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Watch regulating apps


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OK I know there's no substitute for the proper equipment but today just for a bit of fun I tried to 5 of my watches on one of these apps. 

I did the test on each one in three positions and worked out an average. 

According to this app, my worst are my two quite new Seiko 5's which are a whole minute out. 

In third place is my Vostok Red Sea at - 25.

Second place my Omega Speedmaster Pro at +15 

Best is my Vostok Komenderskie at +6

 

I can't quite believe that but that's what it said. 

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Sounds like you got a good Komandirskie :thumbs_up:

I have Watch Accuracy meter on Android and tested it against a timegrapher program on my pc and the results were the same, so I was very impressed with the app.

Coincidentally, I have just be adjusting the Vostok Amphibia I just built up wi the app. After some trial error, I got the beat error down from 0.8 to 0.2 and the face up rate from +18 to 0, but as it has been gaining 25s a day, I expect roughly +7 seconds which is good enough for me.

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The Watch Accuracy Meter android app is really quite effective and accurate, although it doesn't show amplitude.  In my experience Seikos are far from accurate out of the box, which is one reason why I don't own any anymore :laugh:

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1 hour ago, RTM Boy said:

The Watch Accuracy Meter android app is really quite effective and accurate, although it doesn't show amplitude.  In my experience Seikos are far from accurate out of the box, which is one reason why I don't own any anymore :laugh:

Regulating your own watch can be fun if it was under £100, but at the current Seiko prices it shouldn't be necessary. It's also not unreasonable to have the bezel and dial aligned, but that's another story!

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21 hours ago, bikerbill said:

Vostok Komenderskie

My hand wound Vostok was bang on, most accurate watch I had, apart from a well regulated and adjusted top grade 2824-2.  My Ball Chronometer may be as good, but I sold the Vostok a while back so can't compare - the Ball is based on a 2824-2 also.

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22 hours ago, RTM Boy said:

The Watch Accuracy Meter android app is really quite effective and accurate, although it doesn't show amplitude.  In my experience Seikos are far from accurate out of the box, which is one reason why I don't own any anymore :laugh:

 

Well now I'm not so sure I was getting a real world reading. 

Since doing this I wore my worst performing Seiko, which is a brand new one I got in H Samuel's in their sale for half price. 

I synced it with the speaking clock and so far it's running at +6 seconds a day (24 hours) 

So I don't understand that at all. 

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11 minutes ago, bikerbill said:

 

Well now I'm not so sure I was getting a real world reading. 

Since doing this I wore my worst performing Seiko, which is a brand new one I got in H Samuel's in their sale for half price. 

I synced it with the speaking clock and so far it's running at +6 seconds a day (24 hours) 

So I don't understand that at all. 

Sometimes it be like that, I think some watches are shy and freeze up like a 16 year old sitting a gcse exam, but work just fine when there is no pressure to perform and they and broadly ignored to just get on with things.

An odd one is my Tudor when on the timegrapher scores crack on or within 1 or 2 seconds per day, each and every way up.

If I wear it for a prolonged period (it's rare but I occasionally do / have done) it again seems to tick along happily never missing a beat.

But if I put it on the winder it seems to lose about 1-2 minutes per week (which doesn't really bother me now I regularly switch everyday, I just set it straight when I put it on and accept that it is easier to shift it forward a minute or so each wear than leave it to run down and then mess about with day, date and time each time it gets the nod for the day.

For me, losing more than a minute or two per day makes a watch a bit of a problem (or more serious faults like randomly stopping or the date not turning over properly), anything inside that spec is fine given I'm generally wearing it for about 12 hours then tucking it away in the winder again.

 

Edited by Bricey
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I ran a selection of my watches last night on the Android app. Then I exported the results and tabulated them in a spreadsheet (okay, I missed my calling as an accountant :laughing2dw:). The app tracks rate, but also beat error, and I wondered how to allow for that. I read that beat error should be under 0.6, so anything higher than that got the absolute value of rate multiplied by 100 to push it down the table. This is what came to the top of the list (FH = dial down, CH = dial up).

image.png.0a96e8a693fcf5f1d00d7c6a70fc33c9.png

No correllation with whether it's been serviced recently or not, or the quality of the brand - Omega, Longines Admiral, Bucherer 2824 chronometer, older Rolex Precision, didn't make the cut. 

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Maybe its best to not to get too bogged down with this but it's not easy. 

I spent some time adjusting my new Vostok red sea which was running insanely fast (on the wrist) at +40 a day. 

As I write I'm about 3 hours away from my 24 hour check but so far it's at +2 per day. 

It's all quite exciting :laugh:

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@bikerbill there are so many factors impacting mechanical watches eg;

  • Always make sure the watch is fully wound when testing.  Watches can become very wayward when wound down, but still running.
  • If brand new or just serviced, there's a good chance they'll need to bed in, so need wearing, preferably continuously, for at least a couple of weeks.
  • If you've bought online all manner of shocks will have befallen the watch before arriving at your front door, no matter how well packaged.
  • If sat still for, say, 6 months, the same applies.  It's a bit like leaving a car standard for ages - not a good idea - they need to be used.
  • Temperature and relative dampness in storage can cause funny running too (yes, even with 300m WR).
  • Even a slight knock, eg clatting a desk, can cause a usually temporary timing shift.
  • Which way up the watch is matters alot.  Watches on their sides almost always have lower amplitude and usually lose a bit of time.
  • Age is another factor of course.  Components wear, lubricants become less effective.
  • And magnetism in our world of devices...
  • An over-lubricated watch (ahem Seiko :whistle:) is very bad for good running.
  • The list goes on...
  • Watch winders seem to have a weird impact on timekeeping.  I never use them (I don't have one).  I'm convinced they cause wear too.

Even then, you can buy a watch and it runs spot on from the start, with no issues, great rate, no beat error, high amplitude, always good, even after not wearing for months at a time!

But contrary to what millennials believe, however funky they are, apps are not the solution to everything.  There's still no substitute for a proper timegrapher.

 

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