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I recently came into posession of an antique pocket watch and have been unable to find any information at all about it. If there is anyone that might know something about this kind of watch or the maker, I would really appreciate any info at all. The face says A.Liano, Manila, Relojeria, Italiano. The works are marked with A.Liano Patent around a cross, with the number 5782 on another cross. The case is marked witht he C,900 and a standing wolf of Sterling Silver along with the same A. Liano Patent mark, and a serial number of 19252, and a backwards E. I am attaching the link to a couple of pictures which I hope will work.

http://s184.photobuc...ush/My%20watch/

If there is anyone that might know something about this kind of watch or the maker, I would really appreciate any info at all. Thanks.

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Additional info. I paid $85 U.S for this watch because it wasn't working and I could tell that it was way older than what they thought. I took it to a trusted local clock/watch shop and had it repaired which included replacing the missing back crystal. This cost me another $325 U.S. It keeps very good time now when I remember to wind it. I know it is of European make becsuse it has a pin set system. I do historical reenactment specializing in the U.S. Civil War and plan on using it for that. So far everybody that has seen it are upset that I have it and they don't. Imagine that.. haha

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I do historical reenactment specializing in the U.S. Civil War and plan on using it for that. So far everybody that has seen it are upset that I have it and they don't. Imagine that.. haha

In the 1860s, key-operated watches were still very common. Yours is a keyless watch, and so is too modern for the Civil War.

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In the 1860s, key-operated watches were still very common. Yours is a keyless watch, and so is too modern for the Civil War.

At least it's mechanical, and a very nice looking watch.

In my experience re-enactors are happy to use quartz watches, often being unaware that the movement and position of the second hand gives them away as modern. If this is pointed out the usual response seems to be "it's a pocket watch, the public won't notice more than that".

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