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pauluspaolo

Bug Photos

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Usually, as in nature, the drab coloured specimens are females....the brightly coloured ones being males (think 'Peacock') so I reckon that's a female hawker youv'e pictured. The pic in your post above is a male, I think, because of the clasper appendages at the base of the tail. These are used to hold the female in position during the mating ritual.

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Dirty buggers.

It seemed to match the description of a Norfolk Hawker from your site (brown, green eyes, orange hue at the base of the wings) and didn't seem to match the Brown Hawkers here: http://www.british-dragonflies.org.uk/species/brown-hawker  Unfortunately, I didn't get a shot of it's back so don't know if it had the green triangle on it's back.

It was interesting to read that the Norfolk Hawker is endangered and their map suggests they are at least a little more widespread than they think.  Or am I reading it wrong?

http://www.british-dragonflies.org.uk/species/norfolk-hawker

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5 minutes ago, Krispy said:

Dirty buggers.

It seemed to match the description of a Norfolk Hawker from your site (brown, green eyes, orange hue at the base of the wings) and didn't seem to match the Brown Hawkers here: http://www.british-dragonflies.org.uk/species/brown-hawker  Unfortunately, I didn't get a shot of it's back so don't know if it had the green triangle on it's back.

It was interesting to read that the Norfolk Hawker is endangered and their map suggests they are at least a little more widespread than they think.  Or am I reading it wrong?

http://www.british-dragonflies.org.uk/species/norfolk-hawker

 Now you see why I love my job out in the open countryside and not sat in an office looking at a PC screen all day! Yeah!:thumbsup:

 

....but ..I do really appreciate all the hard work and effort that goes into running and keeping this forum going....'Horses for courses' as they say !

Edited by Roger the Dodger

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I have just come upon this marvellous thread and I am fascinated by all the pictures. If this thread was a photo competition, I would find it hard to anounce my favourite pic, but I think the award might go that fantastic ultra closeup of the Maybug/Cockchafer by Roger. The detail is staggering. Thanks for all the pleasure folks.:teethsmile:

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On 9/5/2016 at 14:22, Krispy said:

That's a mean looking bit of kit - do you know what it is?

Hugh's right, Dave ...it's the cast skin of a dragonfly nymph. Tha dragonfly spends several years underwater as a 'nymph', shedding it's skin as it grows bigger. When the last stage is reached, the nymph climbs up a reed stem and the adult emerges from a split down the nymph's back. At first, the wings are all crumpled and soft, but after a couple of hours of having blood pumped into them, they are expanded and dry, and the adult dragonfly is able to fly off.
 

Image result for dragonfly emerging from nymph
Image result for dragonfly emerging from nymph

The nymphs are verocious feeders on small fish fry, tadpoles, and other small invertibrates which they catch using an extendable jaw called the mask...
Image result for dragonfly nymph jaws

This is a nymph that I found in the pond at work while pond dipping one day...
large.029_zps0mw0o7ub.jpg.fa998def30b5d5b998dd42791ee9ba8d.jpg

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Just trying to get back into macro photography found this from a couple of years back was taken with Canon 60mm macro lens.

035.jpg

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I have a few insect pictures, some from the UK and others from the Middle East.

_AJ00459.jpg

Hover fly (UK)

AJD_2778_800.jpg

Hover fly (Bahrain)

AJD_2934_800.jpg

Huge wasp, surrounded by bees. (Bahrain)

AJD_3194_800w.jpg

Clouded yellow (Bahrain)

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Our pond at work is drying up again (this happens every year, because the pond level is the water table level) and I was netting out some of the 200 odd crucian carp to transfer to a holding tank, when a Southern Hawker Dragonfly put in an appearance. I actually caught him in the fish net, and took a quick couple of pics on my phone before releasing safely.

57cdc807499cf_large.20160905_2008211.jpg

 

 

 

57cdc7bfe29b4_large.20160905_2009531.jpg

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In the garden today no idea can't find it in my very basic book, about the size of a pinhead

Spidy small

Also got this happy chappie sorting out packed lunch

packed Lunch

Kev

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Apply nematodes during September/October to larvae (leatherjacket), no chemical available for homeowners at present.

A friendly licensed horticulturist may help with chemical treatment....nudge, nudge?

Hope this helps

 

Alan

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Ok....not my pic...stolen from the other side, and one of the 'Leenks' pics. 

