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alcot33uk

Poljot Movements - Swiss?

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A friend of mine told me that Poljot use/copy some Breitling movements... Can anyone clarify this please?

Poljot have never used Breitling movements. I think the closest they have come is using their 3133 chronograph movement which is a knock-off of the Valjoux 7734 movement which in turn was used by Breitling (amongst many, many other manufacturers) in the 70's.

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A friend of mine told me that Poljot use/copy some Breitling movements... Can anyone clarify this please?

Poljot have never used Breitling movements. I think the closest they have come is using their 3133 chronograph movement which is a knock-off of the Valjoux 7734 movement which in turn was used by Breitling (amongst many, many other manufacturers) in the 70's.

I dont think that it was quite a 'knock off' , I think that Poljot bought the tooling from Valjoux.

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A friend of mine told me that Poljot use/copy some Breitling movements... Can anyone clarify this please?

Poljot have never used Breitling movements. I think the closest they have come is using their 3133 chronograph movement which is a knock-off of the Valjoux 7734 movement which in turn was used by Breitling (amongst many, many other manufacturers) in the 70's.

I dont think that it was quite a 'knock off' , I think that Poljot bought the tooling from Valjoux.

there is a very detailed thread over a t-z which proves the 2 movements couldn't have been made by the same tooling but that the 3133 is a copy of the valjoux. Maybe they did buy the tooling I don't know.

I like the 3133 movement and I think its got a solid reputation all of its now now.

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Russia was possibly the first 'knock off' nation of all. After Germany's WW2 defeat they hauled entire factories back to Mother Russia (as well as German rocket scientists), because they lacked manufacturing expertise and technology. They certainly did it with optics and motorcycles. The Russian binoculars, cameras and motorbikes on sale over here until the 1990s were pre-WW2 models - re-branded, but inferior quality German goods made in Russia. E.g Helios binoculars were Zeiss, Zorki cameras were Leica, and the Ural motorcycle/sidecar outfits were the very same pre-war BMWs you saw chasing after Clint Eastwood and Richard Burton in 'Where Eagles Dare' (but minus the sidecar mounted machine guns!).

So, did they rip-off Swiss watch movements? What do you think..?

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Tutima were chronograph manufacturers in East Germany, and i've read that some of their tooling was sent to (or copied at) the 1st Moscow Watch Factory in 1946. Fair reparation after the war ?? who can say..

That enabled production of the Kirova chronos - as per Kutusov's recent arrival which i shall be drooling over pics of soon as i've done here. :)

Tutima ain't Valjoux though, so where the 3133 came from i dunno

To throw another spanner into the works there's also the fact(?) that Seagull bought the Valjoux tooling for the ST19. Did the Russians get the secret plans from China? :ph34r:

It's all very intriguing.

Chronos aside, Maktime\Aviator are using some Swiss movements in their recent creations aren't they?

Maybe that's what the OP's friend was refering to?

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As I understand it they licensed the rights to the 7734, then modified it to suit themselves.

As far as Zeiss was concerned, the Russians had an interesting claim to the Zeiss name and patents. After WWII the Zeiss factory was in East Germany and therefore belonged to the Russians. The old Zeiss factory remained in Dresden and continued production. The Pentacons and Prakticas were superior to their Russian counterparts. The Russians took the plans for the Kiev 66 from Germany during the occupation, Hasselblad also stole them as well. :wink:

Later,

William

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The Soviets bought some tooling from the Swiss in the mid-1970's and adapted the 7734 design to produce the 3133 ... it's a simple story no conspiracy theories are necessary :lol:

Don't forget the 7734 was on its way out in any case and ceased production soon after.

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The Soviets bought some tooling from the Swiss in the mid-1970's and adapted the 7734 design to produce the 3133 ... it's a simple story no conspiracy theories are necessary :lol:

Don't forget the 7734 was on its way out in any case and ceased production soon after.

Too true & also remember is it also an improved version: 23 jewels as opposed to 17 jewels, higher beat 21600ah as opposedto 18000 A/h, & a higher power reserve of 51hrs as opposed to 45hrs!

Cheers Martin

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