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Lets See All Those Omega'S!


stevieb
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AFAIK they only ever came in one case size William, although it is on the large size at 42mm excluding crown.

They did a few dial colour and handset variations though. Indeed few other members here have the lume indices and hands version which is more legible but imho not quite as attractive.

I owned the gold plated and dialled version with applied indices a while back. It was eventually traded for something else as it was very rarely worn.

DSC_0003.jpg

Like the steel version the dial is fantastic, well to my eyes anyway.

DSC_0004-1.jpg

Cheers,

Gary

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AFAIK they only ever came in one case size William, although it is on the large size at 42mm excluding crown.

They did a few dial colour and handset variations though. Indeed few other members here have the lume indices and hands version which is more legible but imho not quite as attractive.

I owned the gold plated and dialled version with applied indices a while back. It was eventually traded for something else as it was very rarely worn.

DSC_0003.jpg

Like the steel version the dial is fantastic, well to my eyes anyway.

DSC_0004-1.jpg

Cheers,

Gary

Does yours have the screw in case back? I think the screw in version had a slightly larger case then the press ins did.

I was bidding on a GP version recently. I was the second highest bid at the end, I didn't think the case wear justified going any higher. I ended up with the Speedmaster LCD instead. :rolleyes:

That gold one you had looks fantastic.

Later,

William

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Does yours have the screw in case back? I think the screw in version had a slightly larger case then the press ins did.

I was bidding on a GP version recently. I was the second highest bid at the end, I didn't think the case wear justified going any higher. I ended up with the Speedmaster LCD instead. :rolleyes:

That gold one you had looks fantastic.

Later,

William

I wasn't aware that there was a press in caseback version tbh William. I've owned three Speedsonics and handled many more but never seen one with a press in caseback. Interestingly though all three versions that I've owned have had a slightly different style.

Cheers,

Gary

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Thanks Roger and sorry for trying to teach William and yourself to suck eggs before. I really should read posts properly before I jump in :oops:

Cheers,

Gary

No worries Gary I didn't take it that way at all. By the way that 1970 Valjoux 7733 powered NOS cased chrono I bought from your watchmaker friend in Bristol is brilliant & keeping excellent time within a couple of seconds a day!

Cheers Roger

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Roger

The Omega movement serial number reflects the year(s) the movement was made. I was interested in whether the movement was made the same year as the watch was sold. If you have it serviced sometime, have them record the SN for you. :)

Later,

William

Hello William,

I also have a 920 Chronostop on a mesh which I bought new in 1971.

The serial number on my movement is for 1969.

Regards, Jack

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Omega at the time made movements in large runs rather than to small batches, which makes far more economic sense when you think about it.

The upshot of this is a movement made in 1969 could be put into a watch assembled a few years later, especially if that model was a slow seller. Plus the watch might have sat in an AD's display for a year or so before it eventually sold.

I've seen Omegas who's movements have revealed one date but Omegas records have shown that the watch was actually sold up to 3 years later. The movement number should really only be treated as a very rough guide to the watches production date, let alone sales date.

Cheers,

Gary

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Omega at the time made movements in large runs rather than to small batches, which makes far more economic sense when you think about it.

The upshot of this is a movement made in 1969 could be put into a watch assembled a few years later, especially if that model was a slow seller. Plus the watch might have sat in an AD's display for a year or so before it eventually sold.

I've seen Omegas who's movements have revealed one date but Omegas records have shown that the watch was actually sold up to 3 years later. The movement number should really only be treated as a very rough guide to the watches production date, let alone sales date.

Cheers,

Gary

Absolutely.

We don't come across many original Omega owners, and I'd like to get an idea of how purchase dates compare with movement manufacture dates. I've read a few times about people that have bought new watches two or three years after a model was discontinued.

Later,

William

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Nothing world class, but here are a few of my past and current pieces:

Memomatic. Lovely!

DSC00828.jpg

1940's 'suveran' with an awesome dial restoration, but god-awful re-lume job. Changed hands a few times since I parted with it I believe.

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70'ish dynamic. Quite a rare purple/copper dial on bracelet. One I regret parting with.

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18ct gold De-Ville. Early 70's again, and a mint condition example.

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I could carry on all day, but these have been my faves I reckon!

Edited by kevkojak
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:notworthy: That's some collection you've got there Ian, I'd better get trawling ebay for another Omega to keep up :D

What attract me to their 60's and 70's watches in particular, is there's just a wealth of different designs and technologies. Unlike a lot of manufacturers (mentioning no names for fear of being hung drawn and quartered :wink:) they really were trying hard, some could argue a little too hard on occasion.

Thanks for posting.

Cheers,

Gary

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My pleasure Gary and I agree totally re the diversity of design and technologies, the downside of which may have been their (almost)downfall in the 80's. Having acquired an example of all those on my initial wants list I think the next chapter of my Omega collection will be firmly 70's based, taking in one or two megaquatzes, a hummer or three and some of the fantastic looking Seamaster and Speedmaster models that used the 861 and 1040 movements.

All I've got to do now is sell the odd internal organ or two to fund it all!

Cheers

Ian

:notworthy: That's some collection you've got there Ian, I'd better get trawling ebay for another Omega to keep up :D

What attract me to their 60's and 70's watches in particular, is there's just a wealth of different designs and technologies. Unlike a lot of manufacturers (mentioning no names for fear of being hung drawn and quartered :wink:) they really were trying hard, some could argue a little too hard on occasion.

Thanks for posting.

Cheers,

Gary

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