Regulars will know how I keep banging on about how clever insects are at camouflage, and somewhere in the back pages are some pics of Cicadas that are masters of disguise.

But this chap must really take the prize at camouflage/evolution whatever you want to call it. This diguise is awesome, and before you ask me if it's photoshopped.....no it isn't. This is a real 'Leaf insect' complete with shape, veining and brown bits round the edges to complete the illusion.To put it into context, how many millenia and generations have passed for this insect to have developed this level of superb camo....? Remember what Charles Darwin said....only the fittest survive...........
Leaf insect.

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It's been a long time since I posted here, and such a shame that the majority of the pics have disappeared due to Photobucket, but hopefully, we can start again, and, as I have all my PB pics saved, can gradually start to re-post. In the past, I have shown pics of various beetles found in the UK, and today I found one of our largest, the Great Diving beetle, Dytiscus marginalis. Only the Stag beetle, and the Great Silver Diving beetle (very rare) are bigger. This is a ferocious predator in ponds, both the adult and the larva. The adults are about  11/2 inches ( 4cm) long. Below are some pics of a male ( the males have suckers on their front pair of legs), and a vid showing the larva attacking a dragonfly nymph.

Beetle, Great Diving. (Dytiscus marginalis)

Beetle, Great Diving. (Dytiscus marginalis)

Beetle, Great Diving. (Dytiscus marginalis)

Beetle, Great Diving. (Dytiscus marginalis)

Beetle, Great Diving. (Dytiscus marginalis)

Beetle, Great Diving. (Dytiscus marginalis)

 

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Just back from Portugal again, and was beginning to think it was too late in the year to see any interesting insects, but on the very last day, just as we were leaving the villa to go to the airport at 6.00 am, I spotted this small, brownish green Praying mantis on the wall, and quickly took some shots before leaving.

Praying mantis, Portugal 2017Praying mantis, Portugal 2017

 

Praying mantis, Portugal 2017Praying mantis, Portugal 2017

At first, I thought it was the same as a similar sized one I found several years ago...but this one is slightly different. Although it's a fully adult (it has wings) male, it doesn't have the same coloured hind wings that the former one did. That one was quite spectacular...

Praying mantis, brown.Praying mantis, brown.

Praying mantis, brown.

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A shame PB has deleted a lot of shots in this thread.

Heres a couple of mine to bring the standard down. 3e7d0f54fddd145ab1114482bfa54c3d.jpg1c1a4d976a31f91fbc0d02e5558dd56c.jpg

Sent from my LG-H440n using Tapatalk

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It's time to start re-populating this thread with some new pics. These are all the ones from my flora and fauna album that I had on Photobucket. I've now downloaded it and can post them again. I'll start with beetles, then move on to other species.

The largest beetle we have in the UK is the Stag beetle, closely followed by the Great Diving beetle (see above) and the Cockchafer. Only the male Stag has the large mandibles, the female has smaller, but much more powerful ones.

Beetle, Stag, male.

Female Stag.

Beetle, Stag, female.

 

Cockchafer and its larva. This is the male with its venetian blind like antannae.

Beetle, Cockchafer, male.

Beetle, Cockchafer larva.

 

The beautiful Rose chafer...

Beetle, Rose Chafer.

The Dung or Dor beetle...

 

Beetle, Dor.

Beetle, Dor.

 

The Lily beetle. These are a real nuisance if you have Lilies or Fritillaries growing in the garden. The larvae, which cover themselves with their own excrement, will decimate the leaves if not removed. The red adults make a squeaking sound if handled.

 

Beetles, Lily beetle.

Beetles, Lily beetle.

 

Beetles, Lily, Larva.

 

Beetles, Lily, Larva.

 

And finally, a couple from abroad, both from Menorca.

A Rhinocerous beetle, and a large, orange weevil type of beetle.

 

Beetles, Rhinocerous.

beetles, Rhinocerous.

Beetle, Large Weevil.

 

 

 

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This post is going to be about insect camouflage. It never ceases to amaze me how they have evolved over the millennia to be able to blend in with their surroundings completely, and some of the effects are stunning. Please post your shots too! 

Starting with caterpillars, the Hawk moth larvae have evolved to blend in with their food plants until they almost disappear. This is the larva of the Eyed Hawk moth which although pretty large when fully grown, has evolved to mimic the underside of the Willow leaves it feeds on, even having stripes in its flanks to resemble the leaf veins...
Moth, Eyed Hawk, Larva.

