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Third world engineering.


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11 minutes ago, WRENCH said:

Especially for @BondandBigM and @Alpha550t

Looks like this is his speciality.

A friend had a final drive bev€l gear for a veteran car manufactured in Pakistan, when no one here was interested, and it has served its purpose perfectly.

We have a couple gear cutters near us that will do anything as long as they have the sample.  

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18 minutes ago, WRENCH said:

Will they repair/manufacture to sample ?

Of course. We use them for gears that fail in our machines (old lathes, horizontal borers etc ). D. E. Ward they're called, near Newcastle.  They did a triplex chain sprocket for one of our customers just before Christmas. I turned the blank (about 500mm dia) and they cut the teeth. 

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51 minutes ago, Alpha550t said:

Of course. We use them for gears that fail in our machines (old lathes, horizontal borers etc ). D. E. Ward they're called, near Newcastle.  They did a triplex chain sprocket for one of our customers just before Christmas. I turned the blank (about 500mm dia) and they cut the teeth. 

Thank you, appreciated. :thumbsup:

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On 08/01/2022 at 17:23, WRENCH said:

Especially for @BondandBigM and @Alpha550t

Looks like this is his speciality.

A friend had a final drive bev€l gear for a veteran car manufactured in Pakistan, when no one here was interested, and it has served its purpose perfectly.

Absolute pleasure to watch :thumbsup:

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My dear @WRENCH, thanks so much for putting that video on the Forum.Indeed, I am just taking a break to write this before going back to the video to watch the remaining half. I love the dexterity and combination of manual skill and machinery, and that lathe is something else. I want one in my garage, just to gawp at.:laugh:

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2 hours ago, Always"watching" said:

My dear @WRENCH, thanks so much for putting that video on the Forum.Indeed, I am just taking a break to write this before going back to the video to watch the remaining half. I love the dexterity and combination of manual skill and machinery, and that lathe is something else. I want one in my garage, just to gawp at.:laugh:

It's getting harder and harder to get decent centre lathe turners, we've had a few over the years that say they can do it but get found out pretty quick!

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On 10/01/2022 at 15:46, Always"watching" said:

My dear @WRENCH, thanks so much for putting that video on the Forum.Indeed, I am just taking a break to write this before going back to the video to watch the remaining half. I love the dexterity and combination of manual skill and machinery, and that lathe is something else. I want one in my garage, just to gawp at.:laugh:

Possibly but watching that makes me cringe, he is lucky his hands and forearms are still attached to his elbows

:laughing2dw: :laughing2dw:

On 10/01/2022 at 18:48, Alpha550t said:

It's getting harder and harder to get decent centre lathe turners, we've had a few over the years that say they can do it but get found out pretty quick!

 I can make square things out of not square things as well

IMG-20211222-153751.jpg

I can start on Monday

:biggrin:

 

 

 

Edited by BondandBigM
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20 minutes ago, WRENCH said:

Here's a novel way of firing up a stationary engine.

 

Bare Feet, Flip Flops and flipping a big heavy lump of stone over. 

:wacko:

:laughing2dw: :laughing2dw:

Out in the Middle East on the periphery of the bigger industrial estates there were loads of these small places that would, one way or another, fix anything. I hate to think what the death in service rate was among the immigrant population.

 

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6 minutes ago, BondandBigM said:

Bare Feet, Flip Flops and flipping a big heavy lump of stone over. 

:wacko:

:laughing2dw: :laughing2dw:

Out in the Middle East on the periphery of the bigger industrial estates there were loads of these small places that would, one way or another, fix anything. I hate to think what the death in service rate was among the immigrant population.

 

I used to buy scrap industrial engines that were beyond economical repair and take them by the truck load to Cambridge and sell them for export, mainly to Pakistan. The guys were all very decent. It didn't seem to matter how bad they were, they'd fix them. Fuel pumps and injectors too.

