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Bremont - could this be their new movement?


Caller.
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5 hours ago, WickerBill said:

In some respects thats what Bremont has here. 

To my eyes there are 3 levels of movements in the watch world:

Bought in Movements - So movements like ETA, Selitta, Miyota etc, where they are bought from a manufacture and thrown into the case

Manufacture Movements - A movement designed and manufactured for a company, then hand assembled or modified by that company. Examples include Tudor and Breitling who pay Kennissi to produce the B01 movements. Its a half way house between bought in and in house. This is becoming more common with the desire to have in house movements, but basically produces the same result at a smaller price for the companies involved. 

Fully In House Movements - Fully designed, manufactured and assembled movements in house.

 

To me what Bremont have done here, is very much what Rolex used to do, and what Breitling/ Tudor do now. They have found a movement, bought the IP, so they now own the movement and then manufacture it inside their facility. 

There's another level, in regards to movements anyway, those that buy in movements only to adjust them to suit their needs. I think this is another area that has been exploited a lot, and which has also led to Bremont making some PR mistakes in the past.

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11 hours ago, Bricey said:

Agree but would argue (not aggressively) that these are three types or routes to a movement rather than levels.

Each of these three types then has levels within it.

The bought in movements obviously have very different levels, a cheapo budget movement up to a high end lauded movement. But then even there there are levels of execution, a basic movement that is then heavily decorated and regulated might end up more desirable than a much higher spec movement literally (to quote your post) thrown into a case.

Same with the levels within the modified movements, there is a wide scope it seems for just how modified they may be.

The fully in-house movements are generally the reserve of high end brands, and so I expect that a certain level of expected quality exists, but I would still be surprised if there wasn't quite a spectrum between the most highly regarded and the most poorly received.

 

I agree with you Sir. Modified movements can be very attractive  --  in fact, more so than some in-house clockwork.

This photo of part of my collection . . . . .

NkBwTPI.jpg

 . . . . shows the bog standard ETA 2824 (top right) "just thrown in" to my Stowa Flieger and the bog standard Unitas 6498 "just thrown in" to my MeisterSinger 02  --  though, it has to be admitted that the 6498 is not bad looking in its own right.

The other two shown are both based upon the 6498 architecture  --  as can be seen on close examination  --  but are IMHO at least as attractive as many in-house offerings. Dirk Dornblüth's effort (top left) is so completely re-engineered that it is difficult to imagine that many parts are used as delivered. And (at bottom right) Jochen Benzinger's modifications (skeletisation, guilloche, and other decoration entirely by hand  --  and therefore unique) is something to behold.,

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34 minutes ago, yokel said:

I agree with you Sir. Modified movements can be very attractive  --  in fact, more so than some in-house clockwork.

This photo of part of my collection . . . . .

NkBwTPI.jpg

 . . . . shows the bog standard ETA 2824 (top right) "just thrown in" to my Stowa Flieger and the bog standard Unitas 6498 "just thrown in" to my MeisterSinger 02  --  though, it has to be admitted that the 6498 is not bad looking in its own right.

The other two shown are both based upon the 6498 architecture  --  as can be seen on close examination  --  but are IMHO at least as attractive as many in-house offerings. Dirk Dornblüth's effort (top left) is so completely re-engineered that it is difficult to imagine that many parts are used as delivered. And (at bottom right) Jochen Benzinger's modifications (skeletisation, guilloche, and other decoration entirely by hand  --  and therefore unique) is something to behold.,

You have some very nice watches, and I agree, there are a lot of watch manufacturers making very attractive watches with modified movements. There's a lot you can do with a movement to make it more of your own, makes sense from a cost perspective.

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