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Seiko Movements - Educate Me?


martinwilly
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I own an Omega Seamaster Aqua-terra. The co-axial one.

I'm utterly fed up with it as it has broken down more times than is funny.

It was replaced by Omega 6 months ago and was remarkably accurate until it stopped last week. When it comes back from the usual 3 months at Omega, it's going on ebay. I'm cutting my losses.

And I'd like a Seiko because I'm belatedly sussed that they are wonderful.

Would any of you educate me about the various omega movements? I want to spend a lot less money than the omega. Absolute maximum £600 but would much prefer to spend £250.

Is the movement in the sports 5 watches comparable with the movement in the Aqua-terra? Apart from the George Daniels bit. Or is that an idiot thing to say? It's a tenth of the price, after all. But I wouldn't be surprised.

Is there a Seiko movement I should aim for? A benchmark? A well-respected, well-tried movement?

Are there naff Seiko movements?

Do I need to spend more than £250?

I'd buy a kinetic but I can't find one that's simple but has saphire glass, date, 100m water-resistance and no bezel.

If there are some Seiko officionados on here who can help, that'd be great. I'm on the brink of buying a SNZG05J1 or similar.

Would that be a mistake? Is there a far better movement?

Thank you.

Martin

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I have several 7S26 powered Seikos which keep excellent time and feel just as good on the wrist as my Omega's. I have, in the past, run Seikos for years (one over ten) without touching them at all and they just kept on running. I have a couple of Seiko kinetics which are spot on after their capacitor (problems!!!) to battery swaps. My Seiko 7A38 (quartz) is accurate between battery changes. All in all they are excellent.

Mike

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I own an Omega Seamaster Aqua-terra. The co-axial one.

I'm utterly fed up with it as it has broken down more times than is funny.

It was replaced by Omega 6 months ago and was remarkably accurate until it stopped last week. When it comes back from the usual 3 months at Omega, it's going on ebay. I'm cutting my losses.

And I'd like a Seiko because I'm belatedly sussed that they are wonderful.

Would any of you educate me about the various omega movements? I want to spend a lot less money than the omega. Absolute maximum £600 but would much prefer to spend £250.

Is the movement in the sports 5 watches comparable with the movement in the Aqua-terra? Apart from the George Daniels bit. Or is that an idiot thing to say? It's a tenth of the price, after all. But I wouldn't be surprised.

Is there a Seiko movement I should aim for? A benchmark? A well-respected, well-tried movement?

Are there naff Seiko movements?

Do I need to spend more than £250?

I'd buy a kinetic but I can't find one that's simple but has saphire glass, date, 100m water-resistance and no bezel.

If there are some Seiko officionados on here who can help, that'd be great. I'm on the brink of buying a SNZG05J1 or similar.

Would that be a mistake? Is there a far better movement?

Thank you.

Martin

I have just purchased a Kinectic Divers watch for under £200.

It is a great watch looks and feels much more expensive it feels it will last for years.Some very keen deals on internet from authorised Seiko dealers.

I have owned Omegas and this seems as well built and solid

Hope this helps

Howard

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Hello Friends:

This is a nice thread topic. I too have Swiss ETAs, Citizen Miyotas, Orient Cals, and Seiko 4207, 7S26 A&B. 36 A&B.

All great movements. But truly, I am always astounded by my Asian movements. I care mainly for longevity. Yes, performance is important to me, but knowing that a mechanical watch can never really be as accurate a quartz, I don't focus on accuracy. Would you believe me that my first Seiko S-Wave, a 1999, 7S26A-powered watch, has just celebrated its 11-year birthday? My others are 13 years old. Do you all realize how good that is? 11 years old and 13 yeard old...have been running all these years, and have never been opened and/or serviced.

This information (in the article link below) is quite basic to watch collectors, but my watches have corroborated their findings and conclusions:

http://www.thepurist...res/8ohms/7s26/

All my best,

Angelis

Edited by Angelis
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Hello Friends:

This is a nice thread topic. I too have Swiss ETAs, Citizen Miyotas, Orient Cals, and Seiko 4207, 7S26 A&B. 36 A&B.

All great movements. But truly, I am always astounded by my Asian movements. I care mainly for longevity. Yes, performance is important to me, but knowing that a mechanical watch can never really be as accurate a quartz, I don't focus on accuracy. Would you believe me that my first Seiko S-Wave, a 1999, 7S26A-powered watch, has just celebrated its 11-year birthday? My others are 13 years old. Do you all realize how good that is? 11 years old and 13 yeard old...have been running all these years, and have never been opened and/or serviced.

This information (in the article link below) is quite basic to watch collectors, but my watches have corroborated their findings and conclusions:

http://www.thepurist...res/8ohms/7s26/

All my best,

Angelis

An excellent reference piece.

Mike

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I've got a few Seikos, all of which I love. I have a 2005 "Silver Knight" with a 7S26 movement in it, that is solid, quite accurate (out of the box, never been serviced), hard as nails. I believe the Seiko 5 line is based on the 7S26 or its successor, many many styles to choose from.

I presume you're after an auto, but if you're willing to wear a quartz.... I have a 7A48 (Seiko introduced the first analog quartz chrono, IIRC, in the 7A38, then added a moonphase complication in the 7A48), thing of beauty and accurate as hell. 7T32s are a recent vintage (1990s) movement that incorporates an alarm dial which, when the alarm is switched off, serves perfectly as a second time zone display.