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This thread reminds me of the vehicles in India that have a ladder frame chassis and the engine is a based off single cylinder water pump. I think they are called Jugaad (roughly translated kindly as "an economical fix"). IIRC These came about when the government gave grants to buy the pumps and also cut tax on vehicles for farm work but some inventive person decided it was a good way to get around the rules, now they are everywhere. I think some of the earlier ones has Land Rover or Jeep chassis which were in surplus at the time.

https://drivetribe.com/p/jugaad-2021-3-lakh-real-life-review-Ixq1XlcqT9KwNeh_LXRhZA?iid=LNARPVAFQqCUywaRLG-qCg

https://www.team-bhp.com/forum/commercial-vehicles/117066-jugaad.html

"Necessity is the mother of invention" - Plato

41145043032_5509591739_z.jpg

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39 minutes ago, Ugg10 said:

This thread reminds me of the vehicles in India that have a ladder frame chassis and the engine is a based off single cylinder water pump. I think they are called Jugaad (roughly translated kindly as "an economical fix"). IIRC These came about when the government gave grants to buy the pumps and also cut tax on vehicles for farm work but some inventive person decided it was a good way to get around the rules, now they are everywhere. I think some of the earlier ones has Land Rover or Jeep chassis which were in surplus at the time.

https://drivetribe.com/p/jugaad-2021-3-lakh-real-life-review-Ixq1XlcqT9KwNeh_LXRhZA?iid=LNARPVAFQqCUywaRLG-qCg

https://www.team-bhp.com/forum/commercial-vehicles/117066-jugaad.html

"Necessity is the mother of invention" - Plato

41145043032_5509591739_z.jpg

Its not that long ago these things were built and used in the UK.

Im20110618BC-Lis-i369.jpg

Martin-Bonser-3-wheel-truck.jpg

Usually powered by either Lister/Petter single cylinder diesels or a multitude of different brand petrol power units. They were fully road legal for "agricultural use", dangerously slow, had no suspension whatsoever, but were extremely robust, reliable and very simple and easy to repair. To a great extent they have been replaced by this sort of thing.

5243190-polaris-ranger.jpg

Which by comparison are overly complex, and expensive to buy and maintain.

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Here's another from these shores. (Leeds)

Where the guy cranks the engine over at the beginning does two things, primes the engine with fuel, but also makes you aware of the fact as to whether or not the tractor is in gear, which given the starting method, could be disastrous. I've done this many times, some of these old tractors were still being used in the 1980's. 

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23 hours ago, WRENCH said:

Here's another from these shores. (Leeds)

Where the guy cranks the engine over at the beginning does two things, primes the engine with fuel, but also makes you aware of the fact as to whether or not the tractor is in gear, which given the starting method, could be disastrous. I've done this many times, some of these old tractors were still being used in the 1980's. 

Loved that, most excellent!

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On 13/01/2022 at 13:17, WRENCH said:

Here's another from these shores. (Leeds)

Where the guy cranks the engine over at the beginning does two things, primes the engine with fuel, but also makes you aware of the fact as to whether or not the tractor is in gear, which given the starting method, could be disastrous. I've done this many times, some of these old tractors were still being used in the 1980's. 

Didn’t some of the early Spitfire Merlin engines start that way with a shot gun cartridge, or is my memory playing tricks?

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Back in the day I ended up out in the Gulf on an old gas rig, we were working on the flare stack on a 48 hour shut down. 

After the job when it was time to re-light our boat pulled away a fair distance and I assumed there would be some sort of automatic ignition system but no such thing unfortunately two "volunteers" two Indian blokes were packed off over the side in a small inflatable with what looked like an old blunderbuss, some magnesium cartridges and a walkie-talkie and sent forth

:huh:

It took them a few goes to get up the bottle to get close enough. Alright in the middle of the Persian Gulf apparently the normal way of firing the flare stack up, life was cheap so plenty others in reserve if the first pair got toasted. 

Not so much in the North Sea, the authorities took a dim view 

https://www.energyvoice.com/oilandgas/north-sea/160370/total-confirms-checks-elgin-platform-firearms-licensing-matter/

:laughing2dw: :laughing2dw:

 

Edited by BondandBigM
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9 hours ago, BondandBigM said:

Back in the day I ended up out in the Gulf on an old gas rig, we were working on the flare stack on a 48 hour shut down. 

After the job when it was time to re-light our boat pulled away a fair distance and I assumed there would be some sort of automatic ignition system but no such thing unfortunately two "volunteers" two Indian blokes were packed off over the side in a small inflatable with what looked like an old blunderbuss, some magnesium cartridges and a walkie-talkie and sent forth

:huh:

It took them a few goes to get up the bottle to get close enough. Alright in the middle of the Persian Gulf apparently the normal way of firing the flare stack up, life was cheap so plenty others in reserve if the first pair got toasted. 

Not so much in the North Sea, the authorities took a dim view 

https://www.energyvoice.com/oilandgas/north-sea/160370/total-confirms-checks-elgin-platform-firearms-licensing-matter/

:laughing2dw: :laughing2dw:

 

And I thought drillers I worked with here were dodgy!

 

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