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Making my first watch thread.


Daveyboyz
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More goodies accumulating today... some super thin watch batteries, triblet, dividers drill bits and a flat iron.   

I am getting closer to having the tools required.   I have a fret saw and some blades already and will now be able to actually do some of the physical tasks required.

I am probably one £500 order away from getting started.   I need 9ct gold for the lugs and a few pairs of pliers (half round, round, flat and needle) yet added some other bits and it all tots up quickly.   I keep justifying it to myself may I will take on doing some jewellery repairs in the future to pay for some of it.

What is notably absent is soldering equipment.   I have a small portable torch in the garage, flux and pickle but I might need something better.    Thankfully my friend has a microweld though it's not working so we will have to repair it.   He also has a polishing wheel though I will probably just use a dremel.

I have not sent the back for hallmark yet either... I will get onto that next week. 

Edited by Daveyboyz
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First component an internal bezel cut from a piece of copper.   I can always make the hole slightly bigger but this will be between the dial and the case.   

Having not received the movement yet I am not sure how thick this should be, possibly I will have to make a second and solder them together.

I have not got rolling mills unfortunately, that would allow me to roll material of various gauges.   I will be mostly working with materials 1mm thick, where more is required I will have to ad lib.

Also I realise working in my garage is very uncomfortable as its a standard bench (the kind you stand at)  working on small things I need to be seated.

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16 minutes ago, Daveyboyz said:

Still waiting for my movements and I need to collect my metal from hallmarking soon.

Here I perform a simple silver solder and trim my 18ct down a little.    Just talking about these elements a little.

 

Well done. I enjoyed watching your video and look forward to the next one :thumbsup:

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Here I make the 18ct white gold bezel around the glass.   Similar technique to the last.   I also double check and keep working on the front piece for the watch.

I am expecting the movements to show up tomorrow and I have a dentist drill coming soon. 

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42 minutes ago, Daveyboyz said:

 

Here I make the 18ct white gold bezel around the glass.   Similar technique to the last.   I also double check and keep working on the front piece for the watch.

I am expecting the movements to show up tomorrow and I have a dentist drill coming soon. 

Good stuff, but is there any way you can lower the volume of the tools and lift the volume of your speech, the missus thinks I'm remodelling the bathroom?

Not sure what it is like in relation to a dentist drill but I've got a dremel multi tool thingy (just checked dremel 8100 2/45) that came with loads of felt pads and various sanding discs, blades, drills, etc....

If it is of any use in this project I will happily post it over to you on indefinite loan.

If it might come in handy just message me your address and I'll drop it to the post office tomorrow.

:thumbsup:

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1 hour ago, Bricey said:

Good stuff, but is there any way you can lower the volume of the tools and lift the volume of your speech, the missus thinks I'm remodelling the bathroom?

Not sure what it is like in relation to a dentist drill but I've got a dremel multi tool thingy (just checked dremel 8100 2/45) that came with loads of felt pads and various sanding discs, blades, drills, etc....

If it is of any use in this project I will happily post it over to you on indefinite loan.

If it might come in handy just message me your address and I'll drop it to the post office tomorrow.

:thumbsup:

Yeah easy enough to lower the volume of the tools.

I have a Dremel too but unfortunately the chuck size is too big to use jewellery bits and my dremel hasn't got a foot control.

Thanks for the offer though.

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1 minute ago, Daveyboyz said:

Yeah easy enough to lower the volume of the tools.

I have a Dremel too but unfortunately the chuck size is too big to use jewellery bits and my dremel hasn't got a foot control.

Thanks for the offer though.

No worries. 

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20211016-124034.jpg

 

Yay, my movements arrived.

The actual body of the movement seems to be 1.3mm thick... so I will allow 1.5mm for it and it seems that the hands protrude no more than 2mm so now I can start to plan the cross section of the watch.

Also I have given the face of tbe watch some thought and will be making up some white gold markers at 12, 3, 6, 9.   These will be applied outside of the glass and so I won't need any printing on the dial.

Also with the movement is a thin sheet of plastic.   I presume it is to insulate the movement but have no idea whether it goes between the movement and the dial or between the movement and the case.

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5 minutes ago, Daveyboyz said:

Also I have given the face of tbe watch some thought and will be making up some white gold markers at 12, 3, 6, 9.   These will be applied outside of the glass and so I won't need any printing on the dial.

Would there not be a risk of them falling or getting knocked off and lost?

Could they not just as easily be applied to the underside of the crystal, meaning a quick buff of the glass doesn't risk removing them whilst still allowing you to avoid attaching them to the dial, or would the method of attaching them to the glass be unattractive from that view?

(Apologies for both this, and no doubt future queries I have if they are basic, obvious or just plain stupid, they are asked with zero knowledge of how such things work and so are based on nothing other than trying to understand and use logic that might well be very, very (very) flawed).

 

Edited by Bricey
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No risk of them getting knocked off.   They will be soldered into the case and will be harder than the case themselves.   18ct white is similar hardness to steel so they will likely protect the soft yellow gold if anything.

The hands should track around the dial will 1mm clearance between the end of the minute hand and the internal bezel (which I am going to have to align precisely with the window above) so batons or darts outside the bezel will make the case more decorative and give the eye some way of gauging the position of the hands.

I think this watch will be 5.7mm or 6.2mm thick...   I cannot decide at present.    The next step is to but the smallest crown possible and will dictate my decision. 

I an not entirely sure about how to anchor the movement either.   I will construct a cavity that matches it dimensions very closely, I saw it has two small holes which I thought the dial feet would go through but the appear even smaller than expected...   I will have to give it some thought.

Edited by Daveyboyz
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It looks like you are fashioning a case the way someone would designing jewelry, which is very interesting, not seen a case made that way. Roger Smith uses a gold strip and then rolls and squeezes it until it resembles a ring, soldering then like you did your case. He turns his then whereas you are molding yours I guess you would say. I can understand why someone might do it that way, it removes a lot of the waste you would get if you machined it from solid, then trying to catch and scrape up every last tiny piece of swarf - even the tiniest piece must be worth a lot.

The normal way to hold a movement is to use a movement ring, which then uses tiny screws and clamps to hold it to the inside of the case. There will probably be two threads on the movement where clamp screws hold the movement. Your problem is where to clamp the screw clamps to, as you haven't got a shoulder on the case. Some watches use a flexible plastic ring that sits inside also, but not clamped just sitting inside taking up the space.

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Given I was once a jeweller it simply seems the natural way to go about it, also given I haven't the machines to machine stuff I am just hand making.

Early watches like my 1923 Rolex have a hinged case shaped in such a way the movement simply sits inside but when the case is opened it can come away attached to the backside of the dial.   This is the sort of thing I am envisioning, I just haven't ironed out the wrinkles yet.

Edited by Daveyboyz
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2 hours ago, Daveyboyz said:

Given I was once a jeweller it simply seems the natural way to go about it, also given I haven't the machines to machine stuff I am just hand making.

Early watches like my 1923 Rolex have a hinged case shaped in such a way the movement simply sits inside but when the case is opened it can come away attached to the backside of the dial.   This is the sort of thing I am envisioning, I just haven't ironed out the wrinkles yet.

Ah, that would be why then. I also don't have any machines, I would like to get some at some point, saving up my pennies for a lathe. Your movement idea sounds solid.

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Obviously I have no technical knowledge that would be helpful regarding the manner the movement is held, but have you had a look at Hegid watches?

They are modular, their watches tend to come with the movement as a module that can slide in and out of the several different cases (you seem to get half a dozen cases and straps with each watch).

Was just thinking that whilst they may well use a traditional approach to holding the movement within the module, the manner in which the module fits in and out of the cases may give you some ideas as to how your movement will slot in an out of the case (thinking back to your sliding drawer thoughts early doors).

https://hegid.com/collections/montres

https://www.beyondthedial.com/post/hands-on-review-hegid-modular-watches/

Might be completely irrelevant, and apologies if so, but given how slim your watch is sounding it may be that the movement could be housed in a similar module design to simply slot into the watch case, without getting to a stage where it becomes too chunky?

 

Edited by Bricey
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