Jump to content
  • Sign Up to reply and join the friendliest Watch Forum on the web. Stick around, get to 50 posts and gain access to your full profile and additional features such as a personal messaging system, chat room and the sales forum PLUS the chance to enter our regular giveaways.
Smart Stig

Stem Removal On Omega 1342 Quartz?

Recommended Posts

Picked up a couple of reasonable Omegas at the weekend - an 1966 Seamaster auto and a 1979 Quartz (Model 196.0160, calibre 1342).

Both are in need of some TLC - the auto is a runner, but a bit scruffy (posts elsewhere for that shortly...); the quartz is a bit cosmetically dirty and is in need of a new battery contact that has been broken off. Knew that electronics HNC would come in useful one day!

So I can clean the dirt flecks from the inside of the crystal and the dial on the quartz, does anyone know how the stem button comes out to release the movement from the case? Can't see any obvious release screws or magic buttons in the movement and I don't want to guess given that it has the adjustment button in the stem centre. I already took the leap of faith with the split stem on the auto (feels so wrong to pull that hard on a stem!), but this I suspect requires some different fettling technique.

DSCF3666.jpg

DSCF3665.jpg

Oh, and I am definitely replacing the blue lizard strap!

Andrew

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm pretty sure you must remove the electronic module first.

Which leads to the obvious question - how does that come out! :wink2:

For now I've polished the hesalite on the outside which has made it look a lot better - but there are two really annoying flecks of dirt inside though that I really want to get to...

In the mean time I've repaired the battery contact - the lower spring had been broken off where the plate attached to the circuit board.

DSCF3672.jpg

So I've made up a small semi-insulated spring to sit in the bottom and connect to the board...

DSCF3673.jpg

And with a spot of micro soldering...

DSCF3674.jpg

Hooked it up to a temporary 1.5v source (can't find a 329 at the moment) and it ticks along nicely. Result.

Andrew

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

HNC? That's BA quality work! You may need to hold the stem and unscrew the crown from it before removing the movement along with the crownless stem. (That's just a suggestion by the way - I'm guessing)

Mike

Edited by tixntox

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm pretty sure you must remove the electronic module first.

Which leads to the obvious question - how does that come out! :wink2:

By removing the screws :wink2:

I can see 3 or 4 screws holding the module:

Omega1342.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm pretty sure you must remove the electronic module first.

Which leads to the obvious question - how does that come out! :wink2:

By removing the screws :wink2:

I can see 3 or 4 screws holding the module:

Omega1342.jpg

Top left one is just holding the battery clip, the others, not sure. Anyway, for the moment I'm having trouble getting the lock ring (the grey plastic ring around the movement) loose - the two screws holding the ring by little metal tangs (the slots at 10 and 4 o'clock from the back) are proving to be an odd size - wide but very fine and shallow. I don't want to risk damaging them so will probably need to recut a screwdriver to fit them specifically.

Andrew

Edited by Smart Stig

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lock ring is now released (one previously damaged precision screwdriver now ground to a fine knife edge released the screws easily), but the stem is apparently threaded through it still. The three screws identified by ketiljo do release the circuit board, but still not much hint on how the stem releases. Anyone think that the red plastic button thing is tempting?

DSCF3684.jpg

Andrew

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Anyone think that the red plastic button thing is tempting?

Answered my own question! Found a hit on google for using the red button to reinsert the stem, so brave pill taken, apply pressure to red button and firm pressure to stem and voila! And it can be done without removing the circuit board.

Andrew

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

New battery arrived from the 'Bay this morning, along with some bits (new spring bars to replace the horribly corroded ones - thought I might have to hacksaw one of them it was so encrusted!) from our benevolent host, to nicely finish off my resurrection of this pleasant little quartz...

DSCF3687.jpg

Half day in and it is still dead on time against my other two quartzies.

The NATO is temporary until the leather strap arrives, and while I'm still fettling it - I keep spotting flecks of dust and remnants of oxidised lume on the dial under different lights.

The next project is the Seamaster with the loose (or worn out - will find out on dismantling it) rotor axle, and then the two latest finders...

Andrew

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just picked up a Seamaster from 1977 with the 1342 movement myself so wanted to say thanks for the stem removal tutorial. No specs to speak of really but it might come in handy at some point.

Here is a picture of mine, it's the 18K version with reference 196.0102, yours must be 196.0106 ?

image70692.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice shot Webvan, and it looks like its got an original Omega crystal as well - I think you can just about see the omega logo a fraction above the hands.

Edited by Big Bad Boris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good catch, I didn notice that with my loupe last night, here's a close-up below. The top part is a tad "worn", possibly due to the use of Polywatch, the logo is on top of the crystal I take it?

1342_18k.JPG.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good catch, I didn notice that with my loupe last night, here's a close-up below. The top part is a tad "worn", possibly due to the use of Polywatch, the logo is on top of the crystal I take it?

I think it is, but one of the Omega guys will confirm it one way or another.

I was polishing the crystal on my bootfair find Omega a couple of weeks ago when an alarm bell went off in my brain as I suddenly remembered a posting about the subtle little Omega crystal logo. I stopped polishing immediately, and checked the crystal, the logo was still there, so no damage done :)

Edited by Big Bad Boris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...