solely Breguet can be attributed to Arnold. The overcoil balance spring is one that comes to mind. Even the engine turned dials and general proportions that are a hallmark of Bregue's work are heavily influenced by Arnold's work

 

Very true!

When John Arnold passed, Breguet presented John Arnold’s son, John Roger, with his first tourbillon escapement housed  in a Arnold case, in appreciation of their friendship.  Also acknowledging the concept was his father’s (John Arnold).

This timepiece, along with note, is now on display in the British Museum.

Similarly, Breguet’s son was, also, apprenticed to John Arnold.

 

Must dash now, having to bolt doors, raise the drawbridge, before the French/Swiss National Guard arrive?
:evil9kf:

Edited by Karrusel
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On 27/07/2021 at 17:15, Bricey said:

Timex advert

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I've no idea where it came from originally, I saw an ebay advert selling it once and just found it on Pinterest of all places through Google.

 

Coronet was a Chicago-based general interest monthly magazine distributed across north American that began publishing in 1936 and ceased publishing in around 1971.  Amongst other things, it was know for its gift ideas section, possibly why it was attractive to Timex as a place to advertise - in this case page 94 of an edition likely dated between 1952 when Rocky M won his first WHC fight and 1956 when he retired.

On 27/07/2021 at 20:18, artistmike said:

A nice early Speedmaster advert. :)

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Yes folks, if you wear a Speedy now you too can pretend to be as cool as Howard Wolowitz :tongue::laugh::laugh:

I suppose that was using the ambassador promotional model before there were brand ambassadors.  Thinking about it, it seems the art of selling watches hasn't changed much in 50 years.

27 minutes ago, animalone said:

If the monkey was blindfolded possibly:bash:

That would be a "chimpanzee minkee"; "...a businessman..." who "...pays for his own room and board..."  But does he wear a Breitling? :hmmm9uh:

Peter Sellars, John Bluthal and Herbert Lom at their best :laughing2dw::laughing2dw:;

 

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 28/07/2021 at 07:41, artistmike said:

We do take having the correct time always available, something we now really take for granted. The BBC time signal didn't come into effect until 1924  and the phone 'pips' not until 1936, so prior to that it was a question of finding a Regulator to sync your watches and clocks to. Time is, and always has been, 'money' ... :)

Did you hear the tale about a vicar who 

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8 minutes ago, Ugg10 said:

Interesting on the price £113 in 1981 is now £443 using the Bank of England calculator, wouldn’t get an omega for that now!

May be worth posing in here - 

 

But then again you can pick these up quite cheap by the looks of it (£250).

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/203550726787?hash=item2f64919a83:g:eZgAAOSwJ8Jg55Ya

Thanks for this .. I now have to buy it :whistle:

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2 hours ago, Sulie said:

Thanks for this .. I now have to buy it :whistle:

You could go cheaper and more stylish (possibly :hmmm9uh:) by transporting yourself back 42 years in time, making sure you find yourself standing outside a branch of Argos.  Pop in and fill out a slip with 250/4267 (Quantity 1...or more) and part with just £79.99 (each) for a very 1970s cushion case stainless steel Omega F300 with a sweep second hand! :yes:

That would be the equivalent of about £415 in today's money (Bank of England inflation calculator 1979 to 2020).

Sounds like alot to me just for an electronic Omega. It's not like the brand has the cachet of an Eberhard or Enicar, let alone an Longines! :laugh:

large.1227201524_ArgosCatalogueSS1979(398x426).jpg.d6e84e4215b101451381dc8eff695e5b.jpg

I wonder why Omega doesn't retail through Argos anymore - has the retailer gone just too upmarket? :hmmm9uh:

:laughing2dw:

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6 hours ago, animalone said:

Do we suppose that is just a typo, or a poor translation from Swiss German ?

I was wondering what it could be a mistranslation of, maybe it's a typo for calibers?

Talking of time travel, pop back to 1976 and get a Citizen bullhead chronograph from your mum's/wife's Empire Stores catalogue for £70.95 or £1.87 for 38 weeks.

image.png.30da7cb1ff0cf86150357d421a6edd26.pngimage.png.19615bbc5ad320753fcd539c6d760a06.png

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  • 4 weeks later...
On 29/07/2021 at 13:33, animalone said:

Indeed, it was such a well thought out design.

If anyone wants to know more about the watch, I recommend David Boettcher's article on them  

https://www.vintagewatchstraps.com/waterproof.php#Submarine

Hooke also demonstrated a sprung balance  many years before Christiaan Huygens who is normally credited with the invention (although to be fair it is the Huygens design that is closest to what we use today)

Amazing how Hookes law has been used in so many fields through the years.

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17 hours ago, spinynorman said:

This thread shouldn't be allowed to die. Here's one from The Horological Times from June 1983. I wonder how long this brand lasted.

image.png.f0cf92c2308b90a6f61c6406a34339b1.png

L&R used to make a chemical called "Solo-Lube" (seems to be discontinued now so having difficulty finding an advert to post)

 

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