I've just bit the Orient hook, and have a CEV09 that is both retro, stylish (looks like much more $ than I actually paid), keeping superbly accurate time. I have another on order for a Christmas present to myself, a limited edition Orient STI model developed for the STI racing team.

If you're not set on Japanese makes, consider an Ollech & Wajs with Swiss movement (I have two and love them), or a Steinhart (also using ETA movements), or as I think someone has suggested, Oris (don't own but have read many positive anecdotes). Tissot, though less popular, has some very appealing automatics including the Seastar diver(?) range. I have a Tissot with an ETA quartz movement that I adore.

I'm sure youre about to discover that it's not all about Omega vs. Rolex, and then everything lesser in teh world. There are dozens of really good watch brands still around. Members here have educated and introduced me to some of them. You're in the right group to find your next favorite watch. :drinks:

Edited by David Spalding
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.... Seiko introduced the first analog quartz chrono, IIRC, in the 7A38, then added a moonphase complication in the 7A48 ....

Close, David - but no cigar. :blow:

The Seiko 7A28 was the world's first analogue quartz chronograph, introduced in 1982:

67812.jpg

.... followed closely by the 7A38 (with Day/Date) in 1983, and your favoured moonphase 7A48 in 1984:

SeikoAdvert1984-7AxxMoon-Scan50.jpg

Edited by SEIKO7A38Fan
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Yeah, I thought it was 7A28, but knew you'd provide great vintage ad pics if I got it wrong. Hook, line, and sinker. :hi:

_____________

Martin, Paul has hit it out of the ballpark by showing you an ad illustrating what some of think may be the pinnacle of Seiko quartz-analog artistry: the 7A38, 7A48, and 7A28 chronos, available in a multitude of style and finish variations.

Of course, if you're after mechanical watches, precise little beauties may not divert your interest -- until you see one in operation.

Edited by David Spalding
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Nice topic and a very interesting discussion. I'd like to offer another vote for the 7s26 movement which, as I've mentioned before, seems utterly bullet-proof. I've had my S-Wave 0120 for some 12 years now; it cost about £100 new, it's never been serviced and runs like a dream to this day. Some years later I bought another one, in yellow.

I've never understood the need for spot-on accuracy, so the fact that this movement needs adjusting by a minute or two every few days is not a problem for me, at least. After all, there are many other devices in our lives these days which provide us with more accurate time-telling. However, an iPhone strapped to your wrist would look a bit silly. The 7s26 - and its later sibling, the 7s26A, is fitted into an amazing variety of cases and styles, falling into a number of price brackets. One of these should suit you. Hth. :)

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The SKX range - 007/009/011, 779/781 etc are excellent watches, and as said the 7S26 is a durable and accurate movement. Certainly happy with mine..

5067607428_6274a54908.jpg

With the budget though, you might consider something like the Sumo - SBDC001 / SBDC003 - using the 6R15 movement.

5067606836_0f1f7b2c8b.jpg

Howie

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A Seiko is a bit like a Ford car, reliable easy to maintain and will run for years even when abused. Expensive designer watches are very nice, but how much do the workings actually cost. Answer not a great deal compaired to the overall cost. I believe there is a Breitling retails £2000 insides cost £27 to trade.

Buy a Seiko 5 and judge for yourself.

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Goodness me. What a very helpful bunch you are. Thank you!

Angelis, that article looks like it has all the answers, I'll read it all properly. Thank you.

The gist from the rest is that I can't go far wrong with the 7S26 movement.

If I end up with a Kinetic, it needs to be the more recent battery type.

All in all it's exactly the sort of answer I was after. Thank you very much indeed.

Martin

******************Deleted*********************

Edited by JoT
No sales, wanted or trade posts except in their designated forums.
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Goodness me. What a very helpful bunch you are. Thank you!

Angelis, that article looks like it has all the answers, I'll read it all properly. Thank you.

The gist from the rest is that I can't go far wrong with the 7S26 movement.

If I end up with a Kinetic, it needs to be the more recent battery type.

All in all it's exactly the sort of answer I was after. Thank you very much indeed.

Martin

******************Deleted*********************

Knowledge is power...they say.

Yes, that article probably best represents the mass information re the 7S26A movements.

Cheers,

Angelis

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.... Seiko introduced the first analog quartz chrono, IIRC, in the 7A38, then added a moonphase complication in the 7A48 ....

Close, David - but no cigar. :blow:

The Seiko 7A28 was the world's first analogue quartz chronograph, introduced in 1982:

67812.jpg

.... followed closely by the 7A38 (with Day/Date) in 1983, and your favoured moonphase 7A48 in 1984:

SeikoAdvert1984-7AxxMoon-Scan50.jpg

Must say that's a very handsome watch and would look just as nice if released now

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Thank you all very much. I think I've found my answer.

It does eveything I want. Saphire glass, automatic (or Kinetic), no diving bezel, date, very pretty (beautiful), abd a lot less money than I hope I will get on ebay for my Seamaster.

s_sarb021a.jpg

I'm not making a blunder am I?

I'll get it from the shop I found via you lot, Seiya Japan.

Martin

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  • 2 weeks later...

Thank you all again for your help.

You led me to Seiya, where I found what I ended up buying. The movement in the mechanical spirit is a little less good than I had in my Omega, so I've ended up ditching all my pretentions to lavish watches and bought one of these.

s_sbca001a.jpg

Whilst investigating, I learnt that the Grand Seikos are as accurate as a quartz movement. Incredible. Why are Rolex and the other Swiss brands bought at all?

Branding. We are slaves to it.

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