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R L T - 17


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You might wish to see Born's rendition of the RLT17 which will form part of a frontispiece that I am working on.

It's called "The time is now", the year is 1919 ... and it represents the acceptance of the wristwatch in civilian life. For those who will be seeing the painting and want to know more about the watch (in the picture) ... I am preparing a review and also getting some neat pictures done of it. More news as it comes in.

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john

Very cool John cool.gif

Love it heart.gifheart.gifthumbup.gif

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Light always travels at the speed of light relative to each person observing it. So to Einstein, the light from the torch would be travelling at the speed of light and would appear perfectly normal. To any other another observer, the light would also appear to be travelling at the speed of light and equally normal.

This is the problem - common sense would seem to dictate that if a light source was itself travelling at the speed of light and then itself radiated light, then light emnating in the direction of travel should (by common sense rules) appear to be travelling at twice the speed of light. But this cannot be possible as the speed of light is accepted as an absolute constant - in a vacuum, light ALWAYS travels at the same speed, regardless of how it is measured.

The answer - I don't have one. (I have not got a clue - please see below laugh.gif ) The accepted theory is that because the speed of light is an absolute constant, the failure is not one of theory, but is in fact that common sense cannot be used to predict what happens. Common sense if fact, fails.

Getting back onto watches for a tick (for a tick laugh.giflaugh.gif ) I quite like that AR by the way, very clean design.

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Getting back onto watches for a tick (for a tick  laugh.gif  laugh.gif ) I quite like that AR by the way, very clean design.

What is ironic is that the ETA 6497/98 in the AR was originally designed by ARSA and used in various sizes for years often designated as Unitas before it was sold-off and now has to be bought back by whoever is using the AR name.

john

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........................

Getting back onto watches for a tick (for a tick  laugh.gif  laugh.gif ) I quite like that AR by the way, very clean design.

What is ironic is that the ETA 6497/98 in the AR was originally designed by ARSA and used in various sizes for years often designated as Unitas before it was sold-off and now has to be bought back by whoever is using the AR name.

john

Any Idea when the movement was first produced? wink2.gif

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Any Idea when the movement was first produced? wink2.gif

I don’t have a definitive date yet ... the earliest I have seen were in WWII German DHs ... so let’s call it middle ‘30s for now.

Here’s one (the watch itself is 35mm):

http://www.sfu.ca/~mmh/dhArsa10.jpg

I know that ARSA were prolific pocket watch manufacturers and I wouldn’t be surprised if that’s where the roots are.

Balmer do an automatic version. Check them out, you will be astonished (especially at the price).

john

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I think the Unitas 6497/8 movements were originally designed in the 1950's. from some web history I was able to find:

In 1898, Auguste Reymond established his watch company, Manufacture Auguste Reymond in the small town of Tramelan in the center of the Jura Mountain region of Switzerland. He also began to manufacture movement blanks, or ebauches, in 1906. Reymond later gave the name of these ebauches UNITAS, after the UNITAS Watch Company he acquired in 1926.

In the early 1930s, the Incabloc® movement shock absorber was developed, and it revolutionized movement durability and maintaining accuracy. It was adopted by virtually all Swiss movement manufacturers. It has been refined over the decades since and is the premier method of protecting Swiss watches from severe shock. UNITAS incorporated the Incabloc® system in their movements. Among them is the UNITAS 6497 and 6498 pocketwatch movements designed in the 1950s. The 6497 and 6498 calibers became regarded as among the best pocketwatch movements ever designed for their ruggedness and accuracy.

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Thanks Guys most interesting thumbup.gif

I`ve got a real fondness for the 6497/8, so far I have three watches using it; the RLT-17, a Zeno Beobachtungsuhr and a Glycine Incusore punk.gifpunk.gif

Its quite likely I`ll get more in the future wink2.gif

An automatic version John eek.gif I`m not sure I like the sound of that no.gif

Edited by mach 0.0013137
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  • 1 month later...

I hope to find out what all the fuss is about on Tuesday  ph34r.gif

I, too, have only recently joined the 17 fraternity. I'm glad I took the diminishing opportunity - there can't be many left now. The reason for all the fuss becomes clear once it's in your hand (& on your wrist, of course) wink.gif

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