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Building My New Watch


Monaque
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1 hour ago, Duncan U. said:

Thanks, this is fascinating :thumbsup:

The movement is expensive, but at least that means it should be long lasting and spares should be available in the future.

Thanks. A standard SW210-1 is around £130, so adding the Premium to the standard does raise the price a lot. On the plus side, spares for Sellita movements seem to be plentiful, and easily accessable.

I'm curious about the regulation, +/- 4 secs does seem to push the movement into the Chronometer side of things.

I have found out that you can get your movements and spares straight from Sellita, so might try that.

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On 02/10/2021 at 14:49, Monaque said:

et of second hands, blued through a bed of brass swarf, or shavings, or filings, depending on what you understand. I promise the blue was much better than you c

 

On 17/10/2021 at 14:52, Monaque said:

Posting a couple of design changes/experiments.

KW15_render1.jpg

KW15_render2.jpg

KW15_render3.jpg

The bottom two are a version I'm going to make alongside the other where I have inserted a piece of Aluminium Bronze inside a piece of 316 SS, with just a about 0.7mm of SS left around the outside of the watch diameter after milling the profile. In theory. The pieces were interference fitted, meaning they were turned to provide a resistance as they were pressed together using a press. Quite a bit of pressure was exerted as one piece was pushed into the other (insert jokes here). I'll take a photo of the blank soon. I was hoping to have started the turning on the CNC lathe but it broke down so have had to wait.

 

 

Oh, the first photo above was an experiment with a radius instead of an angle on the inside near the dial face.

Love this design

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On 05/11/2021 at 05:07, johnny Cool said:

WoW, that is very impressive and I am totally obsessed with your work! 

@johnny Cool Thank you, very kind.

2 hours ago, caliberworks said:

 

Love this design

@caliberworks Thanks, that is the design I am making. Really looking forward to the journey, lots of cool stuff to discover and make.

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So, making tracks to try out the waterslide decals I bought recently. To that end I turned up some new dials, most of them around 0.45 to 0.55 thick. They won't be used for anything other than the decal experiment so not that important. What I do know is that the paint I apply (grey etching primer - 2 coats - and the matt white top coat - 4 layers in total) will add to the overall thickness. I can't remember from last time how much so I'll check that out with these.

I turned up a wooden fixture made from Macassar Ebony, to hold the dials as I turn them. I will be making a new version of this in Aluminium once I know what happens to the decals.

 

KW15_Making14.jpg

KW15_Making15.jpg

The fixture holds the thin dial by a recess inside the bore. I bored the recess with a high speed tool that had an angle inside which then transferred its angle into the bore, effectively making the recess a sharp angle. The principle being that the angle would naturally turn inwards when is applied to the outside by the screw. At the sizes and lengths we're using here I don't think it actually does that much to help keep the dial locked in the recess but you never know. At the very least it keeps the back side of the dial from fouling on the back of the recess and stopping it from being pushed out as pressure is applied. I found this really worked well as long as you aren't too aggressive with the size of the cuts. I know people use glue a lot of time to hold thin and delicate parts but my experience in manufacturing has me thinking about fixtures more and it works for me.

I also wanted to post a very short video of the turning tool turning the dial in the lathe chuck but I couldn't get it to work after I uploaded it. I'm not too familiar with video at the moment, something new for me. Branching out a little as video does show a bit more about the process people go through when creating things. I have to get used to video formats and compression and sizes.

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8 minutes ago, Monaque said:

So, making tracks to try out the waterslide decals I bought recently. To that end I turned up some new dials, most of them around 0.45 to 0.55 thick. They won't be used for anything other than the decal experiment so not that important. What I do know is that the paint I apply (grey etching primer - 2 coats - and the matt white top coat - 4 layers in total) will add to the overall thickness. I can't remember from last time how much so I'll check that out with these.

I turned up a wooden fixture made from Macassar Ebony, to hold the dials as I turn them. I will be making a new version of this in Aluminium once I know what happens to the decals.

 

KW15_Making14.jpg

KW15_Making15.jpg

The fixture holds the thin dial by a recess inside the bore. I bored the recess with a high speed tool that had an angle inside which then transferred its angle into the bore, effectively making the recess a sharp angle. The principle being that the angle would naturally turn inwards when is applied to the outside by the screw. At the sizes and lengths we're using here I don't think it actually does that much to help keep the dial locked in the recess but you never know. At the very least it keeps the back side of the dial from fouling on the back of the recess and stopping it from being pushed out as pressure is applied. I found this really worked well as long as you aren't too aggressive with the size of the cuts. I know people use glue a lot of time to hold thin and delicate parts but my experience in manufacturing has me thinking about fixtures more and it works for me.

I also wanted to post a very short video of the turning tool turning the dial in the lathe chuck but I couldn't get it to work after I uploaded it. I'm not too familiar with video at the moment, something new for me. Branching out a little as video does show a bit more about the process people go through when creating things. I have to get used to video formats and compression and sizes.

I used the same sort of thing to create a double headed 10p. It took me hours to get it right, gave it to my mate and he spent it by mistake!

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  • 2 weeks later...

I'm sorry I've been a bit lax on my thread. Unfortunately any work I do at my place of work is subject to availability of the machines, and we've been busy lately. Also we have have a few problems, the main one being that our compressor failed and my boss has had to organize a new one while we manage in the meantime.

Also, I decided to 3d print some parts so I could build myself a pad printer, well, part of a pad printer anyway. Then, my printer decided to malfunction and it's now in pieces being rebuilt.

So, I'm working towards my watch at the moment but getting nowhere near.

The one thing I have decided, after the experiment with machining the dial feet on the back of a dial, is that I'm going to make my dials like that from now on. I have to make new fixtures to cope with that. I think in the end it will be better though.

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