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Bremont - could this be their new movement?


Caller.
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Bremont have been promising an in house movement for years. It's a tough thing to achieve, a huge amount of work involved and the cost is enormous. I know they have partnered with a Swiss company before who developed a movement for them, which led to some confusion about who exactly was doing what to said movement. Not the first time their PR department has been a bit creative when it comes to describing their watches, in the past anyway.

It would be nice to see them do it, after all this time.

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@Monaque Last October was the last mentioned date, but that was before The Wing and everything got put back by Covid. Judging by recent comments from the brothers, I would be surprised if this is it, but we will find out soon enough. Being honest, if it was a new movement, I would have expected a grander presentation. 

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3 hours ago, Caller. said:

@Monaque Last October was the last mentioned date, but that was before The Wing and everything got put back by Covid. Judging by recent comments from the brothers, I would be surprised if this is it, but we will find out soon enough. Being honest, if it was a new movement, I would have expected a grander presentation. 

Yeah, me too, they tend towards the theatric in their PR. If they had created their own in house movement we would certainly hear about it.

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I have never understood what the big deal in having an in house movement is, baffling. 

Seiko are very good at it. So good in fact, they sell theirs by the truck load, and other manufacturers/assemblers boast the fact that their creation contains a "Seiko movement". 

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2 hours ago, WRENCH said:

I have never understood what the big deal in having an in house movement is, baffling. 

Seiko are very good at it. So good in fact, they sell theirs by the truck load, and other manufacturers/assemblers boast the fact that their creation contains a "Seiko movement". 

Yes and no. 

Im perfectly happy for the likes of Longines, Breitling to use ETA movements if it means more money is spent on the case, straps, clasps and finishing quality. 

When you get to the level of Omega etc then an inhouse or at least modified movement is a must. 

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For the prices now being charged by  Bremont I think it’s essential that they develop their own in house movements. These are nog cheap watches and if you want to live with the best you have to have something unique within your identity. Initially Bremont didn’t impress me but I am slowly changing my mind and have thought about putting one on my shopping list. If they developed their own movement that would tick the box for me and after all they are a BRITISH watchmaker. clap2.gif.f920286d23e712d1b4ddaf64c11d231d.gif

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1 hour ago, WRENCH said:

Why ?

I think it would be very hard to sell watches above say £5000 with a movement bought in for a few hundred pounds, because people would look at it and wonder why not buy other cheaper watches with exactly the same movement? As a ridiculous example, would Patek get away with charging £25000 for a watch with a standard Sellita 200 inside? Actually, maybe they could :laugh:

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3 hours ago, WRENCH said:

Why ?

because when im paying £5000 for something, i personally want more than an ETA base movement. Personally speaking i want to pay for craftsmanship and engineering, innovation etc. 

Just personal choice though and its what draws me to brands like Omega and JLC. 

Same for Quartz watches, i love Grand Seiko because for your £2500 youre getting a quality 9F movement, over £1500 for a TAG with a £20 disposible movement. 

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53 minutes ago, WRENCH said:

Even if it had a modified eta 2824 movement ?

Which brings us back to what WickerBill said earlier. A good quality movement, dismantled, modified/improved and decorated by Patek is no longer an off the shelf movement and most people would consider it more suited to an expensive watch.

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1 hour ago, Duncan U. said:

The buyer would have to be a total Muppet though :rolleyes:

I gather my Franck Muller conquistador has an eta movement (embellished with a platinum rotor?)

I love the watch and it keeps good time. Its 14ct white gold and believe it or not the new leather strap was infused with vanilla. A tad expensive at £500ish and my only regret is that the smell has faded over the years.

Best wishes @muppet.com

510751899_20210517_1539322.thumb.jpg.d4f90a6e20e31c447acd19d489be04e2.jpg

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7 hours ago, WRENCH said:

I have never understood what the big deal in having an in house movement is, baffling. 

Seiko are very good at it. So good in fact, they sell theirs by the truck load, and other manufacturers/assemblers boast the fact that their creation contains a "Seiko movement". 

Doesn't it show a certain level of skill, after all Geoge Daniels himself said that you couldn't call yourself a watchmaker if you hadn't made a complete watch and mastered all, how many skills in doing so? So, for a watchmaking company it shows they are a serious player in that they have spent time and effort in developing something that complex.

A lot of people have made watches and aren't watchmakers, myself included, but if you've made a watch complete...

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I am always surprised that people mainly consider the cost of the movement, when assessing the cost / value of a watch. Whether it be Bremont, Schofield or whoever. What about the rest of it? If a watch consisted of a generic bought in case, hands and all the rest of it, so be it. But when there are unique design features involved throughout, such as a bespoke case, shock proof systems and so on, artistic unique case backs, then the cost will increase. And that's what you get with both Bremont and Schofield. The value / cost of the watch is the totality of what you are buying, not just the movement.

Edited by Caller.
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32 minutes ago, Monaque said:

Doesn't it show a certain level of skill, after all Geoge Daniels himself said that you couldn't call yourself a watchmaker if you hadn't made a complete watch and mastered all, how many skills in doing so? So, for a watchmaking company it shows they are a serious player in that they have spent time and effort in developing something that complex.

A lot of people have made watches and aren't watchmakers, myself included, but if you've made a watch complete...

Fun Fact:clap: The George Daniels Millennium wristwatches use a modified Omega 2500 movement (itself a version of the ETA2892) 

 

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