Moths, Eyed Hawk, Larva.

The Buff Tip moth is another that has great camo. This looks, to all intents and purposes, like a broken Birch twig. 
Moth, Buff Tip.

Moth, Buff Tip.

When I was in Portugal a few years ago, I was amazed at how loud the Cicadas sang during the day. Trying to find one to photograph, proved a little frustrating, as A. They are great ventriloquists...the sound appears to come from one place, but the insect is probably several feet away from where you think it is, and B. When at rest they blend in to the tree trunk as if they were part of it.

Cicada.

Cicada.

Cicada.

 

Finally, for now...we've all seen stick insects and know what they look like, but this chap has to take the prize! How long has it taken to evolve the shape, the brown bits round the edges, the veining that make this leaf insect the master of disguise?

Leaf insect.

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Time for some butterfly and moth pics. Years ago, I used to trap moths and had a huge collection of British species. That's now frowned upon today, so a few pics instead, starting with butterflies.

The Small Tortoiseshell butterfly on Buddleja.

Butterfly, Small Tortoiseshell.

Mating Cabbage White butterflies. Dirty (lucky!) buggers....

Butterflys, Large Cabbage White.

 

The Milkweed or Monarch butterfly. Pics taken in Spain as not a native in the UK.

Butterfly, Monarch.

The Monarch larva.

Butterfly, Monarch Larva.

...and its pupa...

Butterfly, Monarch Pupa.

Butterfly, Monarch pupae.

The Brimstone butterfly. This is the male. The female is a geenish-white. Brimstone is the old name for the element Sulphur, which is bright yellow in colour.

Butterfly, Brimstone.

Butterfly, Brimstone.

The Peacock butterfly on Buddleja.

Butterfly, Peacock.

 

The Red Admiral butterfly on Buddleja.

Butterfly, Red Admiral.

 

The Comma butterfly on the flower of common Laurel.

Butterfly, Comma.

The same Comma as above, but with wings closed showing the white comma mark from which it is named.

Butterfly, Comma.

Butterfly, Comma.

A male Orange Tip on Cow Parsley, wings closed, showing the mottled underwing that gives it some camouflage at rest. The female lacks the orange tips to the fore wings, and looks similar to a small white butterfly. She does, however, have the same camo to her underwings.

Butterfly, Orangetip.

...and a few moths...

The Eyed Hawk at rest. This is a newly hatched adult from the larva you'll see later.

Moth, Eyed Hawk.

The Eyed Hawk, displaying its famous 'eyes'. This is a defence machanism, used against birds that might want to try and eat it. The moth flashes the eyes on its hindwings, and hopefully, the attacker is scared off.

Moth, Eyed Hawk.

The Eyed Hawk larva.

Moth, Eyed Hawk, Larva.

...and the pupa it became.

Moths, Eyed Hawk, Pupa.

The Buff Tip moth, looking like a broken Silver Birch twig.

Moth, Buff Tip.

Moth, Buff Tip.

The Buff Tip larva.

Moth, Buff Tip, Larva.

The aptly named Plume moth.

Moth, Plume.

The Hummingbird Hawk moth at rest.

Moths, Hummingbird hawk at rest.

...and hovering like its namesake looking for nectar...in this case, from the shrubby Verbena, Lantana camara.

Moths, Hummingbird Hawk.

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Last year I posted some pics of a Southern Hawker dragonfly that was flying round the pond at work. This was the male with his beautiful blue and green colouring.

Dragonfly, Southern Hawker.

Dragonfly, Southern Hawker.

Today while doing a bit of pond maintenance, a female appeared and began laying eggs in the bankside vegetation. The female differs from the male in that she is green all over. After posing for a couple of quick snaps, she went straight back to egg laying.

Dragonfly, Southern Hawker, (F)

Dragonfly, Southern Hawker, (F).

 

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57 minutes ago, NOTSHARP said:

MOTH_1_1908.jpg

 

MOTH_5_1908.jpg

Steve.

Great shots! I especially like the pics of the 'Silver Y' moth....named after the characteristic mark on the forewings.

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A lot of Small Tortoiseshell about today.

 

ST_1.jpg

 

ST_4.jpg

 

Small White.

 

LW_4.jpg

 

A few Hover Flies were on the go, as well.

 

HOVER_FLY_A.jpg

 

 

 

Steve.

 

 

